Posts tagged with "SLO Architecture":

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SLO Architecture helps preserve New York City’s disappearing graffiti walls

Demolition of the graffiti mecca known as “5Pointz” in Long Island City, Queens has become a flashpoint in New York City development. The iconic arts institution was literally whitewashed by the developer last spring and has since been turned to rubble to make way for two rental towers. As the controversial project continues in Queens, the destruction of another world-renowned graffiti forum, just a few miles away in the South Bronx, has gone largely unnoticed. The graffiti-covered walls of Boone Avenue are currently being demolished to make way for a massive housing development. For decades, some of the world's most respected street artists came to this desolate, industrial stretch, turning warehouses into canvases. The result was a constantly-evolving public gallery, curated by Cope2, a living legend in the street art world. But, let's be clear, this is not the same story as 5Pointz—the new development will not be luxury towers, but much-needed affordable housing. Still, the loss of a cultural institution is the loss of a cultural institution. Since the city broke ground on the development, a coalition of artists, architects, and students has formed to preserve as much of the site's history as it can. The project is called The Boone Room and its being run by SLO Architecture, the Bronx River Art Center, and students from Fannie Lou Hamer High School in the Bronx, and The New School in Manhattan. Last spring, students conducted video interviews with local artists and photographed existing work as part of an online exhibition that will go live in January. To create new, permanent street art in the neighborhood, artists, under the curatorship of Cope2, were commissioned to paint an interior wall of the Fannie Lou Hamer High School. The team behind The Boone Room has also worked with the developer to preserve some of Boone Avenue's colorful, roll-down gates which are being repurposed into a canopy for a performance space outside of the Bronx River Art Center. When AN recently visited Boone Avenue, local artist and resident David Yearwood, was working on what's known as Boone Avenue's "practice wall.” (This wall is expected to be demolished by a later stage in the development.) “Doing art in the neighborhood is a hard thing to do,” said Yearwood. “I’ve got a lot of friends that don’t like art, so you’ve got to find things to do get out of the neighborhood.” So Boone Avenue is where Yearwood comes, almost every single day. Finding somewhere else like Boone won’t be easy. "It’s basically a rough life right now for a lot of people,” he said. “There’s nowhere else to go.”
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Archtober Building of the Day #26> SLO Architecture adds art to Middletown Road Station in the Bronx

Archtober Building of the Day #26 Middletown Road Station Middletown Road & Westchester Avenue, Bronx SLO Architecture The “steel river,” as Alexander Levi of SLO Architecture referred to the Pelham Line #6 train on last weekend's Archtober tour, makes its way north towards Pelham Bay, crossing over four different waterways along its route. These bodies of water are cleaner now than they used to be, due in part to community-based efforts to clear unwanted debris and waste. As a result, plants and animals have returned to the area, and a feeling of pride has returned to the community. To uphold this stewardship and help maintain the waterways, Levi and Amanda Schachter of SLO designed Cross-Bronx Waterway for the Middletown Road Station, commissioned by MTA Arts & Design and chosen through a panel process. Cross-Bronx Waterway shows the evolution of the river cleanup projects. The series of eight stainless-steel panels, fabricated by AMI-Metal, depict birds, fish, boats, bottles, and other living and nonliving inhabitants of the surrounding rivers. The objects float within ribbons of steel, or “water,” assembled in different patterns on each panel. The birds depicted are species recently found along the Bronx River that had not been spotted for years, including herons. Despite signs of improvement, Schachter stressed that there are still objects found in the river that are not meant to be there. By including unwanted objects in the art as well, the architects have created a reminder that community members must continue to care for the natural environment and prevent the rivers from returning to their previous state. Levi and Schachter also wanted to create a sense of being underwater for people waiting for trains on the elevated platforms. Looking at the sculptural panels, subway-riders see the bottom of boats and the underside of birds. From the street, pedestrians looking up see the objects that protrude from the panels from an above-water angle. The architects intentionally changed the sense of view.
Emma Pattiz is Policy Coordinator for the AIA New York Chapter.
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SLO Architecture Proposes a Train Station Rehab in the Bronx

When two architects, Amanda Schachter and Alexander Levi, principals of SLO Architecture, came across an abandoned train station in the Bronx located next to Concrete Plant Park, they saw a unique opportunity to reuse a historic building and help facilitate better access and use of the adjacent green space. Tonight at the Youth Ministries for Peace and Justice in the Bronx, Schachter and Levi will present their project, called Bronx River Right-of-Way. In an interview with Urban Omnibus, the architects describe how they will split the station, designed by Cass Gilbert in the 1930s, into two parts. First, the duo proposes to transform the former head house into a new entryway into the park, and then move the former waiting room to the riverside and turn it into a boathouse. The new entryway will link the park to the neighborhood with a bridge that goes over the railroad tracks that now belong to Amtrak’s Northeast Corridor. With a grant from the James Marston Fitch Foundation, they’ve put together a proposal to make this dilapidated station into a resource for the park providing services and amenities such as “bike rental and repair, restrooms, or Parks Department maintenance space.”