Posts tagged with "Silverstein Properties":

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Archtober Building of the Day #25> 4 World Trade Center by Fumihiko Maki

Archtober Building of the Day 4 World Trade Center 150 Greenwich Street Maki and Associates Located along the western edge of Memorial Plaza, 4 World Trade Center by Maki and Associates is part of the Studio Libeskind master plan for the World Trade Center being developed by Silverstein Properties. This weekend, Archtober crowds toured the building. The materials used throughout 4WTC bring the outside in—a black, polished Swedish granite wall brings a reference to the Memorial Plaza into the building’s lobby. The high feldspar content of the granite creates a stippling effect that softens and slightly abstracts this reflection. The glass used in the first-floor lobby is low in iron, rendering it incredibly clear, while the more reflective glass of the stories above emphasizes the building’s connection with the diagonally adjacent One World Trade Center. Sky Memory, a sculpture by the Japanese artist Kozo Nishino, is composed of lightweight titanium arcs that emerge from the black granite wall and, in a trick of the eye, reads as a full circle. Pure white Thassos marble along the north wall of the lobby stands in contrast to the black granite. It reappears in the core of the building, where three lobbies lead to a bank of elevators. These lobbies are clad in wood panels that were all harvested from a single Anigre tree. Coated with six layers of polyester and one of polyurethane, the panels reflect scenes of water, trees, and sky depicted in LED screens at the ends of the lobbies. After a quick, ear-popping elevator ride 57 stories up, we disembarked to breathtaking views. As Osamu Sassa, the project architect, pointed out, the notches that accentuate the corners of the building when viewed from a distance also double the number of coveted corner offices available on each floor. After a few minutes of snapping selfies, we reconvened on the terrace formed by the cutout in the building’s facade. One World Trade Center, the tallest building in the United States, did not seem quite as overwhelming from this vantage point. The Pavilion at Brookfield Place, with its grand lobby that we visited on Archtober 12, appeared diminutive by comparison. Cynthia Kracauer:
My bad. I missed the first hour of the tour led by Osamu Sassa and Mary Dietz. Sassa was the project architect for seven years for the many Maki projects in New York. Dietz represented Silverstein Properties. Archtober minions were out in force, so I will cede my blog space to those who actually enjoyed the presentation. Nonetheless, Benjamin and I had a wonderful post-tour conversation with Sassa. We both noted how much 4 WTC resembles the work of Edward Larrabee Barnes. Sassa had Barnes as a critic at the GSD, and expressed a reverence for him—and shared our sense that his contribution to the tropes of skyscraper design is under-recognized.
Cynthia Phifer Kracauer, AIA, is the Managing Director of the Center for Architecture and the festival director for Archtober:  Architecture and Design Month NYC.  She was previously a partner at Butler Rogers Baskett, and from 1989-2005 at Swanke Hayden Connell.  After graduating from Princeton (AB 1975, M.Arch 1979) she worked for Philip Johnson,  held faculty appointments at the University of Virginia, NJIT, and her alma mater.
 
 Julia Cohen is the Archtober Coordinator at the Center for Architecture.
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Stalled Residential Tower in Lower Manhattan to Rise Next to Woolworth Building

A giant residential skyscraper is slated to join Manhattan’s skyline— rising more than 130 feet above its neighbor, the Woolworth Building.  Developer Silverstein Properties announced today that $950 million in funding has been secured to move forward with the construction of the Robert A.M. Stern Architects-designed tower at 30 Park Place in Lower Manhattan. This massive building will climb up to 82-stories—making it the tallest residential tower in Downtown Manhattan according to a recent statement—and will include a 185-room Four Seasons hotel, 157 Four Seasons luxury residences, and a public plaza. Yabu Pushelberg, the design firm behind a slew of W and Four Season Hotels, will design the interiors for this project. Silverstein Properties anticipates that the they will break ground by Fall 2013 and complete the 926-feet tower by 2016.
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Bloomberg Looking Up Again at Richard Rogers’ Three World Trade

Almost a year ago, reports surfaces that, without an anchor tenant, the 80-story Three World Trade tower by Pritzker-winner Richard Rogers of Rogers, Stirk, Harbour + Partners would be lopped off at seven stories. Without an anchor tenant signing up for at least 400,000 square feet of space in the $300 million tower, the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey will not guarantee the project's debt. Mayor Bloomberg is optimistic, though, telling the New York Post last week that the tower is "closer than anyone realizes" to landing that all-important tenant, which could be GroupM, a subsidiary of  advertising giant WPP. The Post said the company is interested in 550,000 square feet of the tower's 2.8 million total square feet. If a deal is signed and construction continues, the tower could be complete in 2015. Bloomberg also delivered the not-unexpected news that Norman Foster's 88-story Two World Trade tower will likely remain a stump for the near future. SOM's One World Trade and Fumihiko Maki's Four World Trade are expected to be finished by the end of the year. In the meantime, take a look back at Silverstein's blockbuster video rendering of the complete World Trade Center site.
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Three World Trade Tower Could be Lopped Off

Richard Rogers' planned 80-story Three World Trade Center could come in a little short—okay, 73-stories short—if office tenants aren't found for the under-construction tower by the end of the year. Crain’s reports that developer Larry Silverstein plans to cap the tower at seven floors and fill the podium with retail uses. If an anchor tenant is later found—as late as 2020—the building's cap can be removed and construction resumed to reach its original height. Experts said the economy is to blame as large-scale office tenants are reluctant to spend millions on new space. "The willingness of large-scale tenants to commit in this environment is limited because companies don't want to go out and spend a lot of money," Peter Hennessy, president of Cassidy Turley's New York Tristate Region, told Crain's. "It's not the building; it's the market." News of the potential capping comes as no surprise, as a 2010 agreement between Silverstein and the Port Authority dictated that the developer prelease 400,000 square feet and line up $300 million for Three World Trade before the agency would back the project's debt. Silverstein's adjacent 72-story Four World Trade Center by Fumihiko Maki pre-leased about 600,000 square feet of space and will be complete next year.