Posts tagged with "Sight Unseen":

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Seth Rogan and other celebs pair with designers for unique NYCxDesign pieces

Digital magazine Sight Unseen has paired 13 celebrities from film, fashion, and art with 13 interior and furniture designers to create one-of-a-kind objects for this year’s New York Design Week (NYCxDESIGN). Each of the items are available for sale, with the proceeds going to benefit a charity of the pair’s choosing. The collaboration is part of Sight Unseen’s fifth annual OFFSITE fair, which will be spread out across 13 separate venues across downtown Manhattan between May 17 and May 20. The collection, dubbed Field Studies, will anchor the fair’s central hub at 201 Mulberry Street. “The idea was to connect creatives across disciplinary boundaries so they could search for commonalities in their practices and discover what unexpected ideas might result,” said Sight Unseen in a statement. Contemporary design studio Bower and actor Seth Rogan have created a massive mirror inspired by “shared influences  —  midcentury  furniture,  street  art,  and  the  colors  of  1980s  pop  culture.” The six-foot-tall mirror is actually composed of glass strips positioned on top of a gradient painting, lending the illusion of a three-dimensional globe. Artist and designer Christopher Stuart and artist Julia Dault have produced a circular, backlit sconce that seemingly “peels” away from the wall it’s attached to, revealing a soft glow at the corner. Designer Fernando Mastrangelo and actor Boyd Holbrook have created a set of planters carved from massive lumps of coal, in reference to Holbrook’s father, a Kentucky coal miner. Creative consulting and interior design firm Wall for Apricots and actor Jason Schwartzman have designed a postmodern pastel pink-and-gold piano with matching stool. The team wrapped a classic 1970s Hohner Clavinet Pianet keyboard inside of a plywood console table to completely disguise the instrument within. Furniture and lighting designer Kelly Wearstler and fashion blogger Aimee Song have put together a shaggy sitting stool made from dyed goat hair, with brass legs ending in plunger-like red marble feet. Designer Harry Nuriev and artist Liam Gillick have fabricated a series of rectangular floor lamps that integrate stainless steel with the glass panels that Gillick is known for. Furniture studio Ladies & Gentlemen Studio and fashion designers Kaarem have encased custom Kaarem fabric swatches in resin to create a series of vases. Architect Drew Seskunas of The Principals and musician Angel Olsen have built a machine that translates sound waves into wax forms. The resultant shapes were then used to cast unique aluminum candlesticks. Rafael de Cárdenas of Architecture at Large and fashion stylist Mel Ottenberg have translated the ribbed structural details of furniture into three quilts, each made of luxury materials like merino and suede. Designer Oliver Haslegrave of Home Studios and stylist Natasha Royt have reinterpreted the suit stand for the modern age, including stratifying different types of marble into the cubic base. Interior designer Kelly Behun and fashion designer Narciso Rodriguez have put together a sculptural, asymmetric lounge chair that forces its occupant into an unfamiliar situation where they need to rebalance themselves. Glass designer Thaddeus Wolfe and chef Ignacio Mattos have designed a hand-blown glass cake stand that resembles a hunk of ice. The glass is embedded with concave lenses, which appear to minimize whatever’s placed inside the case. Painter Andrew Kuo provided an artwork and furniture maker Tyler Hays of BDDW took the opportunity to turn it into a puzzle. The pieces and lettering within are obscured by Kuo’s design for an added level of difficulty. All 13 pieces are available for sale here.
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What to expect at NYCxDESIGN this year

The design industry takes over New York for NYCxDESIGN, a multifaceted platform for designers, showrooms, firms, students, and cultural institutions to share their latest projects, installations, and exhibitions. Here are a few highlights that you won’t want to miss from WantedDesign, Sight Unseen OFFSITE, ICFF, BROOKLYN DESIGNS, and independent studios.

The Fraction Collection Gentner

This collection of furniture, lighting, and decorative art objects is associated not with a particular genre but rather with a stylized aesthetic vocabulary that Christopher Gentner took a year to hash out in his Chicago studio. The collection— the culmination of sculptural abstractions, a metal material palette, negative space, kinetic components, and subtle pops of color—will be on view at ICFF.

Bough Kalon

L.A.-based Kalon Studios designed a simple collection that accentuates the inherent beauty of wood. The series—comprising a table, bench, and stool—is manufactured in a Pennsylvania workshop that specializes in woodwork.

EXCAVATED VESSELS Jeff Martin Joinery

The Canada-based studio conjured otherworldly shaped glass containers by molding and casting glass around cork molds. The collection of vessels, goblets, basins, decanters, jugs, and pitchers will debut at Collective Concept, the capsule exhibition of the Collective Design fair at ICFF.

Alabaster Totem Allied Maker

For Collective Concept at ICFF, Allied Maker designed six totems of light, each articulating a single material. The studio collaborated with six local artisans, each of whom specializes in either wood, metal, glass, stone, ceramic, or fabric. All of the luminaries stand over seven-and-and-a-half feet tall, creating a heightened presence informed by material and shape.

kinder MODERN x Mexa

Guadalajara, Mexico–based design studio Mexa teamed up with the New York City–based gallery kinder MODERN to craft a collection of outdoor furniture for children. The colorful handmade series includes a collapsible play tent, rocking planters in multiple sizes, a sculptural outdoor double-seat chaise, and individual open-frame rockers.

Neotenic Lounge JUMBO

Design duo Justin Donnelly and Monling Lee conceived a cast-steel chair with a “clumsy pipe” framework, finished in auto body paint and saddled with a dyed fur seat. The playful form was inspired by Konrad Lorenz’s 1949 study of “baby schema,” which the zoologist and Nobel laureate believed would trigger “innate releasing mechanisms” to elicit sympathy in the beholder.

Rye Sofa TRE

In the international wing at Wanted Design, visitors are encouraged to configure and reconfigure partitions to make one solid mass. Articulated by vibrant and contrasting colors, three modules of varying sizes form myriad seating combinations.

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Fernando Mastrangelo’s MMaterial collection uses hand-dyed cements to produce multihued furniture

Featured at the third annual Sight Unseen OFFSITE fair, Brookyn-based artist Fernando Mastrangelo calls his Fade Series of the MMATERIAL line “functional sculptures.” They're the result of a minimalist aesthetic blended with sculptural craftsmanship. The pieces are composed of hand-dyed cements transforming a rugged material into simplistic blends of color to create ombre effects. Much of Mastrangelo's work uses aggregates such as rock, sand, glass, and silica in addition to hand-dyed cements. These elements are fused together in Mastrangelo’s casting process which uses salt, sugar, sand, coffee, and corn. This range of materials results in distinct tables, desks, cylinders, and custom pieces that can seem reminiscent of vast landscapes. Each piece is unique.
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NYC Design Week Trend Report: craving concrete

With all of the goings-on during NYCxDesign, it can be hard to wrap one's brain around everything on display. Thoughts range from "That's beautiful" to "What's going on here?" and, at the end of a week, everything begins to meld to gather in a phantasmagoria of colors, textures, and styles. One recurring motif that stuck in our mind was concrete. Sure, home decor has been gearing toward the material for some time, but all over the city—including Sight Unseen OFFSITE and ICFF—concrete was being molded into unexpected design elements. MMATERIAL Designed and constructed by Fernando Mastrangelo, his newest line of sculptural furniture uses hand-dyed and cast concrete to create surprisingly smooth stools, tables, and art. He also has a large retail installation in the works utilizing the same techniques, but more on that later. Concrete Cat Concrete Cat's Oracle pattern is one-of-a-kind, and is actually cast into each piece rather than being applied or painted onto the surface. In addition to beautiful homewares (including the above cinderblocks that can be used in hundreds of ways from furniture, to modular walls), they also specialize in architectural castings, including retail displays, fireplaces, and tiles. Lyon Beton This collection of fiberglass coated concrete furniture adapts a mid-century, minimal style that really stood out at this year's ICFF. The pieces are fairly light, and use a combination of sophisticated polished concrete, with a more industrial rough-textured back and wrought irons legs. Plus they make whimsical vases, toilet paper holders, and art. IN.SEK These beautiful concrete pendant lamps are available in a range of different sizes and shapes; they also come in classic smooth concrete or excavation-light that makes it appear as if light is escaping from the cracks in a decaying building. On top of beautiful lighting, In.Sek also makes excavated stools that resemble caves growing quartz crystals. OSO Industries' Rollerboys may look like an average round stool or coffee table, but these ultra-light cylinders roll around on recessed wheels that give the illusion that they float. It has never been easier to transition furniture from indoors to out, plus they are available in twelve color options to match any decor.
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What to see at Sight Unseen OFFSITE

The third annual Sight Unseen OFFSITE—curated by Monica Khemsurov and Jill Singer, founders of design magazine (and online shop) Sight Unseen—features a slew of unique international designers hailing from Vancouver to Moscow, as well as a room-sized installation from New York City-based architects Leong Leong. Located at the 15th floor of The Grace Building (1114 Avenue of the Americas, May 13-16), Khemsurov and Singer's collection is impressive array. Highlights included the slender, sculptural, steel furniture of Moscow-based architecture firm Crosby Studios (their pieces are actually fabricated in Brooklyn). The young firm was founded by Harry Nuriev and Dmitry Vorontsov in 2014. In pieces that reminded me of early experimental Bauhaus (think Oskar Schlemmer costumes, plus a dash of László Moholy-Nagy and Eames coat hanger), Montreal-based Jean-Pascal Gauthier blends a playful mixture of lines, materials, and functions. 10 of his unique hand-made creations, crafted from wood, marble, brass, and steel, are on display. These dichroic lights, which come in modular components for easy customization, are from Toronto-based Shelter Bay. Sight Unseen organized this collaboration among five New York- and Norwegian-based designers ("Norway x New York"). In addition to textiles, furniture, lighting, and decor, this installation from Leong Leong (dubbed TOPO) graces the entrance of the fair. The space is a multi-sensory experience: soft foam cylinders have been carved into a gently curving landscape that eerily feels like a computer-modeled landscape directly translated to physical form. Mirrors make the space seem endless while a sound system, designed in conjunction with Arup, listens, processes, and amplifies ambient sounds to produce an otherworldly digital humming.
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Sight Unseen to curate second exhibition at Collective Design fair

Design and visual arts magazine Sight Unseen will stage a second exhibition at New York's Collective Design fair on May 4 to 8. Curated by founders Monica Khemsurov and Jill Singer, the show features work from four emerging American design firms: Bower x Studio Proba, Chris Wolston, Fort Makers, and Only Love Is Real. The latter will show, for the first time, a collection of lighting and furniture, displayed against custom wall paper by Designtex. As a go-to space for emerging trends in contemporary design, Sight Unseen's exhibition delivers on the promise implicit in its name. See below for details on each studio's presentation: Bower x Studio Proba Studio Proba and Bower teamed up to unleash Zendo, a furniture collection that draws on the themes of water, transcendence, and reflection to ensconce users in a "multi-sensory," but calm, environment. Users can listen to the gurgling Pivot fountain while lounging on the Nirvana rug, or the Waterline chair, and contemplating the meaning of life in the multicolored Water mirrors. Chris Wolston Brooklyn- and Medellin-based designer Chris Wolston combines traditional production technique with contemporary, high-tech materials. For the Collective Design fair, Wolston sand-casted aluminum foam sheeting that's typically used in architectural sound-proofing to create sculpted lighting, tables, and seating. Only Love Is Real OLIR founder Matthew Morgan synthesizes the geometry of Sol LeWitt and Milo Baughman’s 1980s-era étagères to create shelving units that reference the precision of the latter with the glam but barely functional nature of the former. Every angle of his pieces is divisible by three, a comment on harmony, consistency, and structure.   Fort Makers Fort Makers will showcase a new group of usable, riotously colorful, geometric sculpture. The wallpaper mural dialogues with the maple furniture, like a desk with an oval glass top and accompanying modular shelving unit. Hand-painted canvas, in the same pattern as the mural, is incorporated into square and rectangular seating units.  
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Product> Furnishings from New York City’s ICFF Expo

At ICFF 2014, mature design reclaimed the stage. With other exhibit opportunities for up-and-coming designers—WantedDesign and Sight Unseen Offsite, along with the Industry City venue in Brooklyn—established manufacturers set the tenor of the show this year. Further cementing the show's place near the top of the trade show hierarchy, many of the exhibitors that displayed their wares at Salone del Mobile in Milan a few short weeks ago were also present in New York. Here are six products that stood out to AN among the rows of exhibitors. Blu Dot Swish Desk A split-level sliding top and drawer stretch the storage capacity of this neo-modern, white-ash desk. Legs in white or grey. Marset Ginger Topped by a shallow, cup-like shade of oak or wenge veneer, the fixture uses a LED light source; also available in floor and table models. Designed by Joan Gaspar. Foscarini Spokes Concealed at the top and bottom of the fixture, LED lamps cast light upwards and downwards, casting shadows from the metal, cage-like shade. Designed by Vicente Garcia Jimenez and Cinzia Cumini. Bensen Tokyo Chair With aesthetic lineage extending to Danish and Japanese design, the slightly torqued armrests of this solid wood chair are key to its contemporary presence. In black ash, walnut, white ash, and white oak, with a leather seat. Designed by Niels Bendtsen. Fritz Hansen Analog Table Merging square, circle, and oval into an inviting, unique form, the legs of this table are angled to allow more comfortable seating. In five colors and finishes, it is suitable for home or office use. Designed by Jaime Hayon. Rimadesio Self Up Classic dressers, nightstands, and sideboards are revitalized in lacquered glass and aluminum frames and feet. Available in 62 colors. Designed by Giuseppe Bavuso.