Posts tagged with "SHoP Architects":

Placeholder Alt Text

South Street Seaport Preservationistas: Oh no! PoMo Don’t Go!

The PoMo aficionados were out in force at yesterday’s Landmarks Preservation hearing for the new proposal for South Street Seaport’s Pier 17. It would seem that just as debate on the value of 1970s Brutalism shifts into high gear, the 1980s PoMo crowd is revving its engines. As preservationists and developers whacked it out, some larger questions about context and neighborhood integration arose. The SHoP-designed tectonic glass response to Ben Thompson’s wood-clad gables of the exiting 1985 Pier 17 building is a clear break from the past, both literally and figuratively. SHoP’s Gregg Pasquarelli didn’t mince words when he told the New York Times “We’re taking away the po-mo and making it a real waterfront market building.” But Thompson, who died in 2002, had plenty of defenders on hand yesterday, including a statement from his wife Jane Thompson, who warned that real estate in the new plan “will inevitably rise to premium rates; privatization will intensify, which forces a turn to luxury retail.” Elise Quasebarth, of the preservation consultancy group Higgins Quasebarth, testified on behalf of Howard Hughes Corporation, the developer, that many of the upland elements planned in conjunction with the 1980s "festival marketplace" are still fundamentally robust. The SHoP worked with James Corner Field Operations to further integrate the street grid through a north-south connection to the East River Waterfront Esplanade and east-west connections to Beekman and Fulton streets. But the deal between NYC Economic Development Corporation and Howard Hughes has a distinct cutoff point at the so-called Tin Building. The empty 1907 structure, which formerly housed a market, sits at the river’s edge where the pier juts into the river. Though the plan has the support of Community Board 1, the board did encourage a master plan that carries through the entire South Street Seaport Historic District. Further complicating matters, the district actually cuts through half of Pier 17. The board resolved the districting by extending the boundary to incorporate the north section of the pier as well. The concern was driven home by local wine merchant Marco Pasanella who testified that the uplands should be considered as part and parcel pier plan and that only a “holistic” approach would work, particularly while the pier is under construction. Pasanella said the big picture should ensure that the plan attract similar tenants and “the right sort of visitors." Speaking on behalf of the Howard Hugh’s Corporation, senior executive vice president Chris Curry said the taking the nearby elements into account, particularly the Tin Building, would require a separate ULURP.  He added that the company wants to make an immediate investment, though that wouldn't preclude additional investments down the line. For the time being however, the cutoff point leaves a few of Thompson’s gables left at the back of the pier. Pasquarelli said they would be painted a uniform color to visually drop away. The gables would still function as a mask for mechanical equipment. If all goes as planned, a little slice of PoMo might survive after all.      
Placeholder Alt Text

SHFT+ALT+DEL: March 9

Vishan Chakrabarti joins SHoP Architects as a partner, but will remain director of the Columbia Center for Urban Real Estate, a position he's held since 2009. Peter Schubert becomes a partner at Ennead Architects, where he'll be "enhancing international efforts"; Schubert was most recently at RMJM. Robert Allen Design appoints Kerry Galloway as their new vice president of contract sales. Galloway was formerly vice president, sales and marketing for Contract Décor International. In office expansion news, Aedas announces it plans to double the size of its London office (currently 80 staffers) in the next two years to keep pace with work in Russia and North Africa. Have news on movers and shakers in the architecture & design universe for SHFT+ALT+DEL? Send your tips to people@archpaper.com!
Placeholder Alt Text

SHoP’n the South Street Seaport

Last night,  SHoP's Gregg Pasquarelli presented plans  to Community Board 1 for South Street Seaport's Pier 17. Not surprisingly, the reception was positive. The design is a huge departure from the desolate barn-like mall developed by the Rouse Corporation in the 1980s, where to this day nachos and tropical cocktails remain de rigueur. The new owner, the Howard Hughes Corporation, hopes to bring New Yorkers back to one of the most spectacular sites in town, while welcoming tourists and not quarantining them in a thematic trap. Angelica Trevino and Thorsten Kiefer are SHoP’s project managers. In a telephone interview, Trevino parsed the details... The new pier will contain four stories of retail with a green roof that would hold two pavilions, one for music and the other for a restaurant, and the entire structure features an exposed steel frame. The landscape, designed by James Corner Field Operations, includes the rooftop, a large deck to the north overlooking the Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges, and a plaza to the south. The first two stories of the pier include the ground floor and a mezzanine with two story high glass doors that will slide open vertically. When open, the doors front the glass enclosed second and third stories. Shops on the first two stories set back several feet from the openings. The architects refer to the area as “The Village.” The storefronts in lower the section are a series of shifting volumes clad in wood, textured aluminum and zinc. A large east/west opening runs through the pier forming an extension to the mainland grid, while two diagonal cuts also run through the space so as to open view corridors of the Brooklyn Bridge to the piers. On the East River side of the building, two metal mesh gangplank stairs ascend up from the east/west opening to the glass enclosed third floor. The glass wrapping the third and fourth floors plays with the notion of the pixilation. As support columns are 20 feet apart, five vertical sections, four feet wide, set back a foot and half, then return, set back, and return—lapping to and fro, like East River ripples. A combination of channel glass and vision glass heighten the effect. “We didn’t want it to be a taut glass box,” said Trevino. “We wanted it to have some articulation, to break up the mass and resemble some of the waterfront tectonics.” Inspired by open-air concert hall at Tanglewoood, a rooftop glass enclosure (60’ x120’) will hold and audience of 500 to 600. In warm months, the pavilion doors will open and music will spill onto a rooftop lawn. A smaller pavilion to the east will house a restaurant. To the north of the pier, a plaza by Field Operations called the “North Porch” will provide one of the most iconic views in the city, with Brooklyn Bridge and Manhattan Bridge in the very near foreground. More pixilated patterns fall underfoot in wood, saw cut cobblestone, and solar pavers that absorb light in the day and give off light at night. On the south side Fulton Plaza will be transformed with wood reclaimed from the old pier.
Placeholder Alt Text

Chakrabarti Joins SHoP as Partner

Vishaan Chakrabarti, director of the Columbia Center for Urban Real Estate since 2009, has been appointed a partner at SHoP Architects effective immediately. The seventh partner (and only the second not related to the firm’s founders by blood or marriage), Chakrabarti will focus on large-scale urban projects, drawing on his years of expertise through such on-going endeavors as Related Companies’ involvement with the Moynihan Station project and development at Hudson Yards. (While he will remain director of the Columbia real estate program, he will forgo his consultancy with Related.) “We are thrilled to have Vishaan join the firm. His background and depth of experience allow SHoP to add expertise to our bench while continuing our firm-wide focus on both planning and building,” said William Sharples, SHoP Partner, in a statement, adding that the firm wants now to pay closer attention to the public realm and the consequences of building “through use of public space, density, sustainability, and innovative construction methods.” The aim, according to the press release is “to reinvent urbansim.” Few design professionals have parlayed their careers and urban interests as expertly as Chakrabarti, who served as head of the Manhattan office of the Department of City Planning from 2002 to 2004—heyday of the Doctoroff pro-development years—then became executive vice president of design and planning for Related in 2008 before joining Columbia. A vocal advocate of urban density and public-private partnerships, Chakrabarti wrote in his Country of Cities column—soon to be a book— for the website Urban Omnibus website on such issues as Tokyo as a model of dense development and the ethical binds implicit in energy development, writing in “Spill, Baby, Spill”: “Do we have the strength to reject the threat that is oil, both foreign and domestic? Do we have the vision to recognize that we have seen the enemy, and it is the suburban house? Do we have the will to embrace high-density living as the only solution, the only land use that limits our energy use, our healthcare costs, our vulnerability to petro-dictators, and our free fall into a sprawling national deficit?” In a recent issue, Metropolis magazine named him a “Game Changer of 2012” Chakrabarti joins SHoP Architects now steeped in a number of large-scale projects with urban impacts, ranging from heralded to controversial, from the East River Waterfront and the redevelopment of South Street Seaport to Atlantic Yards. Local projects in the office are for Google, Goldman Sachs, Columbia and the Fashion Institute of Technology, while the firm has also worked abroad on large-scale projects in Japan, China, Korea, and India. Chakrabarti is quoted in the press release announcement: “It is an honor and a thrill for me to join SHoP Architects, a firm that since its inception has redefined practice, and is now poised to design and build some of the most significant large-scale projects in the world. In the urban age that is upon us, we need the very best practitioners and I have long believed that SHoP offers to New York and the world an unsurpassed 21st Century vision of design and technology.”
Placeholder Alt Text

Profile> John D. Cerone & Hashim Sulieman of SHoP Construction

On Feburary 17, John D. Cerone and Hashim Sulieman of SHoP Construction will lead Computational Design & 4D Sequencing, a workshop focusing on parametric modeling as part of DAY 2 of COLLABORATION, a conference on facades and fabrication sponsored by The Architect's Newspaper. John is a Virtual Design & Construction Coordinator and a member of the Advanced Technology Group at SHoP Construction; specializing in Building Information Modeling (BIM), he has helped SHoP develop its technology and process, and served as an Adjunct Professor at the Parsons New School for Design teaching BIM and digital representation. John received his Bachelor of Arts degree from the School of Architecture at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio (2002), and his Master of Architecture degree from the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation at Columbia University (2008). Hashim is a Virtual Design and Construction Manager at SHoP Construction and a member of the Advanced Technology Group. His work at SHoP has focused on implementation of parametric models, BIM, and direct-to-fabrication technology. Hashim has worked at SOM as a Digital Design Specialist and as an Adjunct Assistant Professor at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation’s C-BIP project. SHoP Construction is behind the under-construction Barclay’s Center and Atlantic Yards development site in Brooklyn. The stadium is clad in an undulating steel and glass enclosure made up of 12,000 unique steel latticework panels; to facilitate installation, the firm developed a 4D construction sequencing model of the structure and facade that allows the project team to make informed decisions in real-time as the panels are installed. The first session of their COLLABORATION workshop will focus on parametric modeling that allows design variability and tests the limits of form, and the second session will be a step-by-step guide to 4D construction sequence modeling. Software used will include Catia/Digital Project, Rhinoceros, Navisworks® Manage, Microsoft project, and Microsoft Excel. Register here.
Placeholder Alt Text

Slideshow> SHoP’s Pier 15 Opens to Public

Before all eyes and ears were focused on the mayor's announcement about Cornell and their EDC project upriver, AN was downtown for a much quieter opening of yet another EDC project. Without fanfare, the SHoP-designed Pier 15 opened to the public today. With the exception of another photographer and a family visiting from Spain, we were the only ones at the pier when the security guard unhooked the chain. Across from Maiden Lane, the new pier is an exercise in restraint with two reflective glass pavilions supporting the top half of a bi-level pier. Once common in the Victorian era, bi-level piers are rare today. The upper-level of this pier sports three small rolling lawns, slightly arched in profile, that overlook the East River. The pier adds 50,000 square feet of public space to the East River Waterfront Esplanade. The project, a joint effort with City Planning, stretches from the Battery Park Maritime Building (the Governors Island ferry) to Pier 35,  just north of the Brooklyn Bridge. Of the two lower level pavilions, one will become a restaurant, to be run by the same company that operates as a smaller restaurant nearby in a pavilion on the East River Esplanade. The second lower level pavilion will accommodate a maritime museum. The RFP for the restaurant and marina have yet to be announced. With the work complete, South Street Seaport's Pier 17 appears all the more needy. As AN's Eavesdrop column reported back in July, the city is still in the midst of negotiations with the Howard Hughes Corporation to revamp the dated pier/mall.  SHoP's Gregg Pasquarelli recently told New York magazine that the firm relishes tackling the next stop north.      
Placeholder Alt Text

AN Video> Esplanade Walk-Through with Amanda Burden

On Thursday, the East River Waterfront Esplanade officially opened to the public. Last week, while the paint on the new bike lanes was still drying, City Planning Commissioner Amanda Burden took AN on a walk through of the first section.  The commissioner barely contained her excitement while showing off design details by landscape architect Ken Smith and SHoP Architects. Follow the commissioner as she takes us through the dog run and points out clever details like the "Get-Downs,"  the riverside bar stools,  and "seat walls."
Placeholder Alt Text

In Construction> Atlantic Yards Update

With the exception of the World Trade Center, there's probably no better place to call a press conference dealing with construction issues than Atlantic Yards. At the moment the controversial project practically guarantees a large press turnout. On Tuesday, the Department of Buildings used the site as a backdrop to launch a new safety campaign for the 7th Annual Workers Safety Week with a particular focus on getting workers to wear harnesses. Sixteen workers have fallen to their death since 2008, prompting the agency to call the campaign "Experience is Not Enough."  In addition to covering the initiative, the press also got a chance to check out progress at the stadium site from "court level." But while DOB officials talked safety on the site, off site Dean Street Alliance president Peter Krashes complained that there were still problems for workers and neighbors. "If the community is affected, then the workers must be, too," he said of dust and noise. "The problem with Atlantic Yards is there are holes in oversight by the Empire State Development Corporation." Still, Krashes did not hold the DOB directly accountable. "This is not a criticism of DOB, in many respects they've been responsive to us." DOB's Acting First Deputy Commissioner Thomas Fariello said they chose the site for the safety-themed event because DOB wanted to highlight "the guys that are doing it right." He added they wanted to get the message out to some of the old timers who have been on the job for 20 to 30 years. "We're trying to report any incident that happens on a site," he said. "It doesn't matter if its union or non union."  To that end, thousands of campaign posters will be distributed to sites throughout the city translated into Russian, Chinese, Spanish, and Polish. Also on hand was Linda Chiarelli, deputy director of construction for Forest City Ratner. She stopped by to check on progress and talked about the rusted steel curtain wall designed by SHoP Architects. Chiarelli was on her way to Indianapolis, where the steel panels are being produced, then shipped to New York as assembled units and fastened to the building frame. She said they hope to have a mock-up unit two blocks away within two months. She described the appearance of the wet and dry cycle machine being used to accelerate panel rust as looking like "a giant dry cleaning machine." With over 11,000 distinct panels to process, one hopes they don't lose any tickets.
Placeholder Alt Text

QUICK CLICKS> Support, Prefab, Wright, Genius

Shigeru Ban's Tokyo office is developing temporary housing structures for those displaced by the natural disaster in Japan, reports Archinect; click here to help support the project. Stateside, AIA president Clark Manus issues a statement encouraging U.S. architects to do all they can to support Japanese recovery efforts. The New York Times covers Forest City Ratner's plan to use prefab building components for a 34-story apartment building at Atlantic Yards in Brooklyn. Engineered by Arup and designed by SHoP, the units should be pretty high-end as far as modular housing goes, but construction workers argue that the prefab approach will mean less jobs. The Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy trumpets the news that twelve of the master's houses are currently on the market (starting at $800k for the Arnold and Lora Jackson House in Beaver Dam, WI), via Design Crave. Acorn Media announces that the acclaimed BBC "Genius of Design" series is available on DVD. The five part documentary focuses on the highlights of industrial design throughout the twentieth century and beyond.      
Placeholder Alt Text

Mixed Media> SHoP Talk: Botswana Innovation Hub

With over 270,000 square feet and costs projected at $50 million, the Botswana Information Hub is ambitious on many levels, both literally and figuratively. The winner of an international competition, the SHoP-designed research campus brings green technology to the Gaborone, Botswana. The sinuous structure merges into the landscape, with various levels seeming to kinetically lift from the earth. An "energy blanket" roofscape blends solar and water re-use systems into the sweeping composition. Gregg Pasquarelli tells AN all about it. AN Mixed Media> SHoP in Botswana from Architect's Newspaper on Vimeo.
Placeholder Alt Text

Quick Clicks> Barrios, Shopping Atlantic, Blah, Egypt

Barrios with Altitude. A poetic study of the organically evolving perimeter of Bogotá, via Lebbeus Woods. Atlantic Aspirations. Forest City Ratner is still on the hunt for Atlantic Yards funding, but has sweetened the deal by tapping SHoP--who is already spiffing up the stadium and public plaza--to design B2, the first apartment building in the complex, says The Observer. Sterile Street. Blair Kamin calls out developer Joe Sitt for obliterating "bracing history" in exchange for "bland consistency" on State Street, in The Chicago Times. Impromptu Planning. In Egypt, protesters have organized a mini-city in Tahir Square, complete with urban planners. Listen to an NPR audio clip or read the related transcript.
Placeholder Alt Text

AAF Says Brava to Burden with Keystone Award

Last weekend in Washington, D.C. the American Architecture Foundation (AAF) presented New York City Planning Commissioner Amanda Burden with its 2011 Keystone Award. The annual accolade is bestowed upon an individual or organization from outside the architectural discipline for exemplary leadership in design, specifically design efforts focused on improving lives and transforming communities. Burden, who has served as chair of the City Planning Commission and director of the Department of City Planning since 2002, recently returned from travels abroad, and AN caught up with her just before the awards ceremony to hear what she thinks New York can learn from cities like Barcelona and other street smarts. “To be a dynamic, competitive global city, you have to grow and attract both talent and investment. It’s not just about architecture, but public space and the design of the streetscape. It comes down to how the city feels at street level. It has to be walkable and human scale, with trees, amenities, and vitality,” said Burden. “Barcelona, for example, is a city that is doing this brilliantly. Its mayors and its urban design prioritize the primacy of the public realm.” Over the past few decades Barcelona has enlivened its public plazas with sculpture and painting of both Spanish and foreign artists. Burden’s curbside view stands in contrast to that of her most (in)famous predecessor, Robert Moses, who, ruled planning in New York City from the mid-1930s through the mid-1960s. “In that era, there was emphasis on large-scale connectivity. Design plans were drawn from a helicopter range, 400 or 500 feet in the air. But you have to go from the grand scale down to the neighborhood, the pedestrian scale, and even think about the speed at which pedestrians walk,” said Burden. Burden cites the redesign of Columbus Circle as successful public space in the city, noting its variety of seating, and she is eagerly anticipating the completion of the East River Esplanade (see more on SHoP’s plans here), where park-goers will have seating options galore: they can stretch out on lawns, sunbathe on chaise lounges, or contemplate river currents from bar seating and swings at the waters edge. Thinking of traffic in terms of people, rather than cars, is something Burden attributes to her mentor William H. ("Holly") Whyte, the urbanist and journalist known for his seminal studies of how people use urban public spaces. Whyte, who died in 1999, the same the year the AAF founded the Keystone Awards, surely would have been a contender for the honor himself. Since 1999,  Keystone Award recipients include Mayor Richard M. Daley of Chicago, Mayor Joseph P. Riley Jr. of Charleston, S.C., the Museum of Modern Art, Save America’s Treasures, and the Pritzker Family of Chicago.