Posts tagged with "Shipyards":

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David Adjaye to master plan expansive San Francisco waterfront development

Just recently it was announced that David Adjaye, founder of London and New York-based Adjaye Associates, will helm The San Francisco Shipyard development. According to The Registry, he will be the project's "master plan architect and creative director." This comes on the heels of the National Museum of African History and Culture's opening; that project saw Adjaye as the lead designer working alongside the Freelon Group (now Perkins+Will), Davis Brody Bond, and SmithGroupJJR. The area in question is located southeast of downtown San Francisco in the Hunters Point area. The website of FivePoint, who's developing the project, says The Shipyard "includes approximately 800 acres of bayfront property." The website adds that the site will "include approximately 12,000 homesites and roughly 4.1 million square feet of commercial space, making it one of the largest developments of its kind in the history of San Francisco." A sweeping map on the project's website shows a mix of open spaces—over 350 acres—and low-to-medium rise development with a few towers interspersed. The project's shopping and entertainment component will include "1 million square feet of urban retail" and "gourmet restaurant village" while the arts and innovation neighborhood will feature a "5 million-square-foot waterfront R&D center" and "working studios and exhibition spaces for 300 artists." "Sustainable living" is also a key selling point, with native plant landscaping, the restoration of native habitats, and land trails for bikers and runners and water trails for kayakers and canoers. According to The Registry, this is the second phase of the project, with Adjaye's plan building upon the work of New York City-based IBI Architects.
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Four Boston design firms fill the Rose Kennedy Greenway with art at the intersection of architecture

Through September 25th, emerging architects and designers are being celebrated in Boston's 4th Design Biennial. The program features installations, created by four, jury-chosen design firms, exhibited along the Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway Conservancy. “This fourth installment of the Biennial highlights emerging designers who reflect the diversity and vitality of Boston’s academic and professional architectural scenes,” explained Chris Grimley, one of the exhibition’s curators. “At a time when the mayor has brought forth much-needed questions about the quality of buildings being produced in the city, the Biennial demonstrates how Boston’s new design talent can be drawn on for its innovative thinking and ability to respond to the challenges we will face in the future.” Over the years, 23 winners have had the privilege of showcasing their work in the event, which represents Boston's finest up-and-coming designers and architects. Among the winners from this year's Biennial are GLD Architecture, MASS Design Group, Cristina Parreño Architecture, and Landing Studio. Each design firm created site specific installations that are sure to make a typical walk along the highway-topping park an atypical one. Made from eight Boston Harbor shipyard recycled oak pilings, Marginal by Landing Studio (pictured at top) calls on a nautical New England from its industrial shipping era. This 18-figured installation was sliced into more than a thousand 2-inch thick cross-section pieces. Each piece is divided into three types—Rounds, Chewies (ends slightly chipped and chomped away), and oblongs—then stacked to form this totem pole–styled installation. GLD created a softer, almost dreamlike piece. What appears to be a cross-pollination between a mushroom and a massive jellyfish, the Grove is a fused resin and fiberglass shell that is said to create a "strangely intimate new enclosure in an open public landscape," as stated on the Boston Biennial's website. Other installations include Cristina Parreño's Tectonics of Transparency: The Tower, a 17 foot installation composed of 350 compressed glass blocks resembling a mini skyscraper and MASS Design Group's Lo-Fab, which is made of more than a thousand wood and metal components that transform into a geodesic hemisphere serving as an impressive gathering space. Learn more about the Design Biennial Boston on its website.
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Brooklyn Navy Yards’ Concrete Monolith To See Major Renovation

The Brooklyn Navy Yard has emerged as one of those rare, post-industrial-era success stories. The former shipyard, which closed in 1966, is now home to a mix of industries such as construction, cleantech, metal fabrication, film production, design, contracting, and even urban agriculture. The Wall Street Journal reported that the non-profit Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corp. will soon announce an $80 million renovation of Building 77, a monolithic concrete former ammunition depot and the largest structure on the 300-acre park. Jack Basch plans on relocating his company, Shiel Medical Laboratory, from one building on the yard into Building 77. He will occupy 240,000-square-feet of space, and then rent out 180,000-square-feet to companies in his industry. Basch expects this move will allow him to add up to 400 jobs. Renovation of the 16-story tower, which has been vacant for half a century, is expected to present unique challenges, including boring through 2-foot-thick concrete walls to add new windows. This continued investment in the Navy Yard might be well worth it. According to a study by the Pratt Center, the “Navy Yard generates $2 billion in economic output and sustains 10,000 jobs and $390 million in earnings each year.”