Posts tagged with "Shadows":

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This 3D-printed sundial casts a shadow that looks like a digital clock

Even for the old-school sundial, analog is out and digital is in, in a manner of speaking. French Etsy retailer Mojoptix has created a 3D-printed sundial that uses an intricate system of holes to display time like a digital clock, no batteries needed. Using an extraordinarily articulated dial, the apparatus uses light and shadow to display the time in 20-minute increments between 10:00a.m. and 4:00p.m. Mojoptix's not-so-digital sundial takes 35-hours to print and each one is made individually, something the shop describes as requiring "a lot of patience." Fulfilling your sundial trivia needs, Mojoptix's device is technically a "gnomon," the shadow-casting portion of the ancient tool. The company prints these gnomons on Ultimaker 2 3D printers using 0.1mm and 0.2mm layers of ABS plastic. "No batteries, no motor, no electronics... It's all just a really super-fancy shadow show," says Mojoptix. "The shape of the sundial has been mathematically designed to only let through the right sunrays at the right time/angle. This allows to display the actual time with sunlit digits inside the sundial's shadow." https://youtu.be/wrsje5It_UU
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Boston Arch Taking Off?

UPDATE: Yanni Tsipis, a Chiofaro critic, counters: "In addition to the 625 foot limit on the Harbor Garage site, which was to be expected, note that [Massport flight paths] would also allow a 900 foot building in the middle of the Boston Common or a 1,000 foot building in the middle of the historic Back Bay brownstone district... certainly doesn't mean any of these would be a good idea!" Ever since the Boston Redevelopment Authority finalized its study setting heights along the post-Big Dig Rose Kennedy Greenway, the fate of developer Don Chiofaro's Boston Arch has been very much in question. The city is recommending no more than two towers rising to 200 feet on the site, saying it will cast shadows on the politically sensitive park. This did not prevent Chiofaro from presenting his own claims earlier in the month that the 40-story office and 59-story residential towers designed by KPF that he wants to build will have no negative impacts, that the claims are overblown. Now, Massport, which oversees Logan airport, certified its earlier pronouncement that the project could not exceed 625 feet, a concession Chiofaro has already made by excising a skyframe—the nominal Arch—from the project. While flight paths and shadows have nothing to do with each other, the hard charging developer will no doubt use this latest vote as one in his favor.