Posts tagged with "sedum":

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Take a trip up onto the Barclays Center’s green roof, where sedum installation is over half complete

When The Architect’s Newspaper first visited the Barclays Center’s green roof, installation had just begun and there was only one strip of sedum running up the arena. Now, six weeks later, sedum covers more than 50 percent of the roof, and, without being too hyperbolic about things, it's looking like a verdant hillside up there. On a visit to the Barclays Center this week, Linda Chiarelli, Deputy Director of Construction for Forest City Ratner, told AN that the roof's 135,000 square feet of sedum should all be in place by the end of July. The green plant is especially hardy and does not need an elaborate irrigation system. (There are four hose bibs on the roof just in case of a drought situation.) The full green roof project, which requires some additional architectural and engineering work, is on track to wrap up in September. The three-acre space will not be open to the public, but rather is designed to absorb rainwater and keep excess noise from escaping the arena. https://vimeo.com/128175007 For much more on the Barclays Center's green roof, be sure to watch our video above, and to see where things stand today, check out the gallery below.
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Barclays Center’s Bald Spot to Get Green-Roof Toupee

Over one-hundred-thousand-square-feet of sedum will be implanted into the Barclays Center’s massive, logo-emblazoned, bald-spot of a roof. According to the Wall Street Journal, SHoP is designing the green topper for the one billion dollar arena. Plans for a public green space on top of the arena date back over a decade, but were later scrapped due to cost constraints. But, now, Atlantic Yards developer Forest City Ratner has revived the plan—sort of. The green roof won’t so much be a public space, as it will be a marketing tool. Ratner representatives told the Journal that the new roof will help entice prospective tenants into the apartments rising around the center. Turns out, a green roof provides a better view than a Barclays logo. They also claim that the green roof will cut down on noise from concerts, which have been much louder than the developer expected.
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Product> Let It Pour: Eight of the Leading Green Roof & Subsurface Components

Nothing says "sustainable architecture quite like a green roof. AN has rounded up eight of the latest green roof and subsurface components that the pros use to seal out, drain, or retail water, like the Green Roof Blocks system (above) by Green Roof Blocks. The Green Roof Block system is a completely self-contained module made from high-grade anodized aluminum. It can be pre-planted with a growth medium that the company guarantees will never break down. Built-in drainage and convenient handles make the units easy to install. Extensive Green Roof System Green Roof Solutions This four-inch extensive green roof system can absorb 60 percent to 90 percent of a one-inch storm event and can delay runoff of over 6,200 gallons on a 10,000-square-foot roof. Green Roof Solutions also offers electronic leak testing to ensure that your roof is airtight before you begin planting. Extensive MC Rooflite This extensive green roof growing medium features a precisely balanced blend of lightweight mineral aggregates and organic components, such as USCC STA-approved compost. Used at Brooklyn Grange and the new Barclays Center, it works in very shallow systems and can drain and retain water simultaneously. Super Pervious Pavers Xeripave With a flow-through rate that exceeds 5,000 inches per hour, Xeripave’s line of super-pervious pavers is suitable for both residential and commercial projects. Storm water is captured and transported to the underlying base of rock where the volume of water is stored, allowing for slower infiltration into the soil below. G476 Waterproofing Membrane Sika Sarnafil Sika Sarnafil's bright orange flagship product is made from specially formulated fiberglass-reinforced thermoplastic that is highly puncture-proof and remains watertight in even the harshest buried environments, resisting high alkalinity, fungi, and bacteria. It also comes in a self-adhesive, foam-backed version. Bio-Module Green Innovations This pre-vegetated modular, interlocking green roof system features integrated irrigation, filter fabric, drainage, and water retention. It also comes in a variety of plantings. At 70 liters per square meter, the Shortgrass Meadow option can handle as many as 100 rainy events per year. Draincore2 Invisible Structures These high-volume geocomposite drainage and conveyance layers can be configured for site-specific flow volumes for advanced subsurface and green roof applications. The drainage core is wrapped in a geotextile fabric that allows water in from any direction and can distribute 42 gallons of water per minute per foot width. Drainage Board Foam Sedum Master Made from 100 percent recycled cross-link, closed cell polyethylene foam with no foreign additives, this mold-resistant, specially blended Drainage Board Foam is bonded with PET filter fabrics and acts as a drainage layer, insulation, and water retention system all in one.
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Quick Clicks> City Atlas, Boathouse Retouch, Urban After Dark, Seasonal Seoul

The City Atlas. The City Atlas is a new online project that seeks to create a platform to share collective imagination that is grounded on past and current accomplishments yet aimed at the future. Check out their website here. Don't Remove, Retouch. This beautifully renovated Norweigian boathouse is still technically un-new. Norwegian architects TYIN tegnestue was committed to reuse as much physical material as possible during the renovation. Images at WorldArchitectureNews. Urban After Dark. According to Chuck Wolfe at myurbanist, a city's true success is best measured at night (hence the quote “cities, like cats, will reveal themselves at night"). Seasonal Sedum. Check out these twelve staggered living roofs in Seoul designed by Joel Sanders Architect in cooperation with Haeahn Architecture. The roofs are planted with flowers (sedum) that bloom at different times of the year-- resulting in changing, seasonal landscapes. See the images on Inhabitat.