Posts tagged with "Sci-Fi":

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Explore three near-future worlds where technology has changed romance (and cities too) in this GSAPP exhibit

Film enthusiasts, sci-fi nerds, architects, and romantics alike will delight in the provocative new exhibition at the GSAPP's Arthur Ross Architecture Gallery. Titled Liam Young: New Romance, it features three remarkable films that explore how technology is changing society and the built environment. New Romance is the product of a collaboration between director Liam Young (an Australian architect-turned-filmmaker) and writer Tim Maughan (a British fiction and non-fiction writer). The exhibition features three films that extrapolate current trends in technology to create near-future sci-fi settings; each film tracks a different kind of romance to explore how technology might shape human relationships and architecture. For instance, In the Robot Skies follows the relationship between two teens—Jazmin and Tamir—living in public housing in London. One teen is under house arrest, so the pair uses hacked drones to pass notes between one another. Shot entirely from the drones' perspectives, viewers see a familiar story of star-crossed lovers from an entirely new vantage point.   The striking Where the City Can't See was shot entirely in LIDAR, a technology used to scan surfaces for digital mapping and navigation. It follows Dexter, a new arrival to Detroit, as his factory coworker Kelis takes him into a community of young people who shield themselves from the city's smart sensing technologies. Hidden from Detroit's electronic eyes, they gather to dance, party, and freely express themselves. Lastly, Renderlands explores the fantasy life of Prakash, who works at an anonymous Indian render farm. Prakash uses leftover fragments of digital renderings to build the image of his dream girl, an unnamed American actress, who he meets in a romanticized digital vision of L.A. A peon by day and dreamer by night, Prakash constructs a digital fantasy alternative reality. All three films offer beautifully surreal visuals and a soundtrack by Detroit-based D.J. Stingray to match. However, Young and Maughan contend that these films don't depict dystopias in the conventional sense: these worlds are extrapolations of the "trends and weak signals" the duo have already detected in the real world, especially in parts outside the developed West. As Young put it in a panel discussion before New Romance's premier, he and Maughan seek to "embed critical ideas about the present in fiction." The films use romance as a means to "find the emotional potential and drama in the everyday," making the work more accessible to a general audience in the process. There is certainly an activist element to these films. Young described how their goal is to "exaggerate [the effects of technology] to the point that you can't ignore it." Drones, smart city technology, digital renderings—all are essential to the film's "world building" and the relationships between the characters. "You can't separate technology and culture," he added, "we're prototyping those cultures, those subcultures." Liam Young: New Romance runs through May 13, 2017, at the Arthur Ross Architecture Gallery at Columbia University. For more on Young, whose previous projects include New City series, matte animations that explore similar near-future worlds, see his Vimeo page here. More on Maughan (who also contributed to the New City series) can be found here.
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Winners of the 2013 eVolo Skyscraper Competition Announced

The winners of eVolo magazine’s 7th Skyscraper Competition have been announced!  This year the publication, which has hosted the prestigious competition since 2006, received 625 submissions from 83 different countries, but only 3 of the most thought-provoking projects were selected as the winners. From floating (on-water and in-midair) skyscrapers to morphing structures, each of these futuristic designs not only resembles something out of a sci-fi film, but more importantly, radically defies our understanding of vertical architecture, creatively explores new technologies, and proposes solutions for a more sustainable urban future. First Place: “Polar Umbrella” (Pictured at top) Derek Pirozzi United States Pirozzi’s ambitious design not only addresses issues of global warming but also aims to rebuild the arctic ice caps.  According to eVolo Magazine, “The Polar Umbrella’s buoyant super-structure becomes a statement for the prevention of future depletion of our protective arctic region. Through its desalinization and power facilities, this arctic skyscraper becomes a floating metropolis equipped with NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) research laboratories, renewable power stations, dormitory-style housing units, eco-tourist attractions, and ecological habitats for wildlife. A series of these structures would be strategically located in the most affected areas.” Second Place: “Phobia Skyscraper” Darius Maikoff and Elodie Godo France With their innovative design for the “Phobia Skyscraper” Maikoff and Godo have envisioned a residential development constructed out of reconfigurable recycled industrial materials that, according to eVolo Magazine, “seeks to revitalize an abandoned industrial area of Paris, France, through an ingenious system of prefabricated housing units. Its modularity allows for a differentiation of various programs and evolution in time.” Third Place: “Light Park” Ting Xu and Yiming Chen China Xu and Chen’s design for “Light Park” endeavors to ameliorate Beijing’s issue of traffic and overpopulation.  As said by eVolo Magazine, “One way to make scarce green and recreation space available to residents of [Beijing] is a skyscraper that floats above the land, taking new development to the sky. The Light Park stays afloat thanks to a large, mushroom cap-like helium-filled balloon at its top, and solar-powered propellers directly below. Programmatic platforms that host parks, sports fields, green houses, restaurants, and other uses are suspended from the top of the structure by reinforced steel cables; the platforms fan in different directions around the spherical vessel to balance its weight. These slabs are also staggered to allow for maximum exposure to sunlight on each level.” Honorable mentions were given to several other commendable projects, including but not limited to “a pH conditioner skyscraper that resembles a jellyfish and purifies polluted air,” a “volcano skyscraper that harvests geothermal energy,” and “a cluster of artificial islands that create the 7th continent in the Pacific Ocean.” A gallery of the Honorable Mention winners; more information of each of the Honorable Mention projects available on eVolo. Click on a thumbnail to launch the slideshow. All images courtesy eVolo.