Posts tagged with "Scandinavia":

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Schmidt Hammer Lassen designs a Danish residential complex with green facades inspired by a local ivy-covered school

Last week, Scandinavian firm Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects announced another win. The firm will design a new residential development, Valdemars Have, in the heart of Aarhus, the second largest city in Denmark. "Resting on a sloping terrain in a tranquil location within walking distance of Aarhus’ major cultural attractions, Valdemars Have will become a prime location for those seeking an oasis of calm within the bustling city," says the firm. The development will contain 106 apartments, ranging from 2-bedroom apartments to large penthouses with private roof terraces. According to Schmidt Hammer Lassen, the buildings modernly interpret traditional, red brick townhouses, by playfully arranging the masonry and balconies. The brick, will vary from light red to nearly black, in order to blend with the older context. The planted exterior facade was influenced by the neighboring Brobjerg school, covered in ivy. Schmidt Hammer Lassen said, "The green facade gives the project a unique look and enhances the experience of a building 'planted' within a garden, where the landscape and the green elements give character and identity to the building." The development is broken down into two east-west buildings, six levels each. Along the neighboring street, Valdemarsgade, the development lowers to four levels to meet the surrounding condition. According to the firm, the development's organization ensures optimal daylight from all directions, and the north side promenades, which will replace the existing paths, ensure the public will feel welcomed to explore the garden-like development.
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Snøhetta’s exhibit at Berlin’s Aedes explores natural light and human habitat in Norway

The current focus on research in architectural practice normally means thinking out the design and materials of an upcoming project or a prototype for a hoped-for commission. But when Norwegian and American firm Snøhetta was given the chance to do a research project by the Zumtobel Group they created Living The Nordic Light, and it became an exhibition at Berlin’s Aedes Architecture Forum. Snøhetta joined with artists, writers, and research institutions to investigate 
the relationship between natural light, people, and habitat in the northern region of Norway. By interviewing four centenarians living their entire lives above the Arctic Circle, they explored the irrevocable and inherent relationships of light and darkness, lived time, and individual perceptions of these relationships. It’s not the sort of research that has a direct relationship to building practice but will surely influence the intelligence with which the firm conceptualizes architectural projects and issues. A catalogue which is part of Zumtobel's annual report—a model which we wish was picked up by American companies—is available at Aedes. The exhibition is open at Aedes until October 1, 2015.