Posts tagged with "sao paulo":

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UVA School of Architecture appoints Felipe Correa as new Chair of Architecture

The University of Virginia School of Architecture has appointed Felipe Correa as the Vincent and Eleanor Shea Professor and new chair of architecture. Correa is currently an Associate Professor and Director of the Master of Architecture in Urban Design program at the Graduate School of Design of Harvard University. He will start the new position on July 25. Felipe Correa is a renowned architect, urbanist, author and professor. He founded and manages Somatic Collaborative, a research-based architecture, landscape and urbanism studio based in New York and Quito, Ecuador. Correa has been teaching at Harvard since 2008. Since 2009, he has served as director of the MAUD program of the GSD. His research, design and writing have been distributed widely. At Harvard, Correa was the co-founder and Principal Investigator of the South America Project, a trans-disciplinary platform that studies design issues of the South American continent. Correa is also releasing a new book in October titled the São Paulo: A Graphic Biography, which interrogates the Brazilian city’s fast-paced growth and socio-economic divide between the city’s financial center and its periphery in the post-industrial context. “As one of the leading scholars on architecture and urban design in Latin America, Felipe brings a wealth of knowledge, creativity and experience to UVA,” said Ila Berman, Dean of the School of Architecture, in a press release. “He will be a tremendous addition to the leadership team of the Architecture School and we’re extremely excited to welcome him to the community.” Correa succeeds Bill Sherman, Lawrence Lewis, Jr. Eminent Scholar Professor and current chair of architecture.  
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Triptyque unveils São Paulo’s minhocão garden viaduct plans

  Brazilian and French firm Triptyque has unveiled their plans for a 2.2 mile vegetated viaduct in São Paulo, Brazil. Originally constructed in 1971, the Minhocão viaduct paved the way for modern automotive travel within the city. Now, despite being closed to vehicles between 9.30 p.m. and 6.30 a.m. and on all day Sundays, the area has become the heavily polluted.  Triptyque's green solution then, is fitting. As the city attempts to reclaim the highway, leasing it out to pedestrians, Triptyque has proposed lining the viaduct with dashes of greenery and vegetation to make it a more inviting space. Working alongside landscaper Guild Blanche, the scheme focuses on the Minhocão Marquise, the area underneath the roadway itself. Here, they envision a communal space for art, sports, and special events, with Triptyque driving home the idea that color and vibrancy are key components of the project. In doing so, they hope to counter the grayness of São Paulo and create a lively and pedestrian-friendly place. As part of the plan, the Marquise will be divided into blocks, each located within the 108 foot gaps between each pillar. These blocks will be numbered and labeled as the "posts" corresponding the beaches of Rio de Janeiro. As a result, each block will receive four programs: "culture, food, services and shops." These activities will be governed by a public-private partnership in which the São Paulo mayor and city authorities will play a curatorial role and oversee the general scheme. Light is also an important factor. Due to the nature of the site, little daylight enters the space. Vegetation will have to hangover the edges or be suspended in order to grow. This, however, works in the scheme's favor with greenery able to to filter 20% of carbon dioxide pollution from the cars above. Plants will be irrigated via a natural water harvesting system, meanwhile residual/excess water will be used to clean the Marquise surface. https://vimeo.com/160749242
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Restaurant Without Walls: Using vegetation and materials to divide spaces

Piselli, one of the most acclaimed restaurants in São Paulo, will open in Iguatemi’s central plaza, the oldest Brazilian mall in operation and a popular Sao Paulo interior public space. Eric Carlson and his office CARBONDALE designed this “restaurant without walls,” using vegetation and materials to divide spaces. Situated in a 32,000 square-foot, 4-story-high interior plaza lined with travertine stone and naturally illuminated with a sculptural skylight, CARBONDALE's restaurant is wrapped with vertical, gold-plated brass-bars. Carlson gave the restaurant open views of the garden, along with natural ventilation and light. A rise in the cumaru wood parquet flooring distinguishes the restaurant from the plaza. The ceiling, a polished and lacquered smoked cedar wood, reflects the vegetation, making the height of the 20-foot-tall space appear more expansive. The vertical, wood frames, infilled with a brass mesh, subdivide the space, giving it depth and adding a sense of shade. CARBONDALE calls this result a “Restaurant in the Garden.” Carlson said in Portuguese, "If I had to choose a Brazilian common feature I would say the importance of nature and greenery.” And Piselli adds this exact cultural and social element to the Iguatemi shopping center. Iguatemi's Piselli and Plaza, both designed by CARBONDALE, are great steps towards introducing customized design to shopping centers, where architecture does not always fit cultural and social factors.