Posts tagged with "Santa Monica":

Placeholder Alt Text

Broad Chooses Santa Monica?

According to the Santa Monica Daily Press (via our senseis at Curbed) Santa Monica has basically claimed victory in its battle against Beverly Hills for Eli Broad's new contemporary art museum. According to the story the Santa Monica City Council could vote on the deal as soon as this Tuesday. "I feel that the vast majority of issues have been discussed thoroughly and agreed to," City Councilman Bob Holbrook told the Daily Press. Meanwhile in Beverly Hills city spokeswoman Cheryl Burnett told the Daily Press she wasn't aware of any new developments in negotiations with the Broad Foundations. Doesn't look good for Beverly Hills.. We've called the city of Santa Monica to try to confirm, but have thus far gotten no answers. If built the Santa Monica museum would be located on a 2.5 acre parcel of land facing Main Street between the Santa Monica Courthouse and Civic Auditorium. It would become the permanent home for the Broad Collections, which contain over 2,000 artworks. The building would also house a research and study center as well as the foundation’s administrative headquarters. The foundation now uses a renovated 1927 building in Santa Monica, housing offices and a gallery, which is only open by reservation and too small for the sorts of exhibitions Broad has said he would like to host.
Placeholder Alt Text

Broad Museum: 90210 vs 90402

After making nary a peep about his proposed Beverly Hills museum since last April, Eli Broad is again making it clear that he wants the project to move forward. And that he wants it to be much bigger. According to the LA Times, a plan sent last month to the Beverly Hills Planning Department calls for nearly 50,000 square feet of exhibition space (including a 6,100 square foot outdoor area for sculpture), up from the 25,000 previously anticipated. According to the story he's also included Santa Monica as a possible contender for the museum, for which he would create a $200 million endowment. And now the cities are jockeying for position: Kevin McKeown, a Santa Monica city councilman, told the Times, "I'll do everything I can to make this happen." Meanwhile Cheryl Burnett, the city of Beverly Hills' spokeswoman, issued a statement saying, "While we recognize that the Broad Foundation has many options. . . . There's no better place than Beverly Hills to showcase this world-class contemporary art collection." Let..the..fireworks..begin.
Placeholder Alt Text

When SCI-Arc Had Soul

We recently noted the impending demise of SCI-Arc's original building in Santa Monica, which the school's founder, Ray Kappe, didn't consider much of a loss. As he put it, referring to renovations subsequent to SCI-Arc's departure, the building "had good character, but now it’s got dumb character." We didn't exactly get what he meant, but then the fine folks at Archinect were kind enough to link to our story, and therein occasional AN contributor Orhan Ayyüce posted some pics from his time at SCI-Arc back in the day, some of which we've posted here (click the above link to see the rest). Now we get it, are kinda sorry we missed it, and sorry to see it go.
Placeholder Alt Text

So Long SCI-Arc

"I hadn't even heard about it," Ray Kappe told us when we called him to find out about an item in Curbed the other day noting that the Santa Monica City Council had overturned a ruling by the Landmarks Commission that would have designated SCI-Arc's original home as a historical icon worthy of preservation. Kappe, who founded the school in 1972 at a 1950s industrial building at 3030-3060 Nebraska Avenue [map], actually sided with the council in its decision, calling the building "messed up completely." He said it used to sport "a pretty good 30s modern look. It had good character, but now it's got dumb character." That's because at one point the landlord replaced the ribbon windows with generics, among other changes. According to Curbed, "The city's Landmarks Commission made the site a landmark in February 2008 based on its relationship with SCI-Arc and Kappe, its reflection of the neighborhood's development, and its architectural merits, which include what the Commission's action says is a 'late Bauhaus, mid-century fenestration pattern.'" But now, the council has overturned that decision because, according to a staff report, "The structure is a common example of a utilitarian, vernacular industrial building that has been significantly altered. It is not unique in design or rare architecturally." With appeal in hand, Curbed speculates new owners NMS Properties are going to build apartments on the site, which Kappe thought was a fine idea. "The building was good and it served its purpose, but I don't think it should stand in the way of somebody's development," he said. Might we suggest a certain Southern California architect educator for the job of building NMS' new apartments?