Posts tagged with "San Francisco":

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Gustafson Guthrie Nichol to design San Francisco Shoreline Parks at the India Basin Waterfront

Seattle-based Gustafson Guthrie Nichol (GGN) will design Shoreline Parks and 900 Innes along the India Basin coastline. GGN was awarded the commission after coming first in the design ideas competition put forward by the San Francisco Recreation & Parks Department and the Trust for Public Land, in partnership with the San Francisco Parks Alliance.

According to the brief, the competition encouraged candidates to "reimagine" the two locations around India Basin Shoreline Park in order to establish a "spectacular and seamless 1.5-mile-long network of public parks on the City’s southeast shoreline."

Well-recognized in the field of landscape architecture, the firm already has designed the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation campus in Seattle, the Lurie Garden at Millennium Park in Chicago, North End Parks in Boston.

The India Basin Waterfront Parks, Trails and Open Space Plan, a public-private planning consortium is also underway, taking a regulatory stance to safeguard the project and make sure that the developments  "along the 1.5-mile shoreline eventually look, feel and operate as a coherent, comprehensive, and integrated parks system."

“As our City continues to grow, we are committed to the sustainability of our City by making investments in parkland that enhance our world class waterfront,” said San Francisco mayor Ed Lee in a press release. “I’m pleased with the progress of the India Basin Waterfront that ensures a legacy for future generations to come.” 

GGN fought off competition from 19 other proposals including one from AECOM and a joint submission from SWA and Stanley Saitowitz/Natoma Architects. A PDF, part of GGN's winning submission, can be found here.

“We are honored to be entrusted to work with India Basin's neighbors and visitors, to enhance the things that people already treasure about this gem of a site,” said founding principal of GGN, Shannon Nichol. “India Basin includes a rare expanse of original tideflats and preserved boatyard architecture. Our approach to the competition further softened the shoreline, added walking routes across Innes Avenue between the water and the neighborhood, and sized the park's spaces for everyday activities. We look forward to working with the community to test and hone that initial approach with the full input of neighbors and the people who will be using this park every day.”

Situated in a remote untouched alcove of San Francisco, the brownfield site that is the India Basin offers rare opportunity for the city to confront environmental and ecological issues with the implementation of a park complex. Currently, the site has little to offer in the way of amenities, but landscape development could see an influx of visitors to the area, to which business would undoubtedly follow. 

As for the competition, five necessities were put in place. These included continuous connector trails, bike paths, increased access to the shoreline, and enhanced habitats and gathering spaces. As for the historic landmark of the Shipwright’s Cottage at 900 Innes, submissions required a brief outline of how this would be restored. After being announced as winners, GGN will seek to install a "21st-century legacy park" with particular focus on "public access, recreation, resiliency, and habitat enhancement."  

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wHY’s Kulapat Yantrasast to expand San Francisco’s Asian Art Museum

Kulapat Yantrasast, a principal of Los Angeles– and New York City–based architecture firm wHY, will design a 9,000-square-foot addition to the Asian Art Museum (AAM) of San Francisco. The addition, a pavilion, will unify gallery spaces on the east side of the museum's first floor, and allow the AAM to display more contemporary art. It will be situated atop a wing on the Hyde Street side that dates to the 1990s. Yantrasast will also rework the museum's galleries to create a more legible layout, allowing more of the 18,000-piece permanent collection to be put on display, as well as permitting more special exhibition programming. Educational spaces will be updated to accommodate increasing attendance. Currently 35,000 Bay Area students visit the AAM each year, although that number is expected to rise to 50,000 once classroom spaces are upgraded. wHY has two museum projects wrapping up in 2016. The firm's addition to the  in Louisville will be complete this month, while the Marciano Art Foundation, a conversion of a Los Angeles Scottish Rite Masonic Temple into a private art center, should open this September. Right now, the $25 million AAM project is in the schematic design phase, and construction is set to begin next year.
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San Francisco seeking enhanced landmark protection for one of Frank Lloyd Wright’s most significant works

A gestural ramp takes visitors to the upper stories, passing objets d'art nested into built-in niches. A bubbled skylight lets the sun's rays penetrate into an expansive atrium, even on cloudy days. The AIA says the landmarked building is one of Frank Lloyd Wright's 17 essential works. The Guggenheim? Not so much. Wright's only San Francisco building, a city landmark since 1974, sits on Maiden Lane, a quiet side street downtown. The last tenant, Xanadu Gallery, closed up shop last year. Before the next tenant moves in, preservationists are rallying to expand existing landmark protections to include parts of the interior that date to 1948, including the ceiling, a skylit plane comprised of 120 acrylic domes, mahogany display cabinets, and a brass hanging planter. Wright designed the project, one of his only renovations of an existing building, in 1948 for V.C. and Lillian Morris. The couple had a shop on the same street and had previously commissioned Wright to design four houses for them (none were built). The space became the home of the V.C. Morris Gift Shop. Although the exterior, whose arch could be a subtle tribute to Louis Sullivan, is elegant, Wright experts concede that the interior is more architecturally significant. 140 Maiden Lane was a real-world test for the Guggenheim, built in 1959, which Wright conceptualized sixteen years earlier. The skylight hints at Wright's later work, like the 1961 Marin County Civic Center. The Prairie-style homes Wright completed in the Chicago suburbs are echoed in the masonry cliff, muses John King, The San Francisco Chronicle’s urban design critic. When Xanadu Gallery moved into the space in 1997, the owners, Raymond and Marsha Handley, restored many of the interior details that were left to languish in the basement. They consulted preservation experts, including Aaron Green, who with Wright collaborated on the Marin Civic Center. Marsha feels confident that the new owner, a Hong Kong–based investor who also owns Los Angeles's Bradbury Building, will be mindful of this building's significance. It's rumored that the new tenant may be a restaurant, or a European clothing boutique. City Planners have broached the bid for elevated landmark status with the owner's representatives, as they intend to send the revised landmark designation to the Planning Commission and Board of Supervisors in the next few months.
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On View> Experiments in Environment: The Halprin Workshops, 1966–1971

Graham.14.1_02_027 Experiments in Environment: The Halprin Workshops, 1966–1971 California Historical Society 678 Mission St., San Francisco Through May 1 From January 21 to May 1, the California Historical Society will exhibit archival documentation of Experiments in Environment, a series of cross-disciplinary workshops organized by Postmodern dance pioneer Anna Halprin and landscape architect Lawrence Halprin during the summers of 1966–1971 in northern California. During the Experiments in Environment workshops, dancers, architects, and environmental designers took part in “altering environments” with movement sessions and collective building projects. The California Historical Society’s exhibit includes original photographs, films, drawings, and scores of these projects. “Drawn from architecture, ecology, music, cinematography, graphics, choreography, and lighting, Experiments in Environment brought together artists, dancers, architects, and environmental designers in avant-garde environmental arts experiences,” said the California Historical Society in a press release. The exhibition was organized by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, Chicago. Visit experiments.californiahistoricalsociety.org/exhibition for more information.
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With lawsuits settled, TEN Arquitectos’ Mexican Museum moves forward in San Francisco

Lawsuits stalling construction of San Francisco’s Mexican Museum and 706 Mission Street high-rise have been settled. Earlier this year AN reported that the museum designed by Mexico City–based TEN Arquitectos and housed in the first four floors of a Handel Architects–designed 47-story condo tower at 706 Mission Street and the restored 1903 Aronson Building, was expected to break ground over the summer. Fights over the height of the tower held construction up of the 54,000-square-foot, $43 million facility and the $305 million, 510-foot-tall condo tower developed by Millennium Partners. Now that the lawsuits brought by neighbors in the nearby Four Seasons building are resolved, a building permit has been issued and the projects can finally move forward. Socketsite reported on the settlement, “Millennium Partners will donate $100,000 to the City to offset the costs of installing a new crosswalk at Third Street and Stevenson and revising the signal timing on Third, assuming the improvements for the residents of the Four Seasons, and others, are approved.” When complete, the Mexican Museum, which sits on a site next to Daniel Libeskind’s Contemporary Jewish Museum, will feature some 14,000 objects related to Mexican and Mexican-American art and culture. These artworks and objects will fill the cantilevered main galleries—a boxy structure clad in a reflective metallic skin, designed with artist Jan Hendrix.
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From Placemaking to Social Media: Takeaways from AIA San Francisco’s NEXT Conference

next-conference The NEXT Conference, sponsored by the AIA San Francisco, just concluded its first year, and The Architect’s Newspaper was there moderating two panels. Day one convened in a historic bayside dock transformed into a children’s Exploratorium. We moderated a session on the urban planning concept of "Placemaking" that featured David Burney, Jennifer Wolch, and two "makers," Anisha Gade and Sue Mark of the firm Marksearch. This relatively new way of thinking about planning, particularly marginalized and rapidly transforming the space of the city, is making inroads into city planning circles and art academies and joining these two practices. David Burney just launched the first academic Placemaking program in the country at Pratt Institute and described how the practice is training students to link policy to the use and ownership of public space. Jennifer Wolch Dean of the College of Environmental Design at Berkeley was more critical and nuanced about Placemaking. She wondered what happens when the makers leave a place and move on to another site? Might this practice inevitably be, Wolch wondered, just another gentrifying agent in an already rapidly changing neighborhood? The two Placemakers Gade and Mark presented their latest North Oakland project, Communities Crossing, that attempts to “reveal a community in search of its identity.” Follow-up questions debated various aspects of the practice but left the gentrification issue unresolved on the table. The audience and panelists from earlier sessions seemed thrilled to be in the company of other practitioners, so the harder questions about the long-term impact of the practice were not addressed. The second day of the conference moved to the sagging modernist San Francisco County Fair Building in Golden Gate Park. In a session labeled "Business," we moderated a panel, Architects & Social Media, with Kenneth Caldwell, Amanda Walter, and architect Mark English. Caldwell a communications consultant to architects argued that designer featured profiles in traditional or “earned” media are difficult to come by and that today most architects would be better served to have a social media strategy targeted to their existing networks. This he considers professional “owned media.” But he argued content in these media streams should be delivered personally to key those contacts nurtured over many years. Walter was more direct. She wrote the book Social Media in Action: Comprehensive Guide for Architecture, Engineering, Planning and Environmental Consulting Firms, which is the bible for design firms trying to figure out marketing. Water claimed they should “consider what issues and challenges their potential clients are looking for online and then develop and share content that helps them." Mark English, a San Francisco architect who specializes in single-family homes and entertainment projects, spends 10 hours a week promoting his practice on various social media sites. He also claimed that he has gotten four major projects in the last year from his personal blog posts and other media posts. This session had a flurry of audience responses and questions to these media professionals from both older architects trying to understand this media landscape and young designers just starting out and wanting to know how to position their firms. Created by the earned media, this panel highlighted the difficulties of owned media. The NEXT Conference was lightly attended and suffered from being staged in two venues (each with its own problems) across the city, but hopefully the organizers will learn from this first event and give San Francisco the professional conference it deserves "NEXT" year.
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Fight over how to use Maybeck’s Palace of Fine Arts reflects San Francisco tensions

A battle is brewing in San Francisco’s Marina District over the fate of the Palace of Fine Arts rotunda and the adjacent structure that formerly housed the Exploratorium. Designed by Bernard Maybeck, the Palace of Fine Arts is a historic remnant of the 1915 Panama Pacific International Exposition, but only the Beaux Arts rotunda and colonnade are designated landmarks. San Francisco’s Recreation and Parks Department is currently vetting long-term tenants for the vacant shed-like building. In June, the commission issued a Request for Concept Proposals and received seven proposals, which included both for- and nonprofit ideas including a hotel, a recreation center, arts and technology lab, a food pavilion, and a museum. This month, the commission narrowed the field to three and a final selection is expected by summer. At issue is whether or not the 144,000-square-foot palace, including the former Exploratorium space and theater will remain an arts and education center open to the public, or if it would house a more commercial enterprise such as a fitness club or hotel. Advocating for the former, S.F. resident Kristen Selberg created an online petition asking for Mayor Ed Lee and the Rec & Parks to preserve the Palace of Fine Arts for cultural use. “These things are important to San Franciscans, especially with what we’re dealing with right now, such rapid change in The City that’s not necessarily for the best,” Selberg told the San Francisco Examiner, conveying a sentiment familiar to many in San Francisco who feel that Mayor Lee is a bit too cozy to private interests. “San Franciscans are just begging to hang on to something for themselves and for The City.”

Celebrating Architectural League Emerging Voices

Timken Lecture Hall, San Francisco Campus

Free and open to the public Reception and book signing to follow discussion More info: architecture@cca.edu

Since 1982, the Architectural League of New York has sponsored Emerging Voices, a juried lecture series recognizing architects, landscape architects, and urban designers whose distinctive voices promise to influence the field of architecture.

This year, the League published 30 Years of Emerging Voices, a survey of honorees with essays interpreting the transformations in architectural discourse, design, and practice that this roster reveals.

Join the conversation by attending this panel discussion featuring principals from all of the Emerging Voices firms currently practicing in the San Francisco Bay Area. Thirteen leading architects and landscape architects will share their current visions for the field and reflect on their practice trajectories in a conversation moderated by Allison Arieff, editorial director at SPUR, and featuring the League’s executive director, Rosalie Genevro, and Emerging Voices program director, Anne Rieselbach. The presenters, many of whom teach at CCA, UC Berkeley, and other schools, are founding principals of some of the Bay Area's most distinguished practices: Anderson Anderson Architecture, Faulders Studio, Fernau & Hartman Architects, Guthrie + Buresh Architects, Iwamoto Scott, Kuth Ranieri Architects, Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects,Ogrydziak Prillinger Architects, Pfau Long Architecture, Rael San Fratello, Stanley Saitowitz | Natoma Architects Inc., SurfaceDesign Inc., and VeeV Design.
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Take a tour inside Snøhetta’s SFMOMA before it opens in May 2016

“The building is not static—it is designed to gracefully mature over time as life and art move forward together,” said Snøhetta’s Craig Dykers poetically wrapped up his opening remarks at the pre-launch event of their heralded new addition to the SFMOMA, which is slated to open May 14, 2016. These words captured well the essence of his presentation, one that focused on the new expansion as a landmark affair in the eighty-year history of the West Coast’s first museum devoted to modern and contemporary art. A development which witnessed an astoundingly successful fundraising campaign that topped off at $610 million which, in addition to covering construction costs, has more than tripled SFMOMA’s endowment. “This expansion enables us to tap more fully into the energy all around us, in a region known for its special creativity and beauty, while greatly increasing the presentations of a collection that includes remarkable concentrations of artworks that can be found nowhere else,” noted museum director Neal Benezra. A hardhat tour of the Snøhetta addition led visitors through a vastly expanded and exploded in scale and breadth building, which highlights new and unique spaces designed to house the large scale projects of modern art such as Richard Serra’s monumental sculpture Sequence (2006) and others. Soon, museum visitors will have access to more outdoor terraces that are scattered throughout the building offering exclusive and exceptional experiences of the downtown San Francisco urban cityscape. Previously a one entrance and exit museum this new building sports multiple access points and talks to current notions of porosity and an opening up of architecture as a fluid and dematerialized experience both programmatically and in the phenomenological. The focal point of the project, of course, is the eastern facade of the Snøhetta expansion, which is comprised of more than 700 individually shaped FRP (fiberglass reinforced polymer) panels fabricated by Kreysler & Associates, a local fabrication shop specializing in composites, affixed to a curtain-wall system, allowed for a much lighter structural frame because of their own lightweight nature, bringing costs down, and highlighting the technological versatility of sustainable, locally sourced materials, and digital fabrication. In celebrating the new building as a space for art, speakers at the topping off event ecstatically showed off new acquisitions their presentations and discussed the unique partnerships that allowed for these enormously expensive works to join the collection. Bob Fisher, the eldest son of Don and Doris Fisher, recounted his parents’ love affair with artwork and how they assembled over 1,100 art pieces that will become the focus point of many of the new exhibitions and offerings at SFMOMA over the next 100 years through an unprecedented public/private partnership. There was much discussion of the finances of the new building in addition to the artwork that has been added to the collection. Charles R. Schwab, chairman of SFMOMA’s Board of Trustees, focused on many of the unique collaborations and joint acquisitions of artwork through unique partnerships with other world renowned museums. Over 500 donors supported the campaign which both raised money and alongside it—the Campaign for Art has secured more than 3,000 artworks from over 200 donors, enhancing key areas of the museum’s holdings and providing visitors with a fuller, more textured view of contemporary art. In addition, the museum has added the Pritzker Center for Photography, the largest gallery, research and interpretive space devoted to photography in any U.S. art museum, and an increase in programs for children and families in the new Koret Education Center. SFMOMA will also now be free to anyone under 18, a gesture aimed at education and increasing accessibility for more kids and families to visit the space, in a time when ticket prices to exclusive culturally rich atmospheres seem to only get more and more expensive. This building sings a new song to the city of San Francisco and the world and one can only hope that more architects and designers (and most apropos developers) press forward with exceptional and forward thinking designs that help craft international and world-class destinations.
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First renderings revealed for SOM’s San Francisco 1500 Mission residential tower [UPDATE]

With backing from developers Related California, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) is moving forward with a new residential tower project at 1500 Mission Street and South Van Ness in the Bay Area of San Francisco. Reaching 39 floors, the tower will hold 560 apartments which will each have an average area of around 730 square feet, replacing the Goodwill Industries currently on site. According to The San Francisco Business Times, 112 of the 560 units are expected to be designated affordable housing spaces available at below the market rates. In an effort to retain the site's heritage, the scheme plans to incorporate the Coca Cola Bottling Plant Clock Tower into its design—a pre-existing feature that was iconic to the site. Also included in the project will be 24,000 square feet of retail and 450,000 square feet of office space of which the clock tower would be integrated into one of the entrances.
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On View> SPUR Urban Center Gallery presents VENUE

VENUE SPUR Urban Center Gallery 654 Mission Street San Francisco Through October 21 The product of an enviable 16-month-long road trip across the United States, VENUE is the documentation of a series of sites from around the country that are not always considered when surveying architecture and design. The successful bloggers Geoff Manaugh (BLDGBLOG) and Nicola Twilley (Edible Geography) tackle “often overlooked yet fascinating sites through the eyes of the innovators, trendsetters, entrepreneurs, and designers at the forefront of ideas today,” giving a more honest assessment of the American landscape then is represented in traditional urban-centric design media. The exhibition and installation includes books, photographs, maps, ephemera, and more. The tour was thoroughly 21st-century, however it was inspired by the great expeditions of the 19th century.
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On View> Architecture & Design Films showcased in San Francisco Festival

All month the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (YBCA) will present its Architecture & Design Films Showcase 2015 in downtown San Francisco, hailed as the West Coast’s largest showcase of architecture and design films. The New Rijksmuseum, a 2013 film directed by Oeke Hoogendijk opened the festival. With clarity and precision the documentary followed the ten year ordeal that was the renovation of the Amsterdam museum and the challenging battle and drama surrounding its reopening. Joel Shepard, YBCA’s film curator, said “this is the second year we’ve presented this very engaging series and it was such a hit last year that we decided to do it again. This time we have even more outstanding films, which were all selected for their diversity as well as because they represent a wide variety of new architecture, design, and related subjects.” Some titles that stand out are Troublemakers: The Story of Land Art, focused on what it’s title straightforwardly lays out, land art, and includes rare footage and interviews of storied artists Robert Smithson (Sprial Jetty), Walter De Maria (The Lightning Field), and Michael Heizer (Double Negative) on October 29 and November 1. Maker, with the director Mu-Ming Tsai in person to present a film that looks into the current maker movement in America—a new wave of do-it-yourself and do-it-together fueled by passion and powered by new technologies, a topic particularly ripe for the Bay Area crowd. Two other titles to take note of are Christiania: 40 Years of Occupation and Making Space, a film that looks at five women changing the face of architecture. The showcase runs through November 8 and takes place at the YBCA Screening Room in San Francisco. A list of the films can be found at on the museum's website. Most show times are Thursday evenings, and Saturday and Sunday afternoons.