Posts tagged with "San Francisco":

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Watch Renzo Piano talk about reinventing the shopping mall in a San Francisco suburb

Last summer, AN reported on Renzo Piano's City Center at Bishop Ranch, the architect's re-invention of the typical shopping center, mixing walkability, culture (including an integrated performance stage), community (including a public "piazza" space") and commerce. In a new short film about the project, Piano spoke about keeping people outside, creating open and transparent storefronts, making a building that will "practically fly above the ground." https://vimeo.com/110900031 The project, located in San Ramon, a remote eastern suburb of San Francisco, centers around the plaza, which is surrounded by six raised glass pavilions. Piano explained how he is creating a suburban building that is nonetheless unpredictable, natural and "very California." "After a while you hear a little bell ringing," explained Piano, of his design process epiphany. "This is not a shopping mall. It's something else."
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Wrapping up CCA’s Data Clay Symposium on combining experimental form with new materials

With the scent of wet St. Louis clay wafting through the air, the Data Clay Symposium kicked off at CCA last weekend. Hosted by the Architecture & Fine Arts Divisions at CCA, the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, and the CCA Digital Craft Lab, the event joined architects, artists, designers, makers, critics and creators to discuss and display their latest syncretic experiments and the possibilities of the seemingly disparate mediums of data (i.e. computation) and clay. Moderated and curated by Joshua G. Stein and Del Harrow, and following on the heels of an exhibition on view at the San Francisco's Museum of Craft & Design, the symposium started with a talk by Future Cities Lab co-founder Jason Johnson and his Creative Architecture Machines research group at CCA, exhibiting student work that integrates robotics, interactivity, coding, and clay extrusions manifested in real time. Ron Rael of UC Berkeley and Emerging Objects followed with his research into Earth Architecture and the ancient strategies of clay building. Walking the line between passive building and high-tech computational techniques with his experiments on evaporative cooling bricks, Rael demonstrated the potential of the ancient and the modern coming together in a coherent and cogent architecture of today. Jenny Sabin of Cornell University and Jenny Sabin Studio presented work connecting biology, coding, and material systems that have fostered her experimental practice, which works at the intersection of rapid-prototyping, scientific exploration, and ceramics. With a BFA in Ceramics and a Masters of Architecture, Sabin has been able to integrate and develop a unique space for a practice that radically combines the digital and the analogue. Andy Brayman, a studio potter of the Kansas City–based Matter Factory, presented his unique take on traditional ceramics and data by showing off his knowledge of code and software platforms through his open-sourced self-education and research developments. The morning session came to a close with work presented by UC Berkeley PhD student Laura Devendorf and her playful syntheses of art practice, technology, and research. Her experiments, work at the intersections of a diverse set of disciplines, presenting innovative promise for the "maker" field.
The afternoon featured a keynote by Dries Verbruggen from Antwerp design studio Unfold. Verbruggen’s talk traced the history of digital design, then referenced his book Printing Things, which investigates the myriad techniques and processes of printing. He touched on notions of copying, iteration, and the physics of the physical world gone digital. One of the most intriguing projects of the symposium, on display at the Museum of Craft and Design, is Unfold's recreation of a potter's throwing wheel in digital form, which can be changed through your hands'  interaction.
Bobby Tigerman, associate curator of decorate arts and design at LACMA, followed, channeled remotely from Los Angeles, with a historical look at issues of technology and the hand-made, ending with a note that digital craft is on the rise and has prompted stimulating debate and connected cultures worldwide. From the History of Art and Architecture department at UC Santa Barabara, Assistant Professor Jenni Sorkin expounded on the nature of open source, and the hotly-debated realm of ownership and originality in object-hood. Wrapping up the Symposium was Stephanie Syjuco, a sculptor and Assistant Professor in the Ceramics department at UC Berkeley. She glided through her own work, focused on clay, data, and large scale installations, synthesizing traditional ceramic techniques and digital software such as Cinema 4D. Ending the day was an engaging debate revolving around disciplinary identity, scales and modes of production, the quality and quantity of education, and the ability of the arts, architecture, and design to make a real difference in the world today.
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Eavesdrop> California’s Olympic Letdown: Los Angeles & San Francisco lose out to Boston

  Alas, despite being hailed as the favorite to represent the United States in the race for the 2024 Olympics, Los Angeles has lost out to its much older competitor, Boston. LA had pitched what Mayor Eric Garcetti hailed as the “most affordable” proposal, using mostly existing facilities, including the LA Memorial Coliseum, the Staples Center, and even Frank Gehry's Disney Hall, Griffith Observatory, and the Queen Mary. Maybe the USOC isn’t as into a bargain as we thought? Or maybe after giving LA two games they’re just not that into us anymore. San Francisco, by the way, lost out on its bid, which also banked on affordability. Damn, the Olympic Village could have been the only cheap place to live there outside of Oakland!
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An unlikely shipping container pop-up plaza is the brainchild of the San Francisco Giants and Gehl Studio

San Francisco's baseball team, the Giants, and Gehl Studio are planning a pop-up shipping container village on a waterfront parking lot just across McCovey Cove from AT&T Park in Mission Bay. The Yard, as the project is being called, will consist of a beer garden, coffee shop, retail stores and a waterfront deck, all on land intended for a 1.7 million square foot mixed-use development called Mission Rock. But until that project begins construction, the 9-acre site, according to Gehl Studio project lead Blaine Merker, will consist of 15 shipping containers salvaged from the Port of Oakland. The containers will line Terry A. Francois Boulevard, some perpendicular to the thoroughfare, some parallel, some stacked one atop the other, and most creating outdoor rooms for congregating. "This is not about a series of buildings, it's an integrated urban design," said Merker. "Our initial inspiration was to create the feeling of a walkable mixed-use street." According to the SF Chronicle, the Giants will spend $2.5 million on the project and pay $77,000 in annual rent to the Port of San Francisco. Until now, the city's most famous pop-up container village was Proxy, in Hayes Valley, designed by Envelope A+D. Plans for The Yard were presented to the Port of San Francisco this week, and the project is expected to open by March, prior to the baseball season.
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Snøhetta continues San Francisco streak with downtown highrise, and the town is talking

The momentum continues in San Francisco for the Norwegian firm Snøhetta with a recently-unveiled tower at the corner of the city's Market Street and Van Ness Avenue. And the project has been garnering some fairly untraditional responses from citizens. As proposed, the curving, 37-story One Van Ness tower would be divided by three large cuts, designed to lessen wind load and provide new common spaces. Paired with SCB, Snøhetta will work to replace a tower originally proposed on the site by Richard Meier and Partners. The building's carved-out center has also provided inspiration for illustrators to poke fun. Illustrator Susie Cagle, who told CityLab that the design reminded her of the last SF boom's "bubble mentality," drew the distressed building on the left, while Twitter user The Tens seems to think the building doesn't much care for its neighborhood, as demonstrated in the image below right. San Francisco Chronicle architecture critic John King took note of the parodies and dubbed theSnøhetta's creation the "Talking Tower." He was quick to add in another tweet that the impromptu naming was "not a critique"—he says he quite likes the tower. AN recently talked to Snøhetta principal Craig Dykers about his firm's continuing success in San Francisco, including an extension to SFMOMA, a consulting role on the (recently revised, and moved) Golden State Warriors Arena and a (ultimately unsuccessful) shortlisting for the Presidio Parklands. snoheta-sf-tower-03
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Eavesdrop> Study shows Angelenos hard up for rent

Forget about San Francisco being the hardest place to rent in California. According to a story in the New York Times (citing zillow.com), Angelenos spend 47 percent of their income on the median rent. That’s the highest in the country, and significantly higher than San Francisco, which ranks sixth on the list at 40.7 percent. And the problem appears ready to get worse as new supply struggles to keep up with demand in the overcrowded city. Maybe we’ll all have to move to Bakersfield.
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Los Angeles and San Francisco make bids to host the 2024 Olympic Games

After hosting the Olympic Games in 1932 and 1984, Los Angeles is in the hunt to be the Unites States' candidate to host them again in 2024. Earlier this week the city made a presentation to the U.S. Olympic Committee, followed by pitches from Boston, San Francisco and Washington, D.C. According to Inside The Games, a website dedicated to Olympic news, LA's proposal would be heavy on existing facilities, cutting down on costs so much that Mayor Eric Garcetti called it the "most affordable" of any U.S. proposal. The games would once again focus on the LA Memorial Coliseum (which would be substantially renovated), and surrounding Exposition Park, both just south of USC. Other significant venues would include Staples Center, the Nokia Theater, Griffith Observatory, the Queen Mary, and even Walt Disney Concert Hall. According to Inside The Games, the bid shows off LA's ongoing transit expansion, with officials claiming that 80 per cent of spectators will be connected to venues by public transport. San Francisco proposed a $4.5 billion, privately financed plan that would also focus on existing, or already-planned facilities. According to the SF Chronicle they would include newly-completed Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, several waterfront piers, and the Golden State Warriors' upcoming arena in Mission Bay. A temporary stadium for the opening and closing ceremonies in Brisbane, south of San Francisco, would be removed after the games, and the Olympic Village would be contained in 2,000 units of housing already approved as the fourth phase of development at the Hunters Point shipyard. “We’re not going to be building white elephants in our city or anyplace in our region,” San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee told the Chronicle. The USOC is expected to decide on an entry city by early next year, and the International Olympic Committee is expected to choose the 2024 host city in 2017. The U.S. has not hosted a Summer Olympics since the 1996 Games in Atlanta. The last U.S. city to host the Winter Olympics was Salt Lake City, in 2002.
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New Buildings Institute catalogues the nation’s net-zero buildings

The Vancouver-based New Buildings Institute (NBI) tracks energy efficient built work, and their 2014 update, “Getting to Zero”, provides a snapshot of the emerging U.S. market for net-zero buildings—those are structures that use no more energy than they can gather on site. In the United States, California leads in the number of low and zero energy projects with 58, followed by Oregon (18), Colorado (17), Washington (16), Virginia (12), Massachusetts (11), Florida (10), Pennsylvania (10), Illinois (8), North Carolina (8), and New York (8). NBI also compiled a database of all their buildings. They say architects and developers interested in pursuing net-zero design could find inspiration there, searching according to their local climate and/or building characteristics. The database includes energy-efficient and high-performance buildings that are not net-zero, as well. Though the trend has succeeded in garnering attention and excitement among many designers, true net-zero buildings remain elusive in the built environment. So far NBI has only certified 37 buildings as net-zero. That ranking is based on performance—each building underwent a review of at least 12 months of measured energy use data. If piece-meal projects aren't yet adding up to a groundswell of net-zero design, NBI is also pushing systemic change—rigorous energy efficiency standards recently adopted in Illinois took cues from the group's Core Performance Guide.
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San Francisco’s Candlestick Park to be replaced by an outlet mall and housing

San Francisco's city center isn't the only place undergoing unprecedented changes. While the 49ers play out their season in the much warmer (and tech-nerd-friendly) new Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, their former home, Candlestick Park, is about to be replaced by an outlet center and residential community. The San Francisco Chronicle reported that Candlestick Point will become home to a $1 billion, 500,000-square-foot “urban outlet” shopping center and housing development. The plans are being developed by homebuilder Lennar, which lost an effort to build a new stadium in the city  a few years back, and by retail developer Macerich. They would include retail, restaurants, a marketplace, movie theaters, a performance venue and hotel, and 6,000 rental and for-sale homes. Much of the property would maintain a city-like profile (street line, mixed heights, styles and materials) and be covered by outdoor pedestrian walkways, plantings, and fountains, but nobody is calling this a groundbreaking break from formula. And to 49ers fans, they will never replace the days of tailgating and Raider bashing. The facility would not only serve the residents at Candlestick, but at the Nearby Hunters Point Shipyard property, where Lennar  is building a large residential development. Candlestick now joins Bay Meadows racetrack in San Mateo as former sports facilities to become new communities. Meanwhile the Oakland County Coliseum (somehow) still remains.
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Pictorial> Illuminate SF setting San Francisco aglow

For the second year, San Francisco Travel (the city's marketing organization) is organizing Illuminate SF, a two-month series of light art installations around the metropolis. This year's version, taking place now through the end of the year, features 16 glowing pieces—11 of them permanent—including works by James Turrell, Ned Kahn,Vito Acconci, and James Carpenter. Many are integrated into San Francisco buildings, such as Morphosis' San Francisco Federal Building, KMD's SF Public Utilities Commission, the grain elevator at Pier 92, and various terminals at SFO. Cities like Cleveland and New York have held similar festivals in recent years. The San Francisco event includes the return of Leo Villareal's Bay Lights, the world's largest LED light sculpture covering the Oakland Bay Bridge's 1.8-mile-long West Span. Soma, by Flaming Lotus Girls, was originally displayed at Burning Man, and will be illuminated every night from sunset until 2:00 a.m. Accompanying events for Illuminate SF include film screenings, art walks, tours, light shows, Christmas Tree lightings, and even parades. Enjoy a slideshow of the phenomenal installations below.  
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Eavesdrop> Lifting The Veil On So Many Secrets

It’s such a shame that we live in areas so full of secrecy. Why won’t Hollywood stars in Los Angeles or tech moguls in San Francisco let architects spread the word about their million dollar houses? Sure we hear dribs and drabs. For instance that Sergei Brin and a major executive at Yahoo! have both commissioned San Francisco architect Olle Lundberg to design their new abodes. But these tidbits are far too infrequent. So we at Eavesdrop are making a plea for you to share gossip on who is designing for the most famous people you can think of. We promise, we won’t divulge our sources. And we won’t partner with Us Weekly. Probably. And speaking of secrets, we hear that there’s a secret service facility a few floors above the new offices of Gensler at City National Plaza. How did we find out? They were protecting Vice President Joe Biden when he came to town… And Renzo Piano seemed to divulge his own secret feelings about his Academy Museum in Los Angeles to the LA Times recently: “I don’t think it will be that bad… Actually, I’m struggling to do something good.” Faint praise for himself, don’t you think?
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San Francisco’s huge 5M Development releases Environmental Impact Report

Forest City has announced that it is moving forward with a plan to build a residential and office complex on four acres around the San Francisco Chronicle building, a 1924 structure located on the corner of 5th and Mission streets in the South of Market (Soma) neighborhood. The developer published the Environmental Impact Report (PDF) for the plan, known as "5M," last Wednesday and presented it at a public hearing of the city's Planning Commission this week. The design team for the project includes architect Kohn Pederson Fox, urban designer SiteLab, and historic resources consultant Architectural Resources Group.  According to the EIR, the project would contain about 1.8 million square feet of development, presented in two different options. In the "Office Scheme," it would include about 870,000 square feet of offices, 800,000 square feet of residential, and 150,000 square feet of active ground floor uses. In the "Residential Scheme," it would include about 600,000 square feet of office uses, 1 million square feet of residential, and 150,000 square feet of ground floor use. In either scheme, the plan would renovate two existing buildings (including the Chronicle Building), build four new buildings, and demolish six existing buildings. On its web site, the developers call for "carved buildings," to add visual interest, "sculpted high rises," a careful balance of uses, and a pedestrian experience enhanced with active storefronts and art walls. According to the Chronicle, in addition to the new facilities, the development would include a 12,000 square foot "Mary Square," and a 22,000 square foot green space on the Chronicle Building Roof. The project, which is facing heavy criticism from local neighborhood groups,  is expected to get underway by 2016 or 2017 and phase in over about ten years. Public comments will be heard until December 1. Forest City said renderings should be available within about a month, so stay tuned.