Posts tagged with "Samsung":

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Meet the honorable mentions in our 2017 Best of Product Awards!

Last week we shared the winning designs from our largest-ever Products Awards across 15 sundry categories, including technology, textiles, HVAC, furniture, facades, and more. Scroll through the slideshow to see the the honorable mentions from each category, evaluated by our team of judges for innovation, aesthetics, performance, and value. You can find our winners and honorable mentions featured in our September issue—out September 6! The Best of Products Awards Jury: James Biber Partner, Biber Architects Olivia Martin Managing Editor, The Architect’s Newspaper William Menking Editor in Chief, The Architect’s Newspaper Patrick Parrish Owner, Patrick Parrish Gallery Tucker Viemeister Founder, Viemeister Industries Pilar Viladas Design writer and editor HONORABLE MENTIONS To view images of all honorable mentions, please click through the slideshow above. Finishes & Surfaces CONDUCT by Flavor Paper PUZZLE by Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby for Mutina for Stone Source Bath LINEA SHOWER BASE by Fiora VERGE WITH WASHBAR by Bradley Corp. Lighting SYMMETRY by Visa Lighting LIFT WITH BIOS by Pinnacle Architectural Lighting Textiles SIGNATURE & LEGACY COLLECTIONS by KnollTextiles SHADE by Chilewich Openings GPX FIREFLOOR SYSTEM by Safti First CURVED by Vitrocsa Technology & Innovation MATTERPORT PRO2 3D CAMERA by Matterport PORTABLE ULTRA SHORT THROW PROJECTOR by Sony Kitchen 4-DOOR FLEX REFRIGERATOR by Samsung VERTICAL BAR BLOCK by Henrybuilt Interior Commercial Furniture GLASSCUBE by CARVART KANSO BENCH by HBF Interior Residential Furniture STEMN SERIES by Fyrn DICHROIC TABLE by Rottet Collection Structural FIRE AND WATER BARRIER TAPE by 3M SCHLUTER-DITRA-HEAT-DUO by Schluter Systems Smart Home Systems EVOLVED MINNEAPOLIS FULL ESCUTCHEON HANDLESET by Baldwin Hardware PANOVISTA MAX by Renson Facades PHOTOVOLTAIC FACADE by Onyx Solar TRIANGULAR RAINSCREEN PANEL by Shildan HVAC EME3625DFL LOUVER by Ruskin AIRFLOW PANEL by Architectural Applications Outdoor Public GO OUTDOORTABLE by Landscape Forms ULURU by Metalco srl/id metalco, Inc. Outdoor Residential CLOUD BENCH by Bend Goods VERTICAL LOUNGER by DEESAWAT  
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The Future is Now: Here’s what caught our eye at this year’s Consumer Electronics Show

This month's Consumer Electronics Show (CES) brought more than 170,000 attendees to visit over 3,600 exhibitors. Navigating a sea of similar tech products may seem overwhelming, but there are a few products to note within the realms of smart home technology, 3D printing, and electronics to improve one’s health. House of the Future Nearly a Reality Still no self-cleaning floors, but a Jetson-like future is not far off with systems like Vivint, which syncs most of the controls in your home to your smartphone. Not only do these systems offer doorbell and ping security cameras that include two-way talk, you can also control the garage door, lighting, temperature, and DVR remotely. The newest addition to the Vivant family is the integration of Kwikset Smart Locks, the Nest Learning Thermostat, and the Amazon Echo. To keep things clean top to bottom, WINBOT is a new robot that cleans framed and frameless windows as well as horizontal glass surfaces and mirrors. All you have to do is spritz the cleaning pad, switch it on, and place it on the window. The bot does the rest by automatically scanning and calculating the size of the window or surface. Samsung debuted the Family Hub Refrigerator that brings a bunch of sci-fi tech to real life. With a 21.5-inch HD LCD display on the exterior, you can post family photos and calendars as well as stream music and watch live TV; so you never have to miss a moment of the big game or award show while refilling on snacks. One of the most impressive features is the set of three interior cameras that take photos every time the door is closed. Next time you are at the grocery store and can’t remember if you are out of milk, just peer inside the fridge from your smartphone screen. Skydrop, the new smart sprinkler controller, monitors local weather data and automatically sets the perfect time and amount of water its yard receives. The system can reduce water usage by 50 percent, which saves money while aiding the environment. Let’s Get Physical  Knowing how many steps walked or calories burned in a day is so yesterday. With iHealth’s collection of medical-tech accessories, users can monitor every aspect of their health including blood pressure, glucose levels; weight and BMI; sleep, and blood oxygen levels. With the MyVitals app all data can be viewed in one place and easily shared. Swarovski has released activity tracking jewelry, called Shine, that transforms from watch to necklace to bracelet all while wirelessly syncing with the wearer’s smart phone. Humanscale has created two products that work in tandem to increase productivity and psychical activity in the workplace. The QuickStand Lite transforms any fixed-height desk into a standing desk, and can be moved easily allowing for users to sit or stand as often as necessary. The OfficeIQ was created in collaboration with Tome Software and uses sensor technology to gather data on sit-stand use. It measures caloric expenditure and sends real time notifications to users, reminding them when they have been seated too long. Print it Out 3DSystems recently released CubePro, a large-format printer that makes printing professional quality models at home a snap. Especially with new printing materials that include nylon, rinse-away support, and wood composite materials. The Nylon material is a flexible and long-lasting medium for functional prototyping. Rinse-Away allows designers to achieve intricate patterns that are easy to remove and leave no“support stubble”” residue. Lastly, its wood composite material can be sanded, nailed, drilled, stained, and painted to make artistic creations. Big news for those of us who are not in the position to buy large-scale printing devices, or have too much work for a home printer to handle. UPS is now offering over 60 printing locations in the U.S. that can quickly and efficiently turn 3D files into models.
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NBBJ’s “generative” courtyard office headquarters for Samsung

The two 10-story towers are clad in white metal and clear glass, carefully balanced to reduce solar heat gain and provide a sense of lightness.

Samsung’s new North American headquarters, designed by NBBJ, is a landmark facility in Silicon Valley embracing new urban guidelines developed by San Jose officials to prioritize active streets and environmental sensitivity. The project creates a sense of lightness with a transparent, environmentally responsible facade, and has been used as a case study project within NBBJ’s international network of offices. The compound is composed of two ten-story towers designed around an interior courtyard and floating open-air gardens. The architects adopted the diagram of a semiconductor as inspiration for the building, defined by an energized void space between separated slabs. Connecting stairs located at every two floors establish a centralized “3-D Main Street” linked by pocket parks. The ground floor extends an open public program into the adjacent city, providing a connection to the tech community. Despite working in a ten-story office tower, Samsung employees are never farther than one story from outdoor space. Utilizing a courtyard typology to maximize daylight and natural ventilation into a flexible open office layout, the project anticipates LEED Gold certification. The facade system for the facility plays a significant role in the project, achieving three key functions: encouraging social interaction, communicating a brand identity, and sensitively responding to the environment by incorporating renewable energy and managing solar conditions.
  • Facade Manufacturer Benson
  • Architects NBBJ
  • Facade Installer Benson
  • Facade Consultants ARUP
  • Location San Jose, CA
  • Date of Completion 2015
  • System white metal, glass exterior unitized panel
  • Products unitized curtain wall products (painted aluminum & glazed curtain wall), TS & metal stud framed with ceramic tile and plaster finishes.
Rather than designing an all-glass facade, NBBJ developed a white metal, glass, and terracotta exterior with an undulating gradient of punched window openings responsive to environmental criteria. For example, the building orientation is aligned to San Jose’s city grid, which is rotated off a north-south axis, causing direct heat gain to be managed across multiple facades. This assisted with solar heat gain concerns and established an aesthetic identity for Samsung’s headquarters. The interior facade is noticeably more transparent, utilizing a floor to ceiling glazing system. Collaborating with ARUP, NBBJ designed the facade to be a shop-built assembly—it was craned into place, ensuring a high-quality, controlled assembly process. The architects teamed with Benson, who fabricated the facade panels. The building is formally very simple, but becomes activated by people, fostering a collaborative environment. This is a “generative” building, designed for flexibility to allow for as many new ideas as possible. A collaborative, interactive spirit drove the project’s design from the start. The outcome is an open, tolerant, flexible building that enables possibilities and drives innovation.
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NBBJ’s just-opened Samsung headquarters seeks urbanism in Silicon Valley

Samsung’s new North American headquarters in San Jose is now open for business. Designed by NBBJ, the 1.1 million-square-foot, $300 million building presents itself as a counterpoint to the introverted campuses that dot Silicon Valley: Facebook’s self-contained, Gehry-ific HQ or Foster’s secluded spaceship for Apple. Unveiled in 2013, the design went from concept to construction in rapid time. According to the architects, the designers and Samsung worked closely with the city to create a scheme that supports the city’s urban design mandate for densification, walkability, and bikeability. (AN recently reported that San Jose also has a mandate to generate jobs, a mission that is at times at cross-purposes with the need for housing in the region.) The building is sited to connect to the city’s light-rail system. The design is meant to encourage employees to leave their desks at lunch and walk across the landscaped gardens to the cafeteria, to engage just a bit in the activities of urban life. And the inverse is also true. A courtyard in the middle of the office block (the building reveals itself to be two bar buildings connected by bridges on alternating floors) is open to the public and will offer retail amenities. Samsung’s 2,000 employees can look out through the interior glass facade at the choreography of everyday life passing through the South Korean company’s own Piazza del Campo. “The world’s largest electronics company is changing itself into innovator. This brought about a need to change the internal culture of the workplace,” explained Scott Wyatt, the NBBJ partner in charge in the firm’s Seattle office who led the workplace strategy. “We asked ourselves ‘How can a building help them compete for talent and enable innovation?’” For Wyatt the answer on view in San Jose suggests that open floor plates, and connection to the outdoors both physically and visually, and interaction between employees promotes health and performance. Moreover, the design responds to a need for architecture flexible enough to accommodate team-based work and, in trendy workplace parlance, mobility. As such, collaborative spaces face the courtyard while the more solo desks and focused work areas are located around the perimeter. The gradated window openings on the exterior facade are calibrated to the need for more or less daylight. “Work any time in any place, but in teams is changing how buildings are made,” he noted.
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NBBJ Designing Samsung’s New Silicon Valley Campus

As Apple and Facebook have proven, corporate complexes are all the rage these days in Silicon Valley. Samsung (Apple's phone nemesis) is the latest tech titan to add to the roster of architectural Bay Area campuses, rivaling Apple’s planned circular headquarters and Facebook’s Gehry-designed West Campus. The company plans to build a 1.1 million square foot sales and R&D headquarters on its current North San Jose site. Designed NBBJ, it will include a 10-story tower, an amenity pavilion, and a parking garage. Based on renderings released to the Silicon Valley Business Journal last month, the tower will contain three distinct volumes wrapping around an open courtyard; the parking structure will be covered in living walls; and the five-pronged pavilion will showcase a perforated roof design. Design documents also reveal that various floors will house open-offices, 300+ work stations, a fitness room, and several terraces.