Posts tagged with "Salone del Mobile":

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Salone del Mobile Highlights

As usual, Milan Design Week was a whirlwind as architects, designers, dealers, journalists, and PR firms descended to the most storied furniture brands pavilions at Salone del Mobile and showrooms across the city. Here are a few highlights from the week:

Salone del Mobile Rho Fiera

The main event, particularly for the trade, spans over two million square meters and is housed in building by Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas. Thousands of pavilions were carefully crafted to attract furniture buyers, dealers, and press for the 55th Salone del Mobile. The larger brands have teams who spend up to a year designing pavilions, which have to be assembled in a week. Some impressive pavilions this year included Cassina’s recreation of the Rietveld Pavillion built in Holland in the 1955. Also impressive was Kartell’s “Talking Minds,” where each designer had his or her own “room” with video interviews playing on loop explaining the inspiration and methodology behind the designs, Arper’s carefully curated color stories, and Dedon’s verdant “Jungalow.” Cosentino’s creative rooms around the world by Canadian studio Ciccone Simone, complete with a full cafe serving up drinks and charcuterie. Salone Satellite was another must-see for the AN team, see our write up on it here. Also, don't miss our trend-spotting article on the Salone's chromatic glass.

Spazio Orlandi

A must-see for all, Rossana Orlandi’s gallery features a wide range of up-and-coming and independent designers from around the globe. This year, Spazio Orlandi was accompanied by Marta Di Bibendum next door where AirBnB and Ambra Medda hosted the extremely popular Makers and Bakers event. The entire café was furnished with the designs for people to use as they ate in the café. Norwegian Gallerie S.e. also hosted a minimal space with luxurious furniture in rich metals and velvet. Incredible designers such as Maarten BaasPiet Hein Eek, Yukiko Nagai, Alcarol, and Nika Zupanc.

Triennale

Set in Milan’s Sempione park, this year’s XXI Triennale theme "21st Century: Design After Design" was interpreted into exhibits such as Stanze (Rooms), Architecture as Art, Neo Preistoria, La Metropoli Multietnica, and more. We particularly enjoyed the Stanze at the Triennale musem, where visitors walked through a series of rooms designed by notable figures—Gio Ponti, Franco Albini, Carlo Mollino, Carlo Scarpa, Carlo De Carli, Vittoriano Viganò, Ettore Sottsass, Joe Colombo, etc—as well as newer architects, such as Andrea Anastasio, Fabio Novembre, Duilio Forte, Elisabetta Terragni, Carlo Ratti, and Francesco Librizzi. The focus was on Milan’s reputation as having architecture with plain exteriors and stunning interiors.

Atelier Clerici

Set in the stunning, hyper-elaborate rococo Clerici palazzo, young designers presented forward-thinking designs and concepts. RAM House by PROKOSS + Space Caviar offered a place to sit in the courtyard.

Inside the space, Aldo Bakker’s amorphous video installation Pause offered a preview of his upcoming retrospective at CID Grand-Hornu. SapienStone’s Smart Slab is an integrated cooktop design with technology that allows almost quarter-inch-thick stone to be heated, cooled, or transformed into a stovetop by touching the interactive surface. Textile brand Buro Belen used natural dyes that slowly change over time, reacting to touch, sun, and wear to show how materials interact with their users.

To learn more about some of the designers we saw at Atelier Clerci, don’t miss our upcoming May Interiors issue!

Valcucine at Brera Design District, Salone del Mobile 2016 from Architect's Newspaper on Vimeo.

Brera Design District

A sprawling neighborhood of showrooms for both furniture and fashion houses, a few Brera highlights included the incredible HAY market, a gymnasium with maze-like rooms packed out with the company’s wares. Hem presented a series of ice cream socials to celebrate Max Lamb’s new “Last Stool Splatter” collection. In addition there were works by Philippe Malouin, Karoline Fesser, and Studio DeFORM. The showrooms by Valcucine, DePadova, Boffi, Miele, Agape, Cappellini, Fantini, and more, opened their doors to display new designs and offer cocktails each night.

The Hotel Wallpaper in the Via San Gregorio arcade displayed collaborations among architects and designers to create a “hotel” with a bar, bedroom, bathroom, lounge area, and even a mini golf course created with thick Bolon fabric (a sponsor of the exhibit).

Via Tortona

Part block party, part exhibition space, Via Tortona hosted the SuperDesign Show and a gamut of events featuring designs by major brands and designers, such as Marcel Wanders, Naoto Fukasawa, and Maarten Baas.

The SuperDesign Show, 10,000 square meters of space, chose the theme White Pages, that according to the press release, “implies writing together the world waiting for us tomorrow…. An invitation to exhibit not only ready-to-use objects and proposals but also futuristic and experimental projects and to ‘narrate’ them to the public with words and installations in an ideal ‘white page.’”

COS X Fujimoto Forest of Light

Clothing and company COS collaborated with Sou Fujimoto for this room filled with fog, cones of light, and custom-made noises.

Spazio Lambrate

Located in a former gym in the north east Section of Milan, Spazio Lambrate features designers such as Roberto Negri, Arredi Siamo Scarti, Agostino Favarelli, and Laura Daza. It is part of a burgeoning creative district in Milan and we predict it will continue to be an important part of future saloni.

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Trend Spotting at Salone del Mobile in Milan: Chromatic Glass

There have been plenty of color and style trends occurring in Milan but the one that really took us by surprise was rainbow spectrum glass.
This collection of mirrors, side tables, and dining tables is a collaboration between Glas Italia and Patricia Urquiola (who herself seemed to be trending at the fair, with products designed for multiple brands).
At SuperDesign Show 3M, the maker of post-its collaborated with Stefano Boeri Architetti on an installation that uses films, nonwovens, and adhesives to create a kaleidoscopic tree that reflects light in colorful patterns and allows guests to recharge.
Eli5e designer Elise Luttik debuted a pair of chairs (at Salone Satellite) that really stood out—one stationary and another that swivels. The pair reflects geometric shapes on the wall and would liven up any office or home.
AGC Glass, a Japanese company that's a leading manufacturer of glass, chemicals, and high-tech materials, crafted an art installation at SuperDesign Show entitled Amorphous. It was inspired by amorphous molecular structures that don't have a definite shape. The installationis made with 5,000 pieces of thin, chemically-strengthened glass that fracture the light and creates a stunning display.
Also showing in the Satellite was Ini Archibong, who had been commissioned by design label Amen&Amen to create a collection inspired by literature and fantasy called The Secret Garden.
 The COG installation at Spazio Orlandi was designed by Moritz Waldemeyer for watch brand Panerai.
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The next big thing: Emerging designers at Salone Satellite

Perhaps one of the most interesting pavilions at Milan’s Salone del Mobile, Salone Satellite features top new and emerging designers from around the world. Whether it is a “magic” bookshelf, sustainably sourced alpaca furniture, or a light that syncs with your heartbeat, Satellite designers never fail to surprise and delight. Fondue Light by Satsuki Ohata Inspired by cheese (Ohata is a big fan of the stuff), the Fondue light contains a bulb that can be raised and lowered to create different levels of diffused or targeted light. As If From Nowhere by Orla Reynolds Irish designer Orla Reynolds created this modular bookcase for small spaces. A brightly colored table and four chairs tuck neatly among the shelves and can be pulled out as needed. Kinetic BioLab by Scottie Chih-Chieh Huangkinetic from Architect's Newspaper on Vimeo. Kinetic BioLab by Scottie Chih-Chieh Huang Part of the Taiwanese designer’s responsive, biologically-inspired work, this light syncs with your heartbeat when you touch it. Allpaka by Sophia Clark, Galiatea When Clark was traveling through Peru, she learned that although alpaca fur is one of the most luxurious materials in the world, the fibers are so short that cloth made with alpaca is often mixed with other materials—diminishing its quality. In her Allpaka line, the fur runs free with the softest, fluffiest furniture and pillows around. The alpaca hides used for the collection are sourced sustainably from animals that died of natural causes. Sander Lorier, Studio Lorier Lorier’s line of minimal, whimsical products seek to simplify and elevate everyday life. The designs are locally produced in the Netherlands from porcelain, copper, and wood. Fungi Collection by Alcarol At first glance Alcarol’s work may look like a standard glass and wood construction, but up close the resin and petrified wood is anything but. The wood is left raw, creating textural interest across the furniture’s surfaces. Taac by Henry & Co. Using 100 percent recycled, sustainable materials Henry & Co’s Taac module, half bathroom half kitchen is made from hemp, coconut, quartz, electric cables, bamboo, clay, limestone, and a radiating plate.
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Product> Kitchens + Baths: The Latest Designs from Europe

At Salon del Mobile, the specialized trade show Eurocucina focuses on innovation in kitchen systems and appliances. This year, trends include a fascination with dark woods and the evolution of wall cabinets from closed boxes to open shelves. On the bathroom front, exhibitors at the Salone del Bagno were promoting unusual finishes and materials for plumbing fixtures and fittings. Valcucine Riciclantica Acciaio Now available with a glass worktop, ultra-thin doors, and a redesigned backsplash panel that facilitates installation around utility lines. Designed by Gabriele Centazzo. Snaidero Ola 25 In Ferrari Red lacquer, this limited-edition design commemorates the quarter-century anniversary of the kitchen manufacturer. Designed by Pininfarina. Scavolini Foodshelf Designed specifically for open-plan residences, the storage is modeled after living room furniture, rather than traditional kitchen cabinets. Designed by Ora-ïto. Leicht Xtend+ Automated louvered cabinet fronts can be raised and lowered via remote control or smartphone. Elmar @home The black walnut cooking island is modeled after a Venetian rowlock. Suspended steel cylinders house ventilation, lighting, and audio speakers. Designed by C+S Architects. Cesar Kalea Aluminum door-frames can be fitted with glass, wood, or ceramic panels in a variety of colors and finishes. Designed by G.V. Plazzogna. Kreoo Gong Available in four marbles, this 32-inch-by-13-inch basin can be installed as a countertop vessel or on a compatible pedestal. Designed by Enzo Berti. Dornbracht MEM in Cyprum Finish This new rose-gold-colored finish is a nuanced interpretation of polished copper; available on select fitting collections for bath and kitchen. MEM was designed by Sieger Design. Rexa Esperanto This component-based system provides flexible design alternatives that can be adapted to baths of different sizes and configurations. Designed by Monica Graffeo. Geberit Monolith A compromise between bulky floor-mounted commodes and in-wall installations, this toilet features a shallow tank that is sheathed in white or black glass. Axor Axor Starck V Fabricated of glass, this bathroom mixer puts hydrodynamics on display, with a swirling vortex created whenever the tap is turned on. Designed by Philippe Starck. Laufen IlBagnoAlessi One  Offered in 35-inch and 47-inch versions, the curves of this console basin complement the strong lines of the walnut vanity cabinet. Designed by Stefano Giovannoni.
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Zaha Hadid's Boldly Curvaceous Forms and Surfaces from Milan

While much of the work introduced at Milan this year played it safe—distinctly conservative colors, forms familiar from the 1950s, cautious use of materials—some architects' designs took, shall we say, a bolder stance. But: Was it a better one? You, ever-opinionated reader, shall and no doubt will be the judge of that. Among the boldest of the bold designs this year were four pieces presented by Zaha Hadid. Most photos we've seen of the aluminum Manta Ray seating underscore its unfortunate semblance, not to the graceful sea creature, but to a giant human posterior. At AN, we're taking the high road, featuring this more abstracted view of the piece. But it may not be enough to erase the obvious imagery. Here, Hadid has designed a fireplace, which appears to have melted into a puddle of black marble. Ironically cold design, for an interiors element that generates heat. Thumbs up on this one. A rectangular top is a disciplined extension of the vaguely tripod-ish base. Great stone fabrication, and we wouldn't even mind bumping our knees on the legs of this terrific table. A welcome departure from the blobby, yes? But the mid-point of the unit seems to be a bit dysfunctional for shelving, lacking any level horizontal surfaces, but hey, it's all about the cantilever. Looking back on Salone 2014, it's interesting that one can fairly easily discern which pieces were architect-generated versus those that were created by industrial designers. The latter are trained (and paid) to produce commercially viable furniture collections, while the former are free to indulge in the making of domestic monuments.
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Video> Bouroullec Brothers’ Quiet Motion Takes A Spin in Milan

At Salone del Mobile in April, French designers Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec demonstrated what it’s like to take a spin in a BMWi. Quiet Motion, the Bouroullec brothers’ interactive interpretation of the sustainable electric car brand, was an installation open for visitors to climb onto revolving platforms to relax as the world leisurely passed around them. Situated within a picturesque cloister of a Milanese monastery, four spinning cork platforms rotated slowly and quietly as, according to the brothers, “an allegorical interpretation of movement and contemplation.” The designers construed the concept of sustainable mobility with materials such as fabrics made of the sustainable wool yarn used as seat upholstery in the electric car and lightweight carbon columns produced using renewable energy resources. To reference materials used in car design, blue fabric strips surrounded each of the four carousels and leather covered the platforms. Bouroullec brothers-designed Aim lamps hung from the ceilings and illuminated the area at night. Materials commonly associated with furniture and interiors such as cork and fabrics were also utilized.