Posts tagged with "Salone del Mobile":

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Milan shows examine design in the face of disaster

The much anticipated Museo del Design Italiano opened its doors to the public in the same week in April as the Salone del Mobile.Milano. Housed in the storied Milan Triennale, this carefully assembled selection of design artifacts is curated by Joseph Grima, who began his tenure as the museum’s first director. This collection, housed in the Italian Design Museum, is a preeminent example, according to the Triennale Foundation’s president Stefano Boeri, of Italy’s rich post-war cultural heritage. Grima’s formula for the permanent exhibition is to parcel the Triennale’s significant archive into limited sets or editions, that he characterizes as “episodes,” with the first episode serving as the premiere event. Episode 1 is a survey of the postwar years between 1948 and 1981 and is housed in the first half of the curved gallery that winds around the ground floor. Each progressive installment will expand deeper into the Triennale’s bowel-like interiors. The ultimate goal for the Design Museum is to expand beyond Giovanni Muzio’s original 1930s architectural masterpiece. The intention, according to Boeri, is for the museum to grow out by dipping below the rear gardens. An international competition for this future wing will soon be in the offing. It should be pointed out, however, that the exhibition on Italian design is concurrent with, if only through a programming coincidence, a major traveling exhibition located on the second floor above: Broken Nature, curated by Paola Antonelli, the highly successful senior curator of architecture and design at MoMA. Subtitled Design Takes on Human Survival (open through September 1, 2019), this detailed survey of critical strategies dealing directly with the plight of the planet and its increasingly fragile ecosystems aims to be the last word on what is possible through human action in the fuzzy realm of the “technosphere,” a term coined by Peter Haff and adopted by Antonelli’s curatorial team. An impressive number of prominent international designers, thinkers, visual artists and craftspeople share the extensive second-floor space in a sprawling display of human invention and earthly ingenuity. The two inadvertently overlapping exhibitions bring up the question of mutual relevancy, precisely because the similarities between these two exhibitions are much more marked than one would first assume. Looking at the two epochs under consideration, one postwar, the other very recent, both shows are reactions to extreme geopolitical contexts. Italy in the immediate postwar period had to overcome severe wartime devastation; while today, we are evidently firsthand witnesses to a ballooning climatic disaster. Why push the comparison? Because Joseph Grima’s vision of the late fifties to the early eighties serendipitously provides us with a collection of object-time-capsules, or packaged narratives, where we come face to face with an Olivetti typewriter, a pair of Moonboots, a miniature Brionvega television set. These items are neatly arranged alongside related prototype wooden models, publications from promotional advertising campaigns, and in some cases original cardboard packaging. True, as Stefano Mirti, the Milanese designer and critic who was one of the earliest to comment on the exhibit over social media, put it, the objects are readied as if for Instagram shots, but Mirti also took great delight in the immediacy and directness with which these objects are allowed to communicate with us. The famed folding clamshell Grillo telephones, designed in 1965 by Marco Zanuso and Richard Sapper, are featured. Pick up the phone, try to remember or guess how to use the dial, and you are connected to the designer’s voice responsible for creating the object in front of you. It’s a pretty direct message, with no middleman. Why is everyone still so mesmerized with this by-now relatively familiar collection of top Italian design objects? The something else that characterizes this permanent collection is the inherent irony, cynicism, and deep criticality that underlies almost each and every one of these impressive designs. What could possibly be the reason we are ensnared by Archizoom’s relatively uncomfortable looking Poltrona Mies chair built by Poltronova in 1969 to take just one example? Most of these pieces, developed with sparse financial support from the manufacturers, represent lengthy developments by trial and error, long personal commitments, and rare commercial successes—at least when they first came on the market. A case in point are the colorful names of these creations, Papillon, Rossocactus, Shanghai, CuccioloTrigger of the SpaceVertebraAtollo, etc. The pieces are much more than merely functional objects; they act as totems for a new society. Behind these designs are a nest of ideological structures that reject standardization, often embrace handcrafts and experimental materials, and evidently abandon the strict tenets of modernist rationalism. The pieces are in turn self-ironic, cynically auto destructive, or perversely inefficient. Enzo Mari is the master of this kind of design game, as so many of his pieces in this collection exemplify, like his Box from 1971 for Anonima Castelli, a chair that is its own carrying case, or his Modelli in scala Serie Proposta per autoprogettazione (Scale models for self-design Proposta series), 1973, for Simon International, conceived to empower the user to rethink one’s own domestic environment. The transition from postwar reconstruction to the threat of nuclear annihilation remains all the while a running subtext among these objects. Looking at Broken Nature, one could only hope that there would be an equivalent level of meta-awareness. To be honest, several of the featured designers and creative thinkers in this exhibit do reach these heights, but they are drowned out by the sheer volume of participants. There are the overarching (or overreaching) categories, including “A Changed Climate,” “Complex Environments,” “Made and Unmade,” “More of the Times,” and “Bridges,” and some truly great projects for sure: beginning with the exhibition’s graphic icons, designed by Anna Kulachek. There are many impressive designs, fluent in the parametric, the biomimetic, the diagram, the transgenderative, the playful, but at the end of the day, what can you take away from all these projects, besides a deeply unrequited experience? This is not to slight the many amazing designs featured in Broken Nature, but it calls to question the primary curatorial position, which attempts to be so all-inclusive that there remains little room for personal absorption or reflection on the part of the viewer. There is no way to digest all this comprehensive information into a personal action, or to urge us on as individuals to become more aware or rebellious. The lack of self-reflection, self-criticism, or even some kind of cynical self-abdication leaves the viewer with simply too much useful information to process. Broken Nature is not the only one among these hugely impressive, uber-intelligent, mega-exhibits to come on the circuit in these recent years. But I fear the effects are ultimately counterproductive. In a way, we become frustrated in our attempts to make sense of these works. Go downstairs, to the Museo del Design Italiano, to experience how irony, satire, and self-deprecation draw your curiosity and fuel your imagination. This is what we need more of today.
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Shigeru Ban brings a modular office to Milan for Louis Vuitton

This year’s Salone del Mobile in Milan saw its fair share of high-tech, hardware-embedded furniture, as well as a glorification of lo-fi representation. Pritzker winner Shigeru Ban utilized both approaches for his collaboration with Louis Vuitton, dropping Paper Temporary Studio in the courtyard of Palazzo Serbelloni during the Objets Nomades exhibition. From April 9 to 14, Ban’s modular mobile office was repurposed as a showcase of nomadic architecture. The bunker-like structure, assembled from recycled cardboard tubes and oriented strand board, was originally designed to act as a satellite office during the construction of the Centre Pompidou Metz in Metz, France, and was originally installed on the top of the original Centre Pompidou in Paris in 2004.
 
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Although Paper Temporary Studio is now 15 years old, it exemplifies Ban’s approach to using low-cost, recycled materials in building easily-assembled structures, especially refugee and disaster housing. This isn’t the first time that Ban and Louis Vuitton have worked together; the fashion house invited Ban to build a dome inspired by its Papillon bag on the roof of La Maison Champs Élysées in Paris. The resulting cupola was erected from paper tubes covered in the iconic Louis Vuitton patterned textile and a white PVC canopy.
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Google creates neuroaesthetic experience for Salone del Mobile

This past week in Milan during Salone del Mobile while designers were showing off their latest furnishings, Google was putting on its own exhibition. Following up on last year’s Softwear exhibition, in which the company teamed up with Li Edelkoort to envision a more comfortable, integrated hardware future, this year the tech giant built out three rooms in the Spazio Maiocchi for a show called A Space for Being. A Space for Being explored the ways qualitative senses could be understood with quantitative metrics. Google collaborated with Susan Magsamen of the International Arts + Mind Lab at Johns Hopkins University's Brain Science Institute to develop a design installation that explored the possibilities of neuroaesthetics, or the brain’s and body's responses to the aesthetic world. Visitors lined up around the block to be adorned with a wristband that collected biometric data while they explored the rooms' various furnishings, colors, lights, music, scents, and textiles by Google’s Ivy Ross, Muuto’s Christian Grosen, and Reddymade’s Suchi Reddy. At the end of their walkthroughs, attendees were given synopses of their bodies’ responses to the various spaces, helping them see in which context they were most at ease. While this kind of data-driven neuroaesthetic approach is still in its nascent stages, one could imagine a future when data-driven design becomes more normal, especially in settings like healthcare. Even for those who might balk at the idea of collecting this kind of information to create something so subjective as an interior, the results show that design has a profound impact on us, our biology, and our wellbeing. For more on the latest in AEC technology and for information about the upcoming TECH+ conference, visit techplusexpo.com/nyc/.
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Four standout installations from Milan Design Week 2019

A series of unusual and experimental architectural installations at Milan Design Week 2019 and Salone del Mobile allows visitors the chance to get inside the minds of radical architects, designers, and artists from around the world. These pieces, made in collaboration with prominent Italian brands and historic venues, showcase not only great work by emerging design professionals and veteran acts, but also give attention to pressing themes facing humanity today, such as climate change and life in the ever-evolving digital age. Some of the projects simply bring beauty to the forefront, reminding visitors to look for inspiration in eclectic design. Check out some of AN's favorite installations from the massive design event on AN Interior  
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The best of AN's videos from Milan Design Week 2018

As the saying goes, a picture is worth a thousand words. Well, a video, or, if you will, a moving image, is at least double that. And so The Architect's Newspaper (AN) brings you video highlights from Milan Design Week filmed by our editors onsite at Salone del Mobile, the EuroCucina circuit, and other satellite shows. From interviews with designers to panning views of in situ installations to product install shots, we hope this roundup gives a taste of what it’s like to see and experience it all in person. Laufen’s booth installation Onsite at the fairgrounds of Salone del Mobile, our editors enjoyed this bidet toilet fountain installation by the Swiss-bathroom brand Laufen. Floating mobiles at Rossana Orlandi Watch Martens and Visser’s kinetic sculptures spin and float like bubbles at Rossana Orlandi. AN talks to Studio OEO about their new accessories collection for Mutina Thomas Lykke and Anne-Marie Buemann of Danish architectural firm OEO Studio speak about their collaboration with Mutina, a new collection of home accessories that integrate as a system with Italian manufacturer’s ceramic tiles. Hay at Palazzo Clerichi Hay introduced several new products by the Bouroullec brothers, Stefan Diez, GamFratesi, Shane Schneider, and many repeat offenders. The exhibition showcases designs for everyday living as well as everyday working in the ornate ambiance of Palazzo Clerichi. Bellissimo! AN talks to Hella Jongerius about her tapestry collage for Vitra The Dutch industrial designer talks about the new sofa she developed for Vitra. The installation highlights the textiles she created for “textile nerds.” Apparatus’ ACT III The New York-based design studio debuted their new collection, ACT III, in their Milan showroom. The launch featured a series of alabaster and fluted brass lighting that references Berber jewelry. AN talks to Brussels-based designer Alain Gilles about his acoustic lighting designs Alain Gilles discusses his new acoustic lighting collection for BuzziSpace in the Brera district for Milan Design week. Gufram’s club-inspired furniture collection Disco Gufram is an electronic soundscape outfitted with furniture inspired by original 1970s designs by the studio. Loosely interpreted based on the found archival images, the series features sofas, coffee tables, and cabinets complete with Dali-esque melting disco balls based on their predecessors at disco clubs in the 70s. AN talks to Berlin-based Studio 7.5 about their new seating series for Herman Miller Burkhard Schmitz and Roland Zwick of Studio 7.5 talk about their new seating collection “For You Everyone” at the Herman Miller Showroom in Milan. The exhibition showcased the Cosm series, inviting visitors to sit back and recline. Nendo’s exhibition: Forms of Movement Nendo’s self-exploratory exhibition, Forms of Movement, surveys materials and technologies in 10 conceptual iterations of an object’s function, material, or production process. Here we see a series of furnishings articulated by different shapes and formations of plasticized fabric. AN talks to Space Copenhagen about their collection for Stellar Works Danish design duo Signe  Bindslev Henriksen and Peter  Bundgaard Rützou of Space Copenhagen detail the inspiration behind the new series and how similarities in Asian and Scandinavian cultures transpire in their designs. A 1929 tram by Christina Celestino renovated as a traveling saloon AN rode the Corallo tram with designer Christina Celestino to hear about her inspiration behind the exhibition on wheels. Traveling to-and-fro between three stops in the Brera design district, the interior is reminiscent of 1920s art moderne interiors, specifically the cinema and screening rooms. AN talks to Icelandic designer Hlynur V. Atlason about his commercial series for Ercol Icelandic designer Hlynur V. Atlason details his collection of modular furnishings for Ercol, their first venture in commercial design. He explains this new take and his inspiration point that departed from the English brand’s seminal reference, the traditional Windsor chair. The Diner by Rockwell Group The design world crowds into the American-style diner installation inside a railway arch designed by The New York-based firm. Rockwell Group teamed up with Surface magazine, design consultancy 2x4, and Design Within Reach on the American-inspired establishment located beneath the tracks that lead to Milan's Centrale railway station. See more videos and photos on our Instagram @archpaper
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What we saw at Salone del Mobile 2018

Last week, AN visited the Italian design capital to see the newest releases by brands and designers. We highlight a few more of our favorites finds from Salone del Mobile and its EuroCucina exhibition, as well as a few satellite shows, below.  Filigrana Light Established & Sons Sebastian Wrong’s Filigrana Light for Established & Sons recalls glass making traditions from the 16th century. The orb is made by highly skilled artisans who spiral filigree stripes, continuously rotating the glass to and blowing it to make the final shape. Von Ercol Icelandic designer Hlynur V. Atlason designed Ercol’s first commercial collection of modular furnishings. The series presents a whimsy, colorful new take on the British brand’s hardwood furniture aesthetic based on the Windsor chair. Comprising a chair, an armchair, a work chair outfitted with a student-like arm-desk, a bench/coffee table hybrid, and a magazine table, each piece can be combined for various working environments. SHAPE Poliform Debuting at EuroCucina, this new kitchen model was shown in four configurations to showcase the five new finishes in oak,  glass, extra dark marble, metallic brushed lacquer, and Dekton Calacatta. The series includes a modular stainless steel and glass island system, two snack tables, stools designed by Jean-Marie Massaud, customizable backsplash/wall unit storage, extra-tall to-the-ceiling cabinetry, an extractible steel shelf/work surface, and a range of sliding worktop accessories. Kengo Kuma Alpi Japanese architect Kengo Kuma worked with the Italian wood surfaces outfitter to create a collection that accentuates the woodgrains of maritime pine and Japanese cedar. The grain itself becomes a stylized trope of aesthetic articulations of the material. The Japanese cedar is adorned with smooth, vertical texturing; meanwhile, the pine is characterized by the bark-like shapes split between deep cracks. Vision Snaidero Soft curves form human-centered, ergonomic base units for islands and peninsulas in this kitchen. The LED-lit structural framework outlines fluid surfaces integrated throughout, highlighting the integrated spaces that blur the boundaries between cooking, storage, and entertaining. Sculptural Glass Vases By Paul Surridge for Roberto Cavalli Home Inspired by the fashion house’s infamous animal patterns, the swirling configuration laced around the vessels emulates leopard, zebra, giraffe, and snake motifs abstracted as tactile, textured cladding. The series of ten sculptural glass vases were handmade by Tuscan glass masters and then produced by Arnolfo di Cambio, the glass manufactured established in Colle Val d’Elsa in 1945. Don't miss last week's Milan Design Week highlights! Click here
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Spotlight on ten designs from Salone del Mobile 2018

From April 17 to 22, all eyes in the design world are on the spectacular exhibitions, installations, pop-ups, and launches by an impressive lineup of designers and brands at Milan Design Week. From the International Bathroom and EuroCucina exhibitions to the satellite shows, here is a sampling of the designs—bravissimi!

Talisman Sconce Apparatus

Articulated by a raised pattern, this jewel-like sconce was inspired by Persian motifs that appear in Achaemenid stone reliefs, metalworking, and sculpture. It is part of a series that was inspired by Creative Director Gabriel Hendifar’s Iranian family heirlooms.

Circe Lounge Chair Ini Archibong for Sé

Swiss designer Ini Archibong collaborated with the London-based furniture maker famous for its 20th century-inspired designs. The work is a nod to Art Moderne, featuring the curving geometric lines of the back and base of the chair, and the round, curvaceous form of the soft, pink cushion.

STRUCTURES Kinnasand

Berlin-based Studio Greiling morphed a series of ottomans, benches, and daybeds into a rug-seating hybrid, exploiting the very often unexplored space in between floor and furniture. By draping rugs on top of colorful metal tubing, the fabric transforms into seating.

DeKauri Bath Credenza Daniel Germani for Cosentino

Spanish surfaces purveyor Cosentino and Italian furniture maker Riva 1920 worked with architect Daniel Germani to create a freestanding bathroom vanity that conceals the sink, lighting, storage, and mirror. Doors crafted out of 50,000-year-old Kauri wood open to a white Dekton by Cosentino sink, a Fantini faucet, and vanity-like lighting by Juniper Design.

Series Y Gensler for Artemide

Gensler designed a Mondrian-inspired fixture that accommodates both soft and bright lighting via two different screen profiles. The branchlike composition allows for configuration of direct or indirect illumination—all from a single power source.

Ratio Dada

Belgian-born architect and designer Vincent Van Duysen took a mix of warm and cold materials—wooden panels juxtaposed with natural stone countertops—and rendered them in modular, metallic grids for this kitchen.

Hawa Beirut Richard Yasmine

This otherworldly furniture collection is a nostalgic reflection of architecture in the designer’s hometown of Beirut, including arch-shaped references to Lebanese architectural elements, window-like glass inserts, slabs of marble, and handmade tassels. Swathed in pastel hues, the series comprises a set of chairs, a hybrid table/decorative screen, and a folding screen.

Drop Lindsey Adelman

With its metal, tubular structural system adorned with poetically placed globes, Drop recalls visual tropes associated with the 20th-century machine age. Administering a hand-applied mixture of salt and ammonia to the surface created the algae-like patina.

Kartell by Laufen Laufen Laufen, the Swiss bathroom outfitter, collaborated with Italian furniture purveyor Kartell on a conceptual collection of colorful washbasins, taps and fittings, storage units, shower bases, bathtubs, lights, and accessories. The result is a study of form and silhouette with brightly saturated accents of translucent acrylic, a material for which Kartell is famous.

Disco Gufram

Recalling the surreal disco balls by Dutch art studio Rotganzen, Gufram’s Charley Vezza envisioned three cabinets and two coffee tables as pedestals for melting mirrored disco balls for the Disco collection. Other items aim to preserve the brand’s iconic history of designing Italian dance clubs. Can you dig it?

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The newest addition to Milan Design Week: Ventura Centrale

Amid the general chaos and event overload of Milan Design Week, Ventura Centrale's inaugural show was instantly welcomed to the fray a "must see." Although the organizers describe it as Ventura Lambrate’s “big sister," the show is smaller in addition to being newer. And this works to its benefit: In contrast to the sprawling Tortona, Brera, and—with its new mega IKEA pavilion—Lambrate neighborhoods, Ventura Centrale is compact and makes a targeted impact. The show featured Matteo Zorzenoni with MM Lampadari, Nason Moretti and Scapin, Swiss design studio Panter & Tourron, Lee Broom, Maarten Baas with Lensvelt, Salviati with Luca Nichetto and Ben Gorham, and Baars & Bloemhoff. Each "hall" is located in warehouses below Milan's Central Station that have been closed for 30 years. Each display was distinct and memorable, with crowds increasing as the week went on. Lee Broom's rotating musical carousel, the "Time Machine," drew the longest lines, but each show was cleverly presented and perfectly finished, with very little of the amateurish qualities so often found in inaugural exhibitions. "Set" featured a series of room vignettes with furniture and blown glass pieces by Italian designer Matteo Zorzenoni with the rounded forms and pastel hues dominating interior design as of late, but rendered beautifully and given a new context in its gritty warehouse location. "May I Have Your Attention Please?" by Dutch designer Maarten Baas debuted his eponymous 101 chairs for Lensvelt, surrounded by an installation of bull horns emitting indistinguishable voices to dramatic effect. For Salviati Glass, designer Luca Nichetto and perfumer Ben Gotham created 53 "totem poles" out of some 23,000 sheets of glass, filling the massive terminal and reexamining the potential for classic glasswork. Baas and Blomhoff also took their materials to new heights by commissioning six up-and-coming designers to create something new with it. Daphna Laurens, a veteran of last year's Salone Satellite program, crafted a whimsical and serviceable chair, table, and light set; Sabine Marcelis formed modern, circular lights; Klaas Kuiken created an "inside out" cupboard and dresser; Paul Heijnen designed a gridded wall sconce; and rENS made a series of black stools and seats. While one hopes that Ventura Centrale is popular, we can't help but wish it will stay true to its inaugural year—a smart, fun installation that doesn't require hours of wandering or mapping to navigate.
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Japanese designer Hiroto Yoshizoe wins Lexus Design Award 2017 Grand Prix

After one year, 1,152 entries from 63 countries, 12 finalists, and four prototype presentations, Japan's Hiroto Yoshizoe has been named the winner of the Lexus Design Award 2017 Grand Prix during Milan's Salone del Mobile. The designer, who was a finalist in last year's competition with his water-activated color-changing planters, impressed the judges with PIXEL: an interactive device that utilizes a series of visors to create a range of light and shadow effects, inspired by a childhood memory of falling asleep to the glow of a television. The international design competition was first launched in 2013 to support up-and-coming creatives using design to build a better future. For its fifth edition, the innovation competition focused on the theme “Yet,” which Yoshizoe interpreted as the interplay between light and shadow—much like the way a sunset can be reflected on a cloud as a gradation of color. Yoshizoe is based in Tokyo and is a graduate from Musashino Art University. He explained PIXEL further in a press release: “This work does the same by acting as a filter screen to show the viewer the existence and fascination of light and shadow,” he said. In the final phase of the competition, Yoshizoe was partnered with Snarkitecture’s Daniel Arsham and Alex Mustonen, who mentored him during the prototype process. (The contest’s other industry mentors were Neri & Hu, Max Lamb and Elena Manferdini.) “What I personally was interested in were designs or concepts or projects that are more experiential, more about a sort of overall impression,” Mustonen said of the choice to partner with Yoshizoe. “The advice given from my mentors was very precise and accurate,” added Yoshizoe. "Their suggestion to test a form that I had not considered in the beginning allowed me to develop this work. They also gave me suggestions on new materials, which led me to a path that I did not expect. I am grateful for their advice.” Along with the industry mentors, the contest was judged by a panel of leading names including Paola Antonelli, Aric Chen, Toyo Ito and Alice Rawsthorn. As the Grand Prix winner, Yoshizoe’s design PIXEL will be on display at the LEXUS YET pavilion at the Triennial di Milano.
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BIG unveils “Alphabet of Light” installation with Artemide at Salone del Mobile

In tandem with this year’s Salone del Mobile Euroluce event, Artemide partnered with Bjarke Ingels Group to create a new light series, Alphabet of Light. Inspired by neon lights, BIG worked with Artemide to create an updated, LED light that could be formed into letters or graphics—creating a new font in the process. Alphabet of Light is composed of straight and curved light modules with high-tech optoelectronics to ensure a smooth, even light.

To showcase this new product, BIG and Artemide installed the modular system in the east courtyard of the Università degli Studi di Milano using the classic typography sentence, “Quick Brown Fox Jumps Over the Lazy Dog,” which uses every letter in the alphabet. The installation is part of the event Interni Material Immaterial.

For more Salone del Mobile and Milan Design Week coverage don’t miss The Architect’s Newspaper’s Instagram with our live updates.

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Product>Milan Highlights

We collected our absolute favorite furniture and accessories from in and around Salone del Mobile. Innovation and form combine to create pieces that we want right this instant. Paraventi Berluti x Ceccotti Collezion Ren Valet Stand Poltrona Frau

Designed by Neri & Hu, the collection takes its name from the shape of the Chinese ideogram ren, meaning “person” or “human being.” The pieces are comprised of similar elements, including Canaletto walnut, brass, and Cuoio Saddle leather, best displayed in this handsome valet stand.

Valet Collection by David Rockwell Stellar Works

David Rockwell’s collection is meant to symbolize a new sector of furniture that supports everyday living, working, and entertaining. The valet itself creates an area of reprieve to transition from the busy outside world into a relaxed home. The leather bag holds two pairs of shoes, and there is a walnut shelf for personal items in addition to brass hardware.

Leather Longue chair LL04 DePadova

A reimagined classic lounge chair that combines quality Italian leather with the Scandinavian functionality of designer and architect Maarten Van Severen. The stainless-steel structure is covered in either black or natural cowhide and finished with hand stitching.

Åhus Blå Station

Multicultural design collective OutofStock worked tirelessly with Blå Station’s owners-designers to create their second collaboration. The Åhus easy chair pays homage to the brand’s 30th anniversary by embodying the company’s values: Finding balance between modern and timeless.

Optical collection Lee Broom

A simple, yet graphic lighting collection by Lee Broom is inspired by Op-Art and was displayed all over Milan in a transportable installation entitled “Salone del Automobile.” Although on the outside it looked like an unsuspecting gray delivery van, inside it was an ornately decorated rendition of an Italian palazzo.

Gemma Sofa Moroso

Daniel Libeskind expands his Gemma collection for Moroso with the Gemma sofa, which is an exercise in small-scale architecture. The incredibly plush upholstery contrasts with sharp asymmetrical lines, and the design is inspired by both a precious gemstone and by 15th century Italian tapestries.

Serif TV Samsung

At Superstudio Più in Via Tortona, Samsung and the Bouroullec brothers joined forces to create a new genre of television, designed with an artisanal spirit that considers technology and technical characteristics as well as the consumers’ lifestyle aesthetics and emotions. The result is a monochromatic frame and furniture element unlike any other on the market.

Terra System Mosa

Stone is one of earth’s oldest building materials. Architects designing tomorrow’s landmarks seek its timeless look, but the most desired limestones and sandstones can be porous and problematic over time. Mosa’s expertise in stone-look porcelain is unparalleled, because their technology draws from nature and each tile is unique. Discover the top 5 places where porcelain tile makes a better choice than natural stone.