Posts tagged with "Salone del Mobile":

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The best of AN’s videos from Milan Design Week 2018

As the saying goes, a picture is worth a thousand words. Well, a video, or, if you will, a moving image, is at least double that. And so The Architect's Newspaper (AN) brings you video highlights from Milan Design Week filmed by our editors onsite at Salone del Mobile, the EuroCucina circuit, and other satellite shows. From interviews with designers to panning views of in situ installations to product install shots, we hope this roundup gives a taste of what it’s like to see and experience it all in person. Laufen’s booth installation Onsite at the fairgrounds of Salone del Mobile, our editors enjoyed this bidet toilet fountain installation by the Swiss-bathroom brand Laufen. Floating mobiles at Rossana Orlandi Watch Martens and Visser’s kinetic sculptures spin and float like bubbles at Rossana Orlandi. AN talks to Studio OEO about their new accessories collection for Mutina Thomas Lykke and Anne-Marie Buemann of Danish architectural firm OEO Studio speak about their collaboration with Mutina, a new collection of home accessories that integrate as a system with Italian manufacturer’s ceramic tiles. Hay at Palazzo Clerichi Hay introduced several new products by the Bouroullec brothers, Stefan Diez, GamFratesi, Shane Schneider, and many repeat offenders. The exhibition showcases designs for everyday living as well as everyday working in the ornate ambiance of Palazzo Clerichi. Bellissimo! AN talks to Hella Jongerius about her tapestry collage for Vitra The Dutch industrial designer talks about the new sofa she developed for Vitra. The installation highlights the textiles she created for “textile nerds.” Apparatus’ ACT III The New York-based design studio debuted their new collection, ACT III, in their Milan showroom. The launch featured a series of alabaster and fluted brass lighting that references Berber jewelry. AN talks to Brussels-based designer Alain Gilles about his acoustic lighting designs Alain Gilles discusses his new acoustic lighting collection for BuzziSpace in the Brera district for Milan Design week. Gufram’s club-inspired furniture collection Disco Gufram is an electronic soundscape outfitted with furniture inspired by original 1970s designs by the studio. Loosely interpreted based on the found archival images, the series features sofas, coffee tables, and cabinets complete with Dali-esque melting disco balls based on their predecessors at disco clubs in the 70s. AN talks to Berlin-based Studio 7.5 about their new seating series for Herman Miller Burkhard Schmitz and Roland Zwick of Studio 7.5 talk about their new seating collection “For You Everyone” at the Herman Miller Showroom in Milan. The exhibition showcased the Cosm series, inviting visitors to sit back and recline. Nendo’s exhibition: Forms of Movement Nendo’s self-exploratory exhibition, Forms of Movement, surveys materials and technologies in 10 conceptual iterations of an object’s function, material, or production process. Here we see a series of furnishings articulated by different shapes and formations of plasticized fabric. AN talks to Space Copenhagen about their collection for Stellar Works Danish design duo Signe  Bindslev Henriksen and Peter  Bundgaard Rützou of Space Copenhagen detail the inspiration behind the new series and how similarities in Asian and Scandinavian cultures transpire in their designs. A 1929 tram by Christina Celestino renovated as a traveling saloon AN rode the Corallo tram with designer Christina Celestino to hear about her inspiration behind the exhibition on wheels. Traveling to-and-fro between three stops in the Brera design district, the interior is reminiscent of 1920s art moderne interiors, specifically the cinema and screening rooms. AN talks to Icelandic designer Hlynur V. Atlason about his commercial series for Ercol Icelandic designer Hlynur V. Atlason details his collection of modular furnishings for Ercol, their first venture in commercial design. He explains this new take and his inspiration point that departed from the English brand’s seminal reference, the traditional Windsor chair. The Diner by Rockwell Group The design world crowds into the American-style diner installation inside a railway arch designed by The New York-based firm. Rockwell Group teamed up with Surface magazine, design consultancy 2x4, and Design Within Reach on the American-inspired establishment located beneath the tracks that lead to Milan's Centrale railway station. See more videos and photos on our Instagram @archpaper
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What we saw at Salone del Mobile 2018

Last week, AN visited the Italian design capital to see the newest releases by brands and designers. We highlight a few more of our favorites finds from Salone del Mobile and its EuroCucina exhibition, as well as a few satellite shows, below.  Filigrana Light Established & Sons Sebastian Wrong’s Filigrana Light for Established & Sons recalls glass making traditions from the 16th century. The orb is made by highly skilled artisans who spiral filigree stripes, continuously rotating the glass to and blowing it to make the final shape. Von Ercol Icelandic designer Hlynur V. Atlason designed Ercol’s first commercial collection of modular furnishings. The series presents a whimsy, colorful new take on the British brand’s hardwood furniture aesthetic based on the Windsor chair. Comprising a chair, an armchair, a work chair outfitted with a student-like arm-desk, a bench/coffee table hybrid, and a magazine table, each piece can be combined for various working environments. SHAPE Poliform Debuting at EuroCucina, this new kitchen model was shown in four configurations to showcase the five new finishes in oak,  glass, extra dark marble, metallic brushed lacquer, and Dekton Calacatta. The series includes a modular stainless steel and glass island system, two snack tables, stools designed by Jean-Marie Massaud, customizable backsplash/wall unit storage, extra-tall to-the-ceiling cabinetry, an extractible steel shelf/work surface, and a range of sliding worktop accessories. Kengo Kuma Alpi Japanese architect Kengo Kuma worked with the Italian wood surfaces outfitter to create a collection that accentuates the woodgrains of maritime pine and Japanese cedar. The grain itself becomes a stylized trope of aesthetic articulations of the material. The Japanese cedar is adorned with smooth, vertical texturing; meanwhile, the pine is characterized by the bark-like shapes split between deep cracks. Vision Snaidero Soft curves form human-centered, ergonomic base units for islands and peninsulas in this kitchen. The LED-lit structural framework outlines fluid surfaces integrated throughout, highlighting the integrated spaces that blur the boundaries between cooking, storage, and entertaining. Sculptural Glass Vases By Paul Surridge for Roberto Cavalli Home Inspired by the fashion house’s infamous animal patterns, the swirling configuration laced around the vessels emulates leopard, zebra, giraffe, and snake motifs abstracted as tactile, textured cladding. The series of ten sculptural glass vases were handmade by Tuscan glass masters and then produced by Arnolfo di Cambio, the glass manufactured established in Colle Val d’Elsa in 1945. Don't miss last week's Milan Design Week highlights! Click here
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Spotlight on ten designs from Salone del Mobile 2018

From April 17 to 22, all eyes in the design world are on the spectacular exhibitions, installations, pop-ups, and launches by an impressive lineup of designers and brands at Milan Design Week. From the International Bathroom and EuroCucina exhibitions to the satellite shows, here is a sampling of the designs—bravissimi!

Talisman Sconce Apparatus

Articulated by a raised pattern, this jewel-like sconce was inspired by Persian motifs that appear in Achaemenid stone reliefs, metalworking, and sculpture. It is part of a series that was inspired by Creative Director Gabriel Hendifar’s Iranian family heirlooms.

Circe Lounge Chair Ini Archibong for Sé

Swiss designer Ini Archibong collaborated with the London-based furniture maker famous for its 20th century-inspired designs. The work is a nod to Art Moderne, featuring the curving geometric lines of the back and base of the chair, and the round, curvaceous form of the soft, pink cushion.

STRUCTURES Kinnasand

Berlin-based Studio Greiling morphed a series of ottomans, benches, and daybeds into a rug-seating hybrid, exploiting the very often unexplored space in between floor and furniture. By draping rugs on top of colorful metal tubing, the fabric transforms into seating.

DeKauri Bath Credenza Daniel Germani for Cosentino

Spanish surfaces purveyor Cosentino and Italian furniture maker Riva 1920 worked with architect Daniel Germani to create a freestanding bathroom vanity that conceals the sink, lighting, storage, and mirror. Doors crafted out of 50,000-year-old Kauri wood open to a white Dekton by Cosentino sink, a Fantini faucet, and vanity-like lighting by Juniper Design.

Series Y Gensler for Artemide

Gensler designed a Mondrian-inspired fixture that accommodates both soft and bright lighting via two different screen profiles. The branchlike composition allows for configuration of direct or indirect illumination—all from a single power source.

Ratio Dada

Belgian-born architect and designer Vincent Van Duysen took a mix of warm and cold materials—wooden panels juxtaposed with natural stone countertops—and rendered them in modular, metallic grids for this kitchen.

Hawa Beirut Richard Yasmine

This otherworldly furniture collection is a nostalgic reflection of architecture in the designer’s hometown of Beirut, including arch-shaped references to Lebanese architectural elements, window-like glass inserts, slabs of marble, and handmade tassels. Swathed in pastel hues, the series comprises a set of chairs, a hybrid table/decorative screen, and a folding screen.

Drop Lindsey Adelman

With its metal, tubular structural system adorned with poetically placed globes, Drop recalls visual tropes associated with the 20th-century machine age. Administering a hand-applied mixture of salt and ammonia to the surface created the algae-like patina.

Kartell by Laufen Laufen Laufen, the Swiss bathroom outfitter, collaborated with Italian furniture purveyor Kartell on a conceptual collection of colorful washbasins, taps and fittings, storage units, shower bases, bathtubs, lights, and accessories. The result is a study of form and silhouette with brightly saturated accents of translucent acrylic, a material for which Kartell is famous.

Disco Gufram

Recalling the surreal disco balls by Dutch art studio Rotganzen, Gufram’s Charley Vezza envisioned three cabinets and two coffee tables as pedestals for melting mirrored disco balls for the Disco collection. Other items aim to preserve the brand’s iconic history of designing Italian dance clubs. Can you dig it?

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The newest addition to Milan Design Week: Ventura Centrale

Amid the general chaos and event overload of Milan Design Week, Ventura Centrale's inaugural show was instantly welcomed to the fray a "must see." Although the organizers describe it as Ventura Lambrate’s “big sister," the show is smaller in addition to being newer. And this works to its benefit: In contrast to the sprawling Tortona, Brera, and—with its new mega IKEA pavilion—Lambrate neighborhoods, Ventura Centrale is compact and makes a targeted impact. The show featured Matteo Zorzenoni with MM Lampadari, Nason Moretti and Scapin, Swiss design studio Panter & Tourron, Lee Broom, Maarten Baas with Lensvelt, Salviati with Luca Nichetto and Ben Gorham, and Baars & Bloemhoff. Each "hall" is located in warehouses below Milan's Central Station that have been closed for 30 years. Each display was distinct and memorable, with crowds increasing as the week went on. Lee Broom's rotating musical carousel, the "Time Machine," drew the longest lines, but each show was cleverly presented and perfectly finished, with very little of the amateurish qualities so often found in inaugural exhibitions. "Set" featured a series of room vignettes with furniture and blown glass pieces by Italian designer Matteo Zorzenoni with the rounded forms and pastel hues dominating interior design as of late, but rendered beautifully and given a new context in its gritty warehouse location. "May I Have Your Attention Please?" by Dutch designer Maarten Baas debuted his eponymous 101 chairs for Lensvelt, surrounded by an installation of bull horns emitting indistinguishable voices to dramatic effect. For Salviati Glass, designer Luca Nichetto and perfumer Ben Gotham created 53 "totem poles" out of some 23,000 sheets of glass, filling the massive terminal and reexamining the potential for classic glasswork. Baas and Blomhoff also took their materials to new heights by commissioning six up-and-coming designers to create something new with it. Daphna Laurens, a veteran of last year's Salone Satellite program, crafted a whimsical and serviceable chair, table, and light set; Sabine Marcelis formed modern, circular lights; Klaas Kuiken created an "inside out" cupboard and dresser; Paul Heijnen designed a gridded wall sconce; and rENS made a series of black stools and seats. While one hopes that Ventura Centrale is popular, we can't help but wish it will stay true to its inaugural year—a smart, fun installation that doesn't require hours of wandering or mapping to navigate.
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Japanese designer Hiroto Yoshizoe wins Lexus Design Award 2017 Grand Prix

After one year, 1,152 entries from 63 countries, 12 finalists, and four prototype presentations, Japan's Hiroto Yoshizoe has been named the winner of the Lexus Design Award 2017 Grand Prix during Milan's Salone del Mobile. The designer, who was a finalist in last year's competition with his water-activated color-changing planters, impressed the judges with PIXEL: an interactive device that utilizes a series of visors to create a range of light and shadow effects, inspired by a childhood memory of falling asleep to the glow of a television. The international design competition was first launched in 2013 to support up-and-coming creatives using design to build a better future. For its fifth edition, the innovation competition focused on the theme “Yet,” which Yoshizoe interpreted as the interplay between light and shadow—much like the way a sunset can be reflected on a cloud as a gradation of color. Yoshizoe is based in Tokyo and is a graduate from Musashino Art University. He explained PIXEL further in a press release: “This work does the same by acting as a filter screen to show the viewer the existence and fascination of light and shadow,” he said. In the final phase of the competition, Yoshizoe was partnered with Snarkitecture’s Daniel Arsham and Alex Mustonen, who mentored him during the prototype process. (The contest’s other industry mentors were Neri & Hu, Max Lamb and Elena Manferdini.) “What I personally was interested in were designs or concepts or projects that are more experiential, more about a sort of overall impression,” Mustonen said of the choice to partner with Yoshizoe. “The advice given from my mentors was very precise and accurate,” added Yoshizoe. "Their suggestion to test a form that I had not considered in the beginning allowed me to develop this work. They also gave me suggestions on new materials, which led me to a path that I did not expect. I am grateful for their advice.” Along with the industry mentors, the contest was judged by a panel of leading names including Paola Antonelli, Aric Chen, Toyo Ito and Alice Rawsthorn. As the Grand Prix winner, Yoshizoe’s design PIXEL will be on display at the LEXUS YET pavilion at the Triennial di Milano.
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BIG unveils “Alphabet of Light” installation with Artemide at Salone del Mobile

In tandem with this year’s Salone del Mobile Euroluce event, Artemide partnered with Bjarke Ingels Group to create a new light series, Alphabet of Light. Inspired by neon lights, BIG worked with Artemide to create an updated, LED light that could be formed into letters or graphics—creating a new font in the process. Alphabet of Light is composed of straight and curved light modules with high-tech optoelectronics to ensure a smooth, even light.

To showcase this new product, BIG and Artemide installed the modular system in the east courtyard of the Università degli Studi di Milano using the classic typography sentence, “Quick Brown Fox Jumps Over the Lazy Dog,” which uses every letter in the alphabet. The installation is part of the event Interni Material Immaterial.

For more Salone del Mobile and Milan Design Week coverage don’t miss The Architect’s Newspaper’s Instagram with our live updates.

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Product>Milan Highlights

We collected our absolute favorite furniture and accessories from in and around Salone del Mobile. Innovation and form combine to create pieces that we want right this instant. Paraventi Berluti x Ceccotti Collezion Ren Valet Stand Poltrona Frau

Designed by Neri & Hu, the collection takes its name from the shape of the Chinese ideogram ren, meaning “person” or “human being.” The pieces are comprised of similar elements, including Canaletto walnut, brass, and Cuoio Saddle leather, best displayed in this handsome valet stand.

Valet Collection by David Rockwell Stellar Works

David Rockwell’s collection is meant to symbolize a new sector of furniture that supports everyday living, working, and entertaining. The valet itself creates an area of reprieve to transition from the busy outside world into a relaxed home. The leather bag holds two pairs of shoes, and there is a walnut shelf for personal items in addition to brass hardware.

Leather Longue chair LL04 DePadova

A reimagined classic lounge chair that combines quality Italian leather with the Scandinavian functionality of designer and architect Maarten Van Severen. The stainless-steel structure is covered in either black or natural cowhide and finished with hand stitching.

Åhus Blå Station

Multicultural design collective OutofStock worked tirelessly with Blå Station’s owners-designers to create their second collaboration. The Åhus easy chair pays homage to the brand’s 30th anniversary by embodying the company’s values: Finding balance between modern and timeless.

Optical collection Lee Broom

A simple, yet graphic lighting collection by Lee Broom is inspired by Op-Art and was displayed all over Milan in a transportable installation entitled “Salone del Automobile.” Although on the outside it looked like an unsuspecting gray delivery van, inside it was an ornately decorated rendition of an Italian palazzo.

Gemma Sofa Moroso

Daniel Libeskind expands his Gemma collection for Moroso with the Gemma sofa, which is an exercise in small-scale architecture. The incredibly plush upholstery contrasts with sharp asymmetrical lines, and the design is inspired by both a precious gemstone and by 15th century Italian tapestries.

Serif TV Samsung

At Superstudio Più in Via Tortona, Samsung and the Bouroullec brothers joined forces to create a new genre of television, designed with an artisanal spirit that considers technology and technical characteristics as well as the consumers’ lifestyle aesthetics and emotions. The result is a monochromatic frame and furniture element unlike any other on the market.

Terra System Mosa

Stone is one of earth’s oldest building materials. Architects designing tomorrow’s landmarks seek its timeless look, but the most desired limestones and sandstones can be porous and problematic over time. Mosa’s expertise in stone-look porcelain is unparalleled, because their technology draws from nature and each tile is unique. Discover the top 5 places where porcelain tile makes a better choice than natural stone.

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Salone del Mobile Highlights

As usual, Milan Design Week was a whirlwind as architects, designers, dealers, journalists, and PR firms descended to the most storied furniture brands pavilions at Salone del Mobile and showrooms across the city. Here are a few highlights from the week:

Salone del Mobile Rho Fiera

The main event, particularly for the trade, spans over two million square meters and is housed in building by Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas. Thousands of pavilions were carefully crafted to attract furniture buyers, dealers, and press for the 55th Salone del Mobile. The larger brands have teams who spend up to a year designing pavilions, which have to be assembled in a week. Some impressive pavilions this year included Cassina’s recreation of the Rietveld Pavillion built in Holland in the 1955. Also impressive was Kartell’s “Talking Minds,” where each designer had his or her own “room” with video interviews playing on loop explaining the inspiration and methodology behind the designs, Arper’s carefully curated color stories, and Dedon’s verdant “Jungalow.” Cosentino’s creative rooms around the world by Canadian studio Ciccone Simone, complete with a full cafe serving up drinks and charcuterie. Salone Satellite was another must-see for the AN team, see our write up on it here. Also, don't miss our trend-spotting article on the Salone's chromatic glass.

Spazio Orlandi

A must-see for all, Rossana Orlandi’s gallery features a wide range of up-and-coming and independent designers from around the globe. This year, Spazio Orlandi was accompanied by Marta Di Bibendum next door where AirBnB and Ambra Medda hosted the extremely popular Makers and Bakers event. The entire café was furnished with the designs for people to use as they ate in the café. Norwegian Gallerie S.e. also hosted a minimal space with luxurious furniture in rich metals and velvet. Incredible designers such as Maarten BaasPiet Hein Eek, Yukiko Nagai, Alcarol, and Nika Zupanc.

Triennale

Set in Milan’s Sempione park, this year’s XXI Triennale theme "21st Century: Design After Design" was interpreted into exhibits such as Stanze (Rooms), Architecture as Art, Neo Preistoria, La Metropoli Multietnica, and more. We particularly enjoyed the Stanze at the Triennale musem, where visitors walked through a series of rooms designed by notable figures—Gio Ponti, Franco Albini, Carlo Mollino, Carlo Scarpa, Carlo De Carli, Vittoriano Viganò, Ettore Sottsass, Joe Colombo, etc—as well as newer architects, such as Andrea Anastasio, Fabio Novembre, Duilio Forte, Elisabetta Terragni, Carlo Ratti, and Francesco Librizzi. The focus was on Milan’s reputation as having architecture with plain exteriors and stunning interiors.

Atelier Clerici

Set in the stunning, hyper-elaborate rococo Clerici palazzo, young designers presented forward-thinking designs and concepts. RAM House by PROKOSS + Space Caviar offered a place to sit in the courtyard.

Inside the space, Aldo Bakker’s amorphous video installation Pause offered a preview of his upcoming retrospective at CID Grand-Hornu. SapienStone’s Smart Slab is an integrated cooktop design with technology that allows almost quarter-inch-thick stone to be heated, cooled, or transformed into a stovetop by touching the interactive surface. Textile brand Buro Belen used natural dyes that slowly change over time, reacting to touch, sun, and wear to show how materials interact with their users.

To learn more about some of the designers we saw at Atelier Clerci, don’t miss our upcoming May Interiors issue!

Valcucine at Brera Design District, Salone del Mobile 2016 from Architect's Newspaper on Vimeo.

Brera Design District

A sprawling neighborhood of showrooms for both furniture and fashion houses, a few Brera highlights included the incredible HAY market, a gymnasium with maze-like rooms packed out with the company’s wares. Hem presented a series of ice cream socials to celebrate Max Lamb’s new “Last Stool Splatter” collection. In addition there were works by Philippe Malouin, Karoline Fesser, and Studio DeFORM. The showrooms by Valcucine, DePadova, Boffi, Miele, Agape, Cappellini, Fantini, and more, opened their doors to display new designs and offer cocktails each night.

The Hotel Wallpaper in the Via San Gregorio arcade displayed collaborations among architects and designers to create a “hotel” with a bar, bedroom, bathroom, lounge area, and even a mini golf course created with thick Bolon fabric (a sponsor of the exhibit).

Via Tortona

Part block party, part exhibition space, Via Tortona hosted the SuperDesign Show and a gamut of events featuring designs by major brands and designers, such as Marcel Wanders, Naoto Fukasawa, and Maarten Baas.

The SuperDesign Show, 10,000 square meters of space, chose the theme White Pages, that according to the press release, “implies writing together the world waiting for us tomorrow…. An invitation to exhibit not only ready-to-use objects and proposals but also futuristic and experimental projects and to ‘narrate’ them to the public with words and installations in an ideal ‘white page.’”

COS X Fujimoto Forest of Light

Clothing and company COS collaborated with Sou Fujimoto for this room filled with fog, cones of light, and custom-made noises.

Spazio Lambrate

Located in a former gym in the north east Section of Milan, Spazio Lambrate features designers such as Roberto Negri, Arredi Siamo Scarti, Agostino Favarelli, and Laura Daza. It is part of a burgeoning creative district in Milan and we predict it will continue to be an important part of future saloni.

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Trend Spotting at Salone del Mobile in Milan: Chromatic Glass

There have been plenty of color and style trends occurring in Milan but the one that really took us by surprise was rainbow spectrum glass.
This collection of mirrors, side tables, and dining tables is a collaboration between Glas Italia and Patricia Urquiola (who herself seemed to be trending at the fair, with products designed for multiple brands).
At SuperDesign Show 3M, the maker of post-its collaborated with Stefano Boeri Architetti on an installation that uses films, nonwovens, and adhesives to create a kaleidoscopic tree that reflects light in colorful patterns and allows guests to recharge.
Eli5e designer Elise Luttik debuted a pair of chairs (at Salone Satellite) that really stood out—one stationary and another that swivels. The pair reflects geometric shapes on the wall and would liven up any office or home.
AGC Glass, a Japanese company that's a leading manufacturer of glass, chemicals, and high-tech materials, crafted an art installation at SuperDesign Show entitled Amorphous. It was inspired by amorphous molecular structures that don't have a definite shape. The installationis made with 5,000 pieces of thin, chemically-strengthened glass that fracture the light and creates a stunning display.
Also showing in the Satellite was Ini Archibong, who had been commissioned by design label Amen&Amen to create a collection inspired by literature and fantasy called The Secret Garden.
 The COG installation at Spazio Orlandi was designed by Moritz Waldemeyer for watch brand Panerai.
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The next big thing: Emerging designers at Salone Satellite

Perhaps one of the most interesting pavilions at Milan’s Salone del Mobile, Salone Satellite features top new and emerging designers from around the world. Whether it is a “magic” bookshelf, sustainably sourced alpaca furniture, or a light that syncs with your heartbeat, Satellite designers never fail to surprise and delight. Fondue Light by Satsuki Ohata Inspired by cheese (Ohata is a big fan of the stuff), the Fondue light contains a bulb that can be raised and lowered to create different levels of diffused or targeted light. As If From Nowhere by Orla Reynolds Irish designer Orla Reynolds created this modular bookcase for small spaces. A brightly colored table and four chairs tuck neatly among the shelves and can be pulled out as needed. Kinetic BioLab by Scottie Chih-Chieh Huangkinetic from Architect's Newspaper on Vimeo. Kinetic BioLab by Scottie Chih-Chieh Huang Part of the Taiwanese designer’s responsive, biologically-inspired work, this light syncs with your heartbeat when you touch it. Allpaka by Sophia Clark, Galiatea When Clark was traveling through Peru, she learned that although alpaca fur is one of the most luxurious materials in the world, the fibers are so short that cloth made with alpaca is often mixed with other materials—diminishing its quality. In her Allpaka line, the fur runs free with the softest, fluffiest furniture and pillows around. The alpaca hides used for the collection are sourced sustainably from animals that died of natural causes. Sander Lorier, Studio Lorier Lorier’s line of minimal, whimsical products seek to simplify and elevate everyday life. The designs are locally produced in the Netherlands from porcelain, copper, and wood. Fungi Collection by Alcarol At first glance Alcarol’s work may look like a standard glass and wood construction, but up close the resin and petrified wood is anything but. The wood is left raw, creating textural interest across the furniture’s surfaces. Taac by Henry & Co. Using 100 percent recycled, sustainable materials Henry & Co’s Taac module, half bathroom half kitchen is made from hemp, coconut, quartz, electric cables, bamboo, clay, limestone, and a radiating plate.
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Product> Kitchens + Baths: The Latest Designs from Europe

At Salon del Mobile, the specialized trade show Eurocucina focuses on innovation in kitchen systems and appliances. This year, trends include a fascination with dark woods and the evolution of wall cabinets from closed boxes to open shelves. On the bathroom front, exhibitors at the Salone del Bagno were promoting unusual finishes and materials for plumbing fixtures and fittings. Valcucine Riciclantica Acciaio Now available with a glass worktop, ultra-thin doors, and a redesigned backsplash panel that facilitates installation around utility lines. Designed by Gabriele Centazzo. Snaidero Ola 25 In Ferrari Red lacquer, this limited-edition design commemorates the quarter-century anniversary of the kitchen manufacturer. Designed by Pininfarina. Scavolini Foodshelf Designed specifically for open-plan residences, the storage is modeled after living room furniture, rather than traditional kitchen cabinets. Designed by Ora-ïto. Leicht Xtend+ Automated louvered cabinet fronts can be raised and lowered via remote control or smartphone. Elmar @home The black walnut cooking island is modeled after a Venetian rowlock. Suspended steel cylinders house ventilation, lighting, and audio speakers. Designed by C+S Architects. Cesar Kalea Aluminum door-frames can be fitted with glass, wood, or ceramic panels in a variety of colors and finishes. Designed by G.V. Plazzogna. Kreoo Gong Available in four marbles, this 32-inch-by-13-inch basin can be installed as a countertop vessel or on a compatible pedestal. Designed by Enzo Berti. Dornbracht MEM in Cyprum Finish This new rose-gold-colored finish is a nuanced interpretation of polished copper; available on select fitting collections for bath and kitchen. MEM was designed by Sieger Design. Rexa Esperanto This component-based system provides flexible design alternatives that can be adapted to baths of different sizes and configurations. Designed by Monica Graffeo. Geberit Monolith A compromise between bulky floor-mounted commodes and in-wall installations, this toilet features a shallow tank that is sheathed in white or black glass. Axor Axor Starck V Fabricated of glass, this bathroom mixer puts hydrodynamics on display, with a swirling vortex created whenever the tap is turned on. Designed by Philippe Starck. Laufen IlBagnoAlessi One  Offered in 35-inch and 47-inch versions, the curves of this console basin complement the strong lines of the walnut vanity cabinet. Designed by Stefano Giovannoni.
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Zaha Hadid’s Boldly Curvaceous Forms and Surfaces from Milan

While much of the work introduced at Milan this year played it safe—distinctly conservative colors, forms familiar from the 1950s, cautious use of materials—some architects' designs took, shall we say, a bolder stance. But: Was it a better one? You, ever-opinionated reader, shall and no doubt will be the judge of that. Among the boldest of the bold designs this year were four pieces presented by Zaha Hadid. Most photos we've seen of the aluminum Manta Ray seating underscore its unfortunate semblance, not to the graceful sea creature, but to a giant human posterior. At AN, we're taking the high road, featuring this more abstracted view of the piece. But it may not be enough to erase the obvious imagery. Here, Hadid has designed a fireplace, which appears to have melted into a puddle of black marble. Ironically cold design, for an interiors element that generates heat. Thumbs up on this one. A rectangular top is a disciplined extension of the vaguely tripod-ish base. Great stone fabrication, and we wouldn't even mind bumping our knees on the legs of this terrific table. A welcome departure from the blobby, yes? But the mid-point of the unit seems to be a bit dysfunctional for shelving, lacking any level horizontal surfaces, but hey, it's all about the cantilever. Looking back on Salone 2014, it's interesting that one can fairly easily discern which pieces were architect-generated versus those that were created by industrial designers. The latter are trained (and paid) to produce commercially viable furniture collections, while the former are free to indulge in the making of domestic monuments.