Posts tagged with "Russia":

Placeholder Alt Text

The 2019 Aga Khan Award for Architecture winners split a $1 million prize

Every three years, the Aga Khan Award for Architecture is given to building concepts that “address the needs and aspirations of societies across the world in which Muslims have a significant presence.” The award was established in 1977 by the Muslim spiritual leader Aga Khan, with the belief that modern architecture often failed to meet the needs of non-Western societies.  Now in its 14th cycle, the six 2019 winners have been selected by a master jury of nine architects and scholars, including David Chipperfield, Elizabeth Diller, and Ali M. Malkawi, as well as David Adjaye, who served on the steering committee. The projects were selected from a shortlist of twenty buildings that represented sixteen countries and the finalists will share a $1 million prize with all of those involved in the realization of the project—architects, engineers, artisans, and builders.  As follows, here are the six winning projects from Bahrain, Bangladesh, the West Bank, the Russian Republic of Tatarstan, Senegal, and the United Arab Emirates The Revitalization of Muharraq  In 2013, The Authority for Culture & Antiquities Conservation Department of Bahrain began a series of restoration and adaptive reuse projects to highlight the World Heritage Site’s history in the pearl trade. The project has since evolved into a program titled Pearling Path, Testimony of an Island Economy which has created new public spaces that aim to “re-balance the city’s demographic makeup.” Arcadia Education Project  The Arcadia Education Project was designed by architect Saif Ul Haque Sthapati and was completed in 2016. Sthapati developed the modular, amphibious structure out of three types of bambooa solution that would avoid disrupting the existing ecosystem by allowing the building to rise with the water levels during monsoon season. The structure incorporates space for a preschool, a hostel, and a nursery.  Palestinian Museum Selected through an international competition, Dublin-based architects Heneghan Peng completed the 430,000 square foot Palestinian Museum in 2016. The zigzagging forms of the museum sit atop a terraced hill overlooking the Mediterranean and the building is clad with locally quarried Palestinian limestone. The LEED Gold-certified museum is intended to “foster a culture of dialogue and tolerance.” Public Spaces Development Program In an ongoing program for The Republic of Tatarstan, over 300 public spaces have been improved since 2015, including public gardens, beaches, walkways, and parks. The participatory design process encourages engagement with local citizens in an effort to offer equal quality spaces for all members of the community while reflecting on each place’s unique culture and history.  Alioune Diop University Teaching and Research Unit Te Alioune Diop University in Senegal has been functioning far beyond capacity since 2012. Spanish architects IDOM were asked to design a new addition with a 500-seat lecture hall, thirteen classrooms, and three labs, as well as offices and meeting rooms. Using local labor and materials, the building features a 660-foot-long lattice wall which provides passive cooling desirable for the tropical climate.  Wasit Wetland Centre The Dubai-based X-Architects transformed a “wasteland into a wetland” as a part of an initiative by Sharjah’s Environment and Protected Areas Agency. The Wasit Wetland Centre has helped restore the area’s natural ecosystem while providing visitors with information on biodiversity and preservation efforts.
Placeholder Alt Text

Chernobyl's aging sarcophagus will be torn down, replaced soon

The historic sarcophagus at Chernobyl is slated to be partially dismantled to make way for a safer structure very soon. The Ukranian company that manages the formerly-radioactive site—home of the world’s most famous nuclear disaster—is taking it down preemptively before the 30-year-old structure falls.  According to Popular Mechanics, the concrete-and-steel, half-domed architecture, also known as the Shelter, was built in just 206 days after the 1986 explosion in Soviet-era Ukraine. As the Russian-occupied state was trying to sort through the mess, the government hired “liquidators,” or clean up agents, to construct the sarcophagus atop the deadly site. Though many died because of the work, it successfully kept radioactive chemicals such as corium, uranium, and plutonium from exposing the surrounding city—and the world—all these years.  Despite its remarkably quick construction and decades of decent performance, the sarcophagus was actually built quite poorly, without any welded or bolted joints due to the inexperience of the workers. It became clear that after just over a decade, the sarcophagus would need to be replaced. Popular Mechanics noted how in a 2017 interview with BBC, an expert on nuclear safety recounted that the Soviets lowered the beams for the building and built the roof structure using helicopters. Nothing was made to be very sturdy.  The SSE Chernobyl NPP, which oversees the site today, said it will start taking the insecure architecture apart after the New Shelter Containment (NCS), a building plan that was pieced together two decades ago, is up and running. The build-out of the NCS is currently in progress by a French consortium of construction groups called Novarka and, according to World Nuclear News, it’s the “largest moveable land-based structure ever built.” BBC identified the “vast new tomb for dangerous waste” as larger than Wembly Stadium and taller than the Statue of Liberty. The NCS is expected to make the site safe for up to 100 years and will help it withstand dangerously high temperatures, a class-three tornado, and a 6.0 earthquake—all things that the sarcophagus is prone to crumbling because of now. Officials are also testing the equipment and technological systems used on the NCS ahead of its soon-to-be full operation. 
Placeholder Alt Text

World’s first cross-country cable car will link Russia and China

The Blagoveshchensk–Heihe Cable Car, designed by Dutch-firm UNstudio, will be the first-ever cross-border cable car. The project will be built across the Amur River allowing passengers to easily move between Russia and China. The Blagoveshchensk–Heihe Cable Car includes two international lines and four cabins, and each car will have the capacity to carry 60 passengers plus luggage. The total trip will take approximately seven-and-a-half minutes total, while actual travel time from station-to-station will be three-and-a-half minutes. The project is backed by Strelka KB, a Russian-based urban-planning and strategy consultancy. Following a vision round involving 12 practices, UNstudio was selected as the winning team from a competition to design the cross-border cable car. Strelka KB was also responsible for developing the economic and functional model of the cable car terminal. UNstudio has also designed the terminal station in the city of Blagoveshchensk, Russia while the architect of the station in Heihe, China has yet to be announced. The terminal is designed to reference the historic connection between the two cities that are separated by the Amur River. When the river ices over in the winter, it has historically become a link that supports trade, commerce, and social relationships between the otherwise unconnected areas.  The building will feature views of both cities, as a “beacon” for joint prosperity. The public roof terrace will overlook the river towards Heihe, and framed views of Blagoveshchensk greet passengers at the arrival platform. Likening the design to an “air bridge,” Ben van Berkel, founder and principal architect of UNStudio, stated "This context provided rich inspiration for the Blagoveshchensk terminal station, which not only responds to its immediate urban location, but also becomes an expression of cultural identity and a podium for the intermingling of cultures." Cable cars have recently become more popular as a transportation solution. Van Berkel believes that these systems, “provide a new form of public transport that is sustainable, extremely fast, reliable and efficient.” In Oakland, BIG has proposed gondola-like cars to connect the Oakland A’s stadium to public transportation. Before winning the Blagoveshchensk–Heihe competition, UNstudio proposed two other designs for cable car systems in Gothenburg and Amsterdam.
Placeholder Alt Text

Pepsi denies plans to advertise in space

Soft drink giant PepsiCo has shot down reports that it plans to advertise in low Earth orbit (LEO), after reports surfaced last week in Futurism that the company was working on a “space billboard.” Using a small fleet of satellites armed with reflective mylar sails, the company was reportedly going to advertise a new drink called Adrenaline Rush, targeted to a “stereotyped” minority—gamers. Enter Russian company StartRocket, which has proposed using CubeSats—satellites that measure 4-inches-by-4-inches-by-4-inches—to create orbital billboards that would be visible all over the planet. The tiny satellites would be ferried into LEO via a rocket, and their solar panels and large mylar sails would unfold after the satellites were ejected from the main vessel. The CubeSats would then arrange themselves to form an image or message, and the “billboard” would be visible at dawn or dusk as they reflected sunlight. Although costs have been dropping and the same basic principles that StartRocket wants to build off of have been used for artistic purposes, no form of space-based advertising has ever been successfully deployed before. If the company can make its CubeSat system work, its floating advertisements would circle the Earth from approximately 250-to-310 miles away and would have a viewable surface area of about 19 square miles. On April 13, it seemed that Pepsi was going to be the first soda in space. A Russian PepsiCo spokesperson, Olga Mangova, told Futurism that the company had partnered with StartRocket and was working to create the advertising campaign of the future. Then, Pepsico made an abrupt about-face. “We can confirm StartRocket performed an exploratory test for stratosphere advertisements using the Adrenaline GameChangers logo,” a PepsiCo spokesperson told SpaceNews. “This was a one-time event; we have no further plans to test or commercially use this technology at this time.” However, as Futurism points out, this was likely an attempt by PepisCo to deflect criticism after the company came under heavy fire on social media over the proposal. A PepsiCo spokesperson "clarified" that there had been a translation error between the media and the company's Russian employees, and that they had been referring to a high-altitude balloon test earlier in April, not a future campaign. That wouldn't make sense, as Futurism had originally queried them over their future plans, and Mangova confirmed that they would be using an "orbital billboard"—distinctly different from a balloon. StartRocket were similarly unable to provide updated information on any ongoing, or past, PepsiCo collaborations. While no laws prohibit advertising in space in such a way that would be visible from Earth, it’s likely any real attempt to create an unavoidable billboard in the night sky would be met with pushback. Still, if it becomes cheap enough, the night sky could one day become home to airborne advertisements (but asteroid-anchored condo towers remain unlikely).
Placeholder Alt Text

Herzog & de Meuron completes Moscow tech campus building

Herzog & de Meuron has completed the first building in a massive new tech campus being developed outside Moscow. The Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech) University East Wing Building is the hub of District 3 of the five-district Skolkovo community. Skolkovo is a new ground-up development meant to be a home for research and technology just outside the Russian capital. District 3 houses the area's university, Skoltech, which will live in the new East Wing Building and two forthcoming structures also designed by the star Swiss firm. The new 1,442,000-square-foot building takes the form of a massive partially-filled ring with a 919-foot diameter. The outer ring and two smaller inner rings house academic facilities, shared spaces, and an auditorium, while staggered bars stretch across the building to house workshops and laboratories. A large basement floor runs across the structure's footprint to accommodate support and technical facilities. A jigsaw roofline cuts across the bars and rings to unite the structure. One result of the building's distinctive parti is a collection of courtyards of various shapes and sizes. These outdoor areas are framed by the building's striated facade, which materially codes the ring and bar spaces. The rings are clad in vertical larch wood fins, while white aluminum fins skin the bars. The building is not the first ring-shaped structure for Skolkovo. In 2010 David Adjaye completed a building for the Moscow School of Management Skolkovo with a large circular podium topped by cantilevering bars. Foster + Partners more recently completed Apple's headquarters with another circular design for a tech campus.
Placeholder Alt Text

Zaha Hadid Architects selected to design a sound wave–inspired concert hall in Russia

Zaha Hadid Architects has been chosen to build the new Sverdlovsk Philharmonic Concert Hall in Yekaterinburg, Russia. The city of Yekaterinburg, home to the world-renowned Ural Philharmonic Orchestra, has established itself as a cultural and artistic center of Russia. The Philharmonic is known for its sold-out performances in the existing Sverdlovsk Philharmonic building, which dates back to 1936. The orchestra’s new home will serve as an inspiring auditorium and public plaza for the people of the city. The new Sverdlovsk Philharmonic Concert Hall is characterized by its flexibility, unpredictability, and audacious architectural aesthetic. The design of the building was inspired by the physical characteristics of sound waves: floors, walls, ceilings, and canopies seem to flow, vibrate, and intertwine with one another in effortless and continuously smooth motions. Zaha Hadid Architects’ design incorporates a 1,600-seat concert hall and a 400-seat chamber music hall, all burrowed within the undulating surface of the suspended canopy, which will extend above the lobby and enclosed urban square. Within the lobby, massive glazed facades blur the boundary between interior and exterior, calling visitors to experience the artistic spaces within. Above the canopy, a public rooftop terrace overlooks the city’s Church of All Saints. “Russia has been a formative influence on Zaha Hadid Architects’ creative work,” said Christos Passas, project director at Zaha Hadid Architects, in a statement. “From very early in her career, Zaha was attracted to the Russian avant-garde who conceived civic spaces as urban condensers that catalyze a public realm of activity to enrich creativity and community; allowing space itself to enhance our understanding and well-being.” These principles of urban creativity and ingenuity are embedded within the design of the new concert hall, which utilizes a series of public spaces to strengthen the bond of inner-city residents. Sverdlovsk’s Ministry of Construction and Infrastructure Development organized the design competition with the help of the charity for the Ural Philharmonic Orchestra.
Placeholder Alt Text

Architects gather to discuss Russia’s young housing market

Nearly 50 percent of Russians live in 50-year-old Soviet-era block housing. A full 75 percent of Russians live in cities. These two statistics, combined with a changing relationship with home ownership, means the country has a rare opportunity to rethink the way its people are living. This is exactly what some of Russia’s most forward-thinking urbanists and architects are working on right now, and this was the basis for The Living Environment: All About Housing forum. Held this past May in Kaliningrad, the furthest west city in the country, the forum brought together experts in housing, development, and economics from Russia, Europe, and the United States to discuss Russia’s unique position. The country's current situation has been evolving for nearly 70 years. A housing crisis after World War II led to the building of tens of thousands of Khrushchyovka, the typical 5-to-10-story prefabricated concrete apartment blocks which still cover Russia and most of the former Soviet republics. Built throughout the 1950s and 60s, many of these housing blocks have now fallen into severe disrepair, often never having been intended to have been lived in for half a century. While the federal government has overseen the redevelopment of city centers and public spaces throughout the country, it is now up to private developers, a profession that did not exist before 1991, to replace the aging housing stock. Kaliningrad is a particularly appropriate site for such a conversation, as even more than many other Russian cities, it was built almost completely of these now-decaying housing blocks. After being nearly completely destroyed as a German city during World War II, it was rebuilt over a few short decades as a Soviet city. It only opened to outsiders in the early 1990s because it was primarily a military hub but like many Russian cities, it is in a state of rebirth. Led by the urban think tank Strelka KB, an offshoot of Strelka Institute for Media, Architecture and Design, and the urban development institution DOM.RF, the forum presented new projects and urban initiatives from across the country. The main event of the forum was a series of talks given by representatives from each of Russia’s eight federal districts, and keynote addresses from Winy Maas of MVRDV and Martin Biewenga of West 8, among others. While each of the federal district presentations highlighted the regions’ most successful projects, Maas and Biewenga presented the work their respective offices are currently doing in Russia. “There is a need for new buildings, and there is competition between developers. It is still a niche market, and some of them are doing in a brilliant way [sic]. They are making things more colorful, more differentiated, and very practical,” Maas told AN while explaining the near future of Russian urbanism. “But there is still a long way to go. Because it is not only the housing that needs to be updated. On the other hand, the urban environment needs updating. The spaces between the houses need to be turned into nice spaces.” This sentiment was echoed by Biewenga and West 8, whose current public space project was underway just minutes from the forum at Dom Sovetov Square. Situated at the base of the city's never-completed 21-story House of Soviets, the project is set to bring entertainment facilities and amenities to the barren landscape surrounding the ominous tower. The project is an example of the work being doing across the country by KB Strelka, which is working closely with the city and West 8 on the project. The Living Environment forum was also used to announce the winners of DOM.RF’s and Strelka KB’s most recent ideas competition and to launch its current one. The competition to design concepts for standardized housing and large residential developments drew many international entries, including the winners, Rome-based TA.R.I.-Architects. Its project touched on concepts about diversification and customization of form and space, two things that are the antithesis of Soviet housing blocks but were recurring themes at the forum. The current competition takes a more pointed look at apartment layouts of large housing blocks. Along with direct consultation on projects like the Dom Sovetov Square, Strelka KB hosts real and speculative competitions. One of the major roles it has been able to play is helping city officials to write better briefs for public projects. A task that involves balancing economic, social, and technical considerations, while pushing for ambitious proposals. Recently, this played out in Strelka KB’s involvement in the development of the much-lauded Diller Scofidio + Renfro-designed Zaryadye Park, the first new park in 70 years in Moscow. Russia’s situation may be somewhat unique in the world, but the current dialog is very much international. Few places have been so urban for so long, and none have a history so defined by mass social housing. And now with a public that is for the first time an active player in a housing market, the possibilities seem wide open. Russia’s future is ripe for innovative ideas that may have a very real effect on how the rest of the world is living as the world catches up with Russia's urban density. Like Le Corbusier and Frank Lloyd Wright, architects may soon once again be looking to Russia for its revolutionary approaches to city building.
Placeholder Alt Text

DS+R's Zaryadye Park in Moscow is a hotspot for public sex

  A Diller Scofidio + Renfro-designed park in Moscow is getting a lot of attention this week after security cameras caught numerous people having sex within the 35-acre green space on Friday. Zaryadye Park, a massive landscape located across from the Kremlin along the Moskva River, opened last September to the public after a dedication ceremony from Russian President Vladimir Putin. DS+R’s $245 million design was selected out of 90 submissions in an international competition in 2013. In the project description, the architects describe the park as a place featuring “Wild Urbanism,” with intertwining sections of landscape and hardscape, natural and artificial. The parkland includes a mix of indoor and outdoor spaces with a 229-foot cantilevering river overlook, a media center, nature center, restaurant, market, two amphitheaters, and a philharmonic concert hall to come next spring. Charles Renfro, head architect on the project, said he’s thrilled at the park’s overwhelming popularity. “I love this!” he told Artnet in an email. “What freedom our park has brought to Moscow and what tolerance it seems to be engendering from the authorities.” The Moscow Times reported that the city’s chief architect, Sergei Kuznetsov, is apparently okay with the sexual escapades happening within the public park and attributes the unprecedented uptick to the safety and comfort that Moscow offers visitors and residents. Some local lawmakers, however, feel the opposite. Getting caught for having sex in public in Russia means up to 15 days in jail. DS+R’s 14,000-square-meter vision takes up a quarter of downtown Moscow and is the first large-scale park built in the city in 50 years. The site was formerly populated by a Jewish enclave in the 1800s, and once served as the foundations of a never-built Stalinist skyscraper. For nearly 40 years, it was the home of the largest hotel in Europe, the 21-story Hotel Rossiya, until it closed in 2006.
Placeholder Alt Text

Here are 7 Russian architecture projects to check out before the World Cup begins

As preparations and celebrations unfurl for the 2018 FIFA World Cup kick-off in Russia tomorrow, AN has rounded up our favorite up-and-coming projects (and new sports venues) across the country. From James Bond-esque houses and parachute-themed neighborhoods to massive new developments, Russia has provided a playground for high-profile firms to experiment with new forms. Below are some of the wildest and most ambitious projects announced or completed recently, including the venues for the games themselves: Silhouette Location: Moscow MVRDV The modular Silhouette was the result of a design competition that concluded in January of this year and will serve as a “gateway to Moscow” once completed. The 256-foot-tall, mixed-use complex contains a bit of everything—luxury apartments on the top floors and a roof terrace, offices, a sports center, and a grocery store at its base. The pixelated tower block will be clad in a red ceramic tile, and the form takes cues from abstractions of Moscow’s skyline and the constructivist Ministry of Agriculture building across the street. The extrusions and sculptural cuts at the building’s base were carefully planned to create an inviting presence at ground level. Tuschino District Residential Development Location: Moscow Steven Holl Architects and Kamen Steven Holl Architects and Kamen Architecture Art-Group have proposed a new “Parachute Hybrids” typology for their residential development in Moscow’s Tushino district. Drawing inspiration from the site’s history as a former paratrooper airfield, the vertically-oriented slabs and horizontal bases have been run through with circular cuts reminiscent of parachutes drifting through the sky. Tushino will offer residences of every type and target every income bracket, while a new kindergarten and elementary school will serve residents in the development. “Tushino can be an important urban model for 21st century high density living, shaping public open space,” said Steven Holl. “The new building type we have proposed here, inspired by the site’s history, is unique to this place.” Capital Hill Residence Location: Moscow Zaha Hadid Architects The recently completed Capital Hill Residence was the only private house designed by Hadid herself, and the towering form bears all of the late architect’s signature biomorphic curves. Rising above the tree line of the Moscow’s Barvikha Forest like an emerging submarine, the house’s prominent “mast” seemingly floats 72 feet above the landscape and provides sweeping views. The building’s base gradually tapers into the earth below and provides a private area for the homeowner to retreat to. The organic shape of the concrete and dramatic change in elevation is meant to give viewers the impression of something fast-moving and fluid. Admiral Serebryakov Embankment master plan Location: Novorossiysk Zaha Hadid Architects and Pride TPO (Moscow) ZHA will be responsible for revitalizing nearly 35 acres of coastal neighborhood along the Black Sea in Novorossiysk at Russia’s largest port. Residents can expect new opportunities for outdoor leisure activities on the Black Sea, a new port, marina, new piers, and a weaving of the new areas into the city’s existing urban. The master plan will also bring nine new buildings to the waterfront, each representing a different stage in a sequential iterative design, creating a sweeping, wave-like skyline in the process. The one million square feet of new space will be used for a hotel, civic and conference spaces, and offices. The project is moving quickly, and construction on the first phase will begin in the second half of 2019. Ekaterinburg Arena Location: Yekaterinburg PI Arena (2015-2017 renovation) Originally built in 1956 as the multi-sport Central Stadium, Ekaterinburg Arena was recently renovated in 2011. Although it was modernized, the arena’s 20,000-seat capacity meant that another round of work would be needed to bring the arena up to FIFA’s 35,000 seat minimum. Another renovation took place in 2015 that saved the building’s historic facade and increased the stadium's capacity, but temporary seating to bring the arena’s capacity up to 45,000 seats was still needed, and has been installed behind both goal areas for the four World Cup games being played there. Volgograd Arena Location: Volgograd Sport-Engineering A spiraling lattice swirls around the base of Volgograd Arena, one of the stadiums built for this year’s World Cup. The project was built on a budget, but the exposed superstructure, squat single-piece form, and colorful cable roof makes it architecturally distinct from many of the Soviet-era venues made from concrete. After the World Cup, Volgograd Arena will have its seating capacity reduced down to 35,000 and the stadium will become the new home of local football club Rotor Volgograd. Nizhny Novgorod Stadium Location: Nizhny Novgorod OAO Stroytransgaz A light and airy stadium at the fork of two rivers, Nizhny Novgorod Stadium was designed with elements of air and water in mind. The white-and-blue color palette and spacious use of columns to create open-air areas helps lend the stadium a feeling of openness. At night, the building emanates light from the top and sides through its semi-transparent facade. The stadium was commissioned for the 2018 World Cup and was completed last year. The building boasts a 45,000-seat capacity and will be handed over to football club Olimpiyets Nizhny Novgorod after the World Cup is over.
Placeholder Alt Text

Tallest U.S. building by a Russian architecture firm gets approval

Moscow–based firm Meganom has just gained approval for the tallest project by a Russian firm in the U.S., a 1,001–foot residential supertall at 262 Fifth Avenue in Manhattan. The New York City Department of Buildings (DOB) gave the go-ahead for the tower on Tuesday, just over a year after the application was filed. The developer behind the project is Boris Kuzinez of New York–based firm Five Points Development. Kuzinez has spent $102 million already on site preparations, but is still seeking a construction loan for the tower itself. The architect of record is SLCE Architects. Consulting for the exterior wall has been conducted with Front Inc., with facade maintenance by Entek Engineering. Renderings for the skyscraper show a lean silhouette of a building punctuated by two observation decks. According to the designer, the apartment units, each measuring approximately 47 by 52 feet, will be anchored to an aluminum-clad column on the western side like shelves. All of the building's lift and mechanical systems will also be housed within this volume, allowing the residential space to be open and column-free. 41 apartments will be available in total, with floor-to-ceiling windows on the northern and southern facades. The design also accommodates customization: potential residents will be able to choose from a "library" of different layouts, with the option of purchasing full and multiple floors as well as portions of levels according to their needs. The building's top floor features a tall open space that offers 180-degree views to the north and south of Manhattan. According to the firm's website, the top observation deck can be reserved for private events by the building's residents. Triple-glazed windows facing north and south will stabilize the building's heating and cooling systems. Smaller, porthole-shaped windows will dot the building's eastern side. According to The Real Deal, a triplex apartment within the building could be worth as much as $75 million. Two structures on the site have already been demolished to make way for construction. A third structure at 260 Fifth Avenue will be preserved as part of the tower's base. There is no set timeline for construction. This is Meganom's first project in the U.S.

Open International Competition for Standard Housing and Residential Development Concept Design

The Open International Competition for Standard Housing and Residential Development Concept Design has been officially launched. Architects and bureaus from all over the world are invited to develop projects of innovative housing for future generations of Russians. Applications can be submitted at https://dom-competition.ru until December 25th. Competition participants are required to develop 4 types of houses for one of the urban environment target models: low-rise, mid-rise and central. Competition entries will be judged by compliance with the Competition Brief and the solutions they provide, the potential for application in different climate zones, and expected cost of construction and maintenance. In February, 2018, 20 finalists will be announced, each of them receiving 1 million roubles (about € 14,600). During the following six weeks, they will have to adjust their projects according to recommendations of the Competition’s Jury. Following the Second Stage of the Competition, winners will be selected:
  • up to five winning projects will be awarded 2 million roubles (about € 29,200) each;
  • up to five runners-up will receive 1.5 million roubles (about € 21,900) each;
  • up to ten projects will be granted a third-place prize of 1 million roubles (about € 14,600) each.
Terms and application forms are available at https://dom-competition.ru.
Placeholder Alt Text

MoMA exhibit will examine Constructivism during the rise of the Russian avant-garde

This December, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York will showcase the role of Supremacism and Constructivism in Russia's art world between 1912 and 1934. The emphatically titled exhibit, A Revolutionary Impulse: The Rise of the Russian Avant-Garde, will fall in line with the centennial of the Russian Revolution in 2017 and display works relating to the realms of painting, drawing, sculpture, prints, book and graphic design, film, photography, and architecture. A Revolutionary Impulse: The Rise of the Russian Avant-Gard will feature works from some of Russia's leading figures within the aforementioned disciplines. These include Vladimir Tatlin, Iakov Chernikov, El Lissitzky, Kasimir Malevich, Vladimir Mayakovsky, Lyubov Popova, Alexandr Rodchenko, and Vladimir and Georgii Stenberg, among others. The exhibition will use their work to show the sense of creative urgency, radical cross-fertilization, and synthesis that was present during the era. The exhibit will also illustrate the Russian avant-garde's impact on the sociopolitics and the production of art at the time. In addition, utilitarian objects that reflect that period's changing in production methods and social and political climate will be on display. Architecture–and in particular, Constructivist architecture—is due to feature in A Revolutionary Impulse. Work from renowned Constructivist Vladimir Tatlin will be exhibited; they were famously seen at The Last Futurist Exhibition of Paintings 0.10 (zero-ten), held in Petrograd (now St. Petersburg) in December 1915. Nonrepresentational counter-reliefs–reliefs with a particularly pronounced tensionfrom Tatlin's rare Brochure for Tatlin’s counter-reliefs exhibited at 0.10 are due to be on display. Tatlin, though, isn't the only Constructivist architect who'll be featured. Iakov Chernikov's Architectural Fantasies: 101 Compositions in Color, 101 Architectural Miniatures–his work to imagine a future symbolizing the avant-garde culture within the Soviet Union, never realized due to Joseph Stalin's opposition to the Constructivism movement—will also be on view. As too will be Kazimir Malevich's Suprematist composition Airplane Flying which was exhibited alongside Tatlin and Chernikov's work at 0.10, 101 years ago. Malevich's later Suprematist compositional workWhite on White (1918), one of the iconoclastic paintings during its time, will also be exhibited. A Revolutionary Impulse: The Rise of the Russian Avant-Garde will be open to the public from December 03, 2016 through March 12, 2017.