Posts tagged with "Rome":

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The American Academy in Rome seeks a new director to start in 2020

The American Academy in Rome (AAR) announced earlier this week that they are seeking a new Rome-based director to begin in July 2020 for an initial term of three years (2020-2023), with the potential for two one-year renewals.  The current director, John Ochsendorf, assumed the role of the institute’s 23rd director in 2017 and will not be renewing his term. Originally selected from a large pool of candidates, Ochsendorf proved to be a great fit for the role due to the breadth of his research and academic experience.  After earning his bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees in engineering at Cornell, Princeton, and Cambridge Universities, respectively, Oschendorf began teaching at MIT. His interests lie in the history of construction, masonry mechanics, and sustainable design, and has collaborated with art historians, architects, and engineers, and has studied and structurally assessed many historic monuments from around the world. As his three-year appointment is coming to an end, AAR is looking for a new director that matches the impact and expertise Ochsendorf brought to the table. The role involves working alongside the Academy’s president Mark Robbins on the intellectual and programmatic activities for all of the Academy’s activities in Rome. Together, they aim to push forward the Academy’s mission to create a “dynamic international community” of art-historical scholarship.  The job description describes the main responsibility of the role is to “mentor, nurture, and advance the work” of the diverse group of scholars, artists, and designers that have been awarded Rome Prizes across a range of fields in the humanities. The academy’s Fellowship fields include Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance, and Modern Italian studies. Ochsendorf himself was the first engineer to be awarded such a prize in 2007. In an email correspondence, AAR told AN, “While we would love for John to extend his time with the Academy as director, his home institution (MIT) is eager to have him back. We certainly do not blame them, as he continues to have an amazing impact on the AAR community and the institution as a whole.”
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Rome and the Teacher brings roofscapes to Rhinebeck

‘T’ Space 137 Round Lake Road Rhinebeck, NY Through August 24 This summer, ‘T’ Space, a gallery and performance venue established by Steven Holl, will present the work of Holl’s former professor and inspirator, the architect and academic Astra Zarina, in the exhibition Rome and the Teacher. Guest curated by Alessandro Orsini, the show is inspired by Zarina’s 1976 book on Roman roofscapes, I Tetti di Roma, and her contributions as a groundbreaking female figure in the profession. Photographs by the architect Balthazar Korab, who coauthored I Tetti di Roma, as well as theoretical writings, models, and historical maps relay the Latvian-born Zarina’s professional journey, including her experience as the American Academy in Rome’s first female architecture fellow and her lifelong project of restoring the “città che muore” (dying town) of Civita di Bagnoregio. Photographic prints will wrap the gallery space, and a video created by Columbia architecture students will align the exhibition material with newer concepts about design’s engagement with public life—a theme central to Zarina’s work, teaching, and legacy.
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Italian artist Matilde Cassani creates a veritable sunset made with glitter

A glittery exhibition at Rome’s new interior design center, Cantiere Galli Design, presents a dreamlike landscape constructed within the confines of a small room. Sunset, designed by up-and-coming Italian artist Matilde Cassani, is a site-specific project that invites visitors to step into another shiny, immersive dimension. The piece is part of an ongoing series set up within the two-year-old show space called A room of one’s own. For her contribution, Cassani placed traditional furniture pieces sparingly within the room while covering the walls with a shimmery gold palette. At the center of the space is a minimalistic table holding up a mirror that reflects a hanging curtain depicting a yellow sun on the back wall. On top of the table are sprinkled shards of vibrantly colored paper that add another layer of pop to space. The whole room, a large abstract setup, is meant to seduce people immediately upon entering. “Visitors, attracted by the sleek, ultra-glossy surfaces, leave a trace when they run their fingers on every smooth texture,” said Cassani. “The sunset is thus ever-changing, transforming daily, as each visitor passes by.” Cassani’s piece is the successor to Andrea Anastasio’s vision for A room of one’s own. Both artists were asked during the 2019 season to design their concepts around the theme of “leaving a trace,” which was chosen by curator Domitilla Dardi. “The spaces we live in are far from being tidy, perfect, and neat like the ones we see on magazines or ads,” he said in a statement. “The spaces we live in are a reflection of our imperfect and of its extraordinary uniqueness. ‘To live means to leave traces’ said Walter Benjamin.” Sunset by Matilde Cassani opened in late November and is on view through April 2019 at Cantiere Galli Design in Rome, Italy.
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A new book on Rome's urban formation probes its political and historical roots

In one of his last interviews, Vincent Scully claimed, “When you go abroad for the first time, most of your thoughts are about your home. Because you need to define yourself as you confront a very different culture.” Americans, Scully believed, “experienced this phenomenon with special intensity.” Indeed, for traveling American architects, going back to Daniel D.H. Burnham and forward to Robert Venturi, and of course for Scully himself, this was never truer than with regard to their experiences in Rome. In Rome: Urban Formation and Transformation, the author, Jon Michael Schwarting, maintains a certain distance from the American academic context and produces a rational, detailed examination of Rome (and other Italian cities) and a method of investigating and understanding architecture and urbanism by searching its rational basis. Both of these aims are achieved without claiming historical precision but by using history in a polemical, rather than factual, manner. A collage of a great amount of information and studies regarding Rome’s urban structure, this material was gathered over years of research, formally conducted at Cornell University in the 1970s and further elaborated in five case studies by students working in Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture program in Rome during the early ’80s. Schwarting was a student of Colin Rowe’s at Cornell, who, Charles Jencks said, “[gave] the younger generations of architects the metaphor of the past, of history, of references, as a viable generator of present form.” Influenced by Rowe’s vision, the author collects historical, analytical, and graphic data derived from these elaborate examinations of the ancient city, which is seen as a perfect case study to comprehend and demonstrate how urban formation, transformation, and architecture in general are in a critical relationship with the concepts of the ideal, the utopian, and the physical reality. Schwarting’s principle interest is to explore how, at various scales, the political, social, and cultural scenario of a specific time in history has influenced the forma urbis and affected its architecture. Rome, he proposes, offers a critical example of these dynamics for the American architect: The city’s developments and transformations have always been in a dialectic relationship with the existing environment. This urban strategy begins with the development of the Roman Republic and Imperial periods, gradually modified by medieval urban fabric, and finally transformed in the Baroque period by Bernini and even Borromini. Schwarting starts by clarifying fundamental concepts required to examine and understand the city’s history. At first, he introduces the issue of the progressive use of tradition in architectural language, which leads directly to the debate regarding utopia, the ideal, and the real and their dialectical relationships within architectural speculation. This argument was the main concern of Renaissance intellectuals such as Da Vinci, Scamozzi, Vasari, Filarete, and Francesco di Giorgio Martini, who all engaged in the designing of perfect, ideal cities. The author points out that none of these prototypes, except for Scamozzi’s fortified city of Palmanova, were ever built. According to this, the author states that—platonically—the enthusiasm typical of the early Renaissance treatises must be interpreted as instructive for cities’ potential transformation rather than reflecting an ambition for actual construction. The solution was instead realized in the adaptation of ideal principles and rules, derived from classical knowledge, to the real, existing conditions, with respect and according to a context that was rarely intended to be altered. In particular, the book focuses on the period from the 15th to the 18th century, between the Renaissance and Baroque periods, in which Rome was to be completely transformed into the new center of Christianity. The city needed a rethinking of its structure in order to create monumenti, piazze, chiese, e palazzi for the new dominant aristocratic families and for the Vatican, with a large flow of pilgrims. Popes Giulio II, Clemente VII, and Sisto V saw the possibility of giving Rome new life by creating ideal spaces and conditions in fragmented interventions related through a complex radial street system developed from important urban nodes in order to reach each other. Sisto V ultimately wanted to create an urban stellar system, namely, Roma in sideris forma. The lesson learned from Rome is a realization of how the principles of the ideal and the perfect would be impracticable for the whole but can exist in fragments, in a dialectical relation with the real, chaotic physical context in which the Renaissance architects, instructed by popes and noble families, imagined their projects as a representation or a recollection of the idea of perfection. Schwarting writes: “Each architect built according to the existing city, developed strategies to enhance the ideal plan notion, by creating a building and spaces that reinforced it.” These projects “are ideal set-pieces inserted into an existing urban fabric and, thereby, provide a degree of order, by providing a reference [...] for the surrounding area.” It is important to mention the quality of the graphics—produced thanks to extensive analysis and fieldwork by the researchers and students—are exceptional and very rigorous. These technical hand drawings aim to visualize the architecture and buildings in relation to their context and to the city as a whole, exemplifying a concern to consider each piece as part of a more complex structure. To conclude, we could quote Giancarlo De Carlo in his description of the work for the Piano Programma in Palermo by Giuseppe Samonà, to portray the research by Schwarting in Rome as well. “He [Samonà] used to spend all his energy—both physical and intellectual: The surveys in Palermo were long and frequent, and his days at work started early in the morning and finished late at night, when he used to go out with students to have an arancino or a gelato, depending on the season.” Rome: Urban Formation and Transformation By Jon Michael Schwarting, Applied Research & Design $30.59
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Seeing Rome through the eyes of Robert Venturi

Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture is not an easy book, or so we were told by Vincent Scully in the introduction to Robert Venturi’s seminal 1966 publication. The book’s release is the stuff of modern architectural mythology. When initially published, Venturi’s text signified a daring step away from modern orthodoxy. It encouraged the design community to actively participate in broad architectural discourse, to treat the past as prologue rather than discarding it as merely vestigial. The book was loathed by many. Treated as critical contraband, it was seen as incendiary and vulgar, and was perceived to be a jab to the prevailing momentum of Western architectural progress. However, to a small fraction of midcentury architects, the book was a welcome embrace of architectural inheritance. It was a permissive, if soft, manifesto allowing designers to stretch out, to embrace a messy and nonlinear practice, to get a little weird. Frederick Fisher and Stephen Harby proudly identify with Team Venturi. The first pages of Robert Venturi’s Rome, to which both contribute text and watercolor illustration, celebrate the profound influence Complexity and Contradiction had on the way they practice, teach, and understand the built environment. Reading the book as students proved to be a shared watershed moment. Fisher immediately shifted focus from art and art history to architecture, and has worked in Rome as both an architect and Rome Prize Fellow. Harby received the book from Vincent Scully in a fateful transaction that led to a Rome Prize Fellowship and a recurring teaching position in the Eternal City. Robert Venturi’s Rome is ostensibly a travel book for the architecturally inclined, exploring some, though not all, of the Roman sites referenced in Complexity and Contradiction. Fisher and Harby “propose to take the reader on a journey through time and ideas by visiting and discussing nearly thirty Roman places that exemplify Venturi’s revolutionary ideas,” and they use the Complexity and Contradiction table of contents, and supplemental quotes from the original text, as a framework for ten short tours. Unsurprisingly, by pairing buildings and urban spaces with the tenets of Venturi’s work, including “ambiguity,” “contradiction” (both “adapted” and “juxtaposed”), and the “double-functioning element,” Robert Venturi’s Rome is quickly revealed to be more complex, and yes, more contradictory, than a standard travel guide of the Fodor’s or Rick Steves variety. Fisher and Harby pragmatically outline locations and hours of operation, but eschew detailed photography for their own watercolor illustrations. The images of buildings, architectural elements, and plans are gorgeous, lovingly rendered and evocative, but leave details to be examined solely by text. Accordingly, the text often carries an unevenly distributed burden. Venturi populated Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture with more than 250 images, mixing architectural photographs and drawings with mannerist and abstract paintings, an approach that buttressed his criticism and apologia. Conversely, Fisher and Harby are successful when describing formally familiar work, like the Pantheon or Casa Girasole, but struggle when examining complicated baroque spaces, like Francesco Borromini’s San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane.   Vacillating between highlight reel and inside baseball, the tone of the book is inconsistent. It is simultaneously a travelogue for the architecturally curious and a series of esoteric incantations relying on the erudition of the reader to spot the sly relationship between Fisher and Harby’s text and Venturi’s design exegesis. The esteem in which the authors hold Venturi—and his work—and their admiration for Roman architecture is evident. Venerating both theorist and city, Fisher and Harby note, “it is possible that, without acknowledging it, Venturi…is celebrating the fact that in the hands of Borromini and many other architects, classical language is a living, fluid thing, and not the dead language that Venturi’s modernist contemporaries would have considered it.” By design or otherwise, the publication of Robert Venturi’s Rome feels timely and in keeping with a broader revivalist spirit currently underway. It fits easily with the recent Ettore Sottsass show at the Met Breuer, the successful effort to designate Kevin Roche and John Dinkeloo’s Ambassador Grill as a New York City landmark, and the recognition of the glass pyramid–topped Musée Louvre renovation with an AIA 25-year award. Still, it takes a unique kind of architectural navel gazer to appreciate the meta-narrative of a book about a book by an architect designing buildings about architecture. Scully suggested that Complexity and Contradiction might shift our professional perspective from the Champs d’Elysées to Main Street. Through thoughtful analysis and vivid illustration, Fisher and Harby remind us that Rome is a complex city of interwoven Main Streets populated by both historic exemplars and idiosyncratic oddities. Robert Venturi’s Rome “evokes many levels of meaning and combinations of focus,” write the authors. “Its space and its elements become readable and workable in several ways at once.” Coincidentally, so does Robert Venturi’s Rome. Brian Newman is an architect and university campus planner and has taught at Washington University in St. Louis. Robert Venturi's Rome Frederick Fisher and Stephen Harby, ORO Editions, $25.00
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In London, a new exhibition speculates on the future of Rome

On view at the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) in London is When in Rome - A Collective Reflection on the Eternal City. The exhibition combines two previous shows, Re-Constructivist Architecture, which was at New York's Ierimonti Gallery, and Unbuilt Rome, which was on view at CAMPO in Rome. Both shows closed earlier this year, but are re-opened together in this show. Curated by Jacopo Costanzo, Giulia Leone and Valentino Danilo Matteis, When in Rome exhibits 22 projects from 19 architecture firms and designers from around the world who have all plunged into Rome's past to reframe an architectural future for the city. As a testament to their united vision, the two previous exhibits' convergence at RIBA allows two strands of speculative approaches to architectural intervention in Rome to be viewed in unison. It becomes evident that fundamentally they speak the same language—be it an abstraction or adaptation of the past or a reaction to it. Fitting in 22 projects is no mean feat. Like Re-constructivist Architecture did at the Ierimonti Gallery, projects fill the three walls. However, RIBA's "Practice Space," where the exhibition is located, does so on a larger scale. The extra space means that models—some of which could not be shown in New York—are afforded more room, though they cannot be viewed in the round. While the exhibits in New York and Rome placed the projects' accompanying texts at eye level, in the RIBA show, sometimes viewers are forced to crouch or craning their necks to read them. Aside from this, the means of conceptual representation in When in Rome sheds light on emerging trends in architectural representation. Collages and similar graphic methods are favored by most, with the projects from Re-constructivist Architecture using classical motifs or settings to engender a sense of identity and historical connection within new Roman architecture. In When in Rome, classical art and architecture is often abstracted to reimagine locales, producing artwork that riffs on this classical frame of reference. This can be seen with the work of Portuguese studio fala atelier, French firm jbmn architects, and False Mirror Office from Italy. Seeing the projects together makes it clear that the two exhibitions this show derives the work from converge well together. Projects such as Supervoid's adaptation of Adalberto Libera's never-realized Augustus Mausoleum and Shrine to the Fallen soldiers in East Africa and La Macchina Studio's Triumphal 17 fit well with the manifesto of Re-constructivist Architecture, despite both originally being for Unbuilt Rome. Despite the similarities between the works and themes in Re-constructivist Architecture and Unbuilt Rome, the projects are displayed separately, but without any markers separating them. The projects from "Unbuilt Rome" are bound together by Jacopo Valentini' photographs of the nine sites that never saw the presented projects constructed. Co-curator Jacopo Costanzo told The Architect's Newspaper (AN) that both of the exhibitions used Rome "as a theatre." He believes the array of projects could be seen as a sign of contemporary trends rather than as a unified movement. "The show at RIBA can present a sort of contemporary map of what it's going on in the generation of architects born in the 1980s," Costanzo added, noting that many architecture studios featured in When in Rome are young practices, with many based either in Italy or with experience working in the country.  When in Rome - A Collective Reflection on the Eternal City RIBA Practice Space 66 Portland Place, London, W1B 1AD Through October 8.
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Delve into "Piranesi’s Rome" at The Blanton Museum of Art in Austin

With more than 40 prints examining the antiquities and architecture of Rome, along with large-scale maps of the city, books, and plaster casts of Greek and Roman architectural fragments, Piranesi’s Rome celebrates Giovanni Battista Piranesi, regarded as one of the greatest printmakers of the 18th century. Piranesi, who considered himself an architect as well as an artist, is best known for his use of the etching medium to create prints of Rome’s architecture, including the ancient Roman aqueduct system, and fantastical buildings that could only exist in the dream world.

Piranesi’s Rome Blanton Museum of Art 200 E. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. Austin, TX Through August 20

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American Academy in Rome announces 2017 Rome Prize winners

The American Academy in Rome announced its winners for the 2017–18 Rome Prize, a fellowship that supports advanced independent work and research in the arts and humanities. This year’s 29 recipients will receive a stipend, workspace, and living space at the Academy’s 11-acre campus in Rome to pursue further work among peers. Winners are selected annually through a national competition process and evaluated by an independent jury of scholars and artists. Highlighted below are the individuals that won the prizes for architecture, design, historic preservation and conservation, and landscape architecture. Architecture Founders Rome Prize Brandon Clifford Assistant Professor, School of Architecture and Planning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Ghosts of Rome Arnold W. Brunner/Katherine Edwards Gordon Rome Prize Keith Krumwiede Visiting Associate Professor, Department of Architecture, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Associate Professor, College of Architecture and Design, New Jersey Institute of Technology A Pattern Book of Houses for a World After the End of Work Design Mark Hampton Rome Prize Jennifer Birkeland and Jonathan A. Scelsa Partners, op.AL The Roman Roof-Scape—The Atrium as Landscape–Urban Infrastructure Cynthia Hazen Polsky and Leon Polsky Rome Prize Tricia Treacy Assistant Professor, Graphic Design, Department of Art, Appalachian State University modes + methods of dialog + collaboration Historic Preservation and Conservation Charles K. Williams II Rome Prize Lisa Deleonardis Austen-Stokes Professor, Department of the History of Art, John Hopkins University A Transatlantic Response to Worlds That Shake: Jesuit Contributions to Anti-Seismic Building Design in Early Modern Italy and Peru Booth Family Rome Prize Liz Ševčenko Director, Humanities Action Lab, The New School + Rutgers University–Newark Confronting Denial: Preservation for a Post-Truth Era Landscape Architecture Garden Club of America Rome Prize Rosetta S. Elkin Assistant Professor, Graduate School of Design, Harvard University; Associate, Arnold Arboretum Shorelines: The Case of Italian Stone Pine Prince Charitable Trusts/Rolland Rome Prize Alison B. Hirsch AND Aroussiak Gabrielan Co-founders, foreground design agency, Los Angeles, California; Hirsch: Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture + Urbanism, School of Architecture, University of Southern California; Gabrielian: Ph.D. Candidate in Media Arts + Practice, School of Cinematic Arts, University of Southern California Rome Real-and-Imagined: Cinematic Fictions and Future Landscapes For more on the 2017–2018 Rome Prize winners, see this list here. For more on the American Academy in Rome, see its website here.
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Roundtable in Rome highlights new ways for young architects to practice

"Generazione: A Call From Rome," a tavola rotunda or round table, was just convened at the Acquario Romano, home to the city’s Casa dell'Architettura di Roma. The gathering aimed to address a range of issues relevant to the generation of young architects just entering into professional practice. This new approach, according to Jacopo Costanzo, organizer of the tavola rotunda, asks architects to “draw from archives—mental, digital, or printed on paper... distant from the typical parametric and highly schematic rationales that characterized the last thirty years of design in architecture.” It is a movement asking for a break from the digital practice so dominant in the profession, and a return to a more locally and culturally focused approach. It featured two young architecture practices committed to newer and—for them—more authentic approaches to working in the world. UNULAUNU, from Zurich, Switzerland/Bucharest, Romania, and TRAUMNOVELLE, from Geneva, Switzerland/Brussels, Belgium, are committed to moving away from an obsession with digital production as the only tool for design and toward a new way of conceiving, presenting, and thinking about design. For example, TRAUMNOVELLE's three principals, Léone Drapeaud, Manuel León Fanjul, and Johnny Leya, claim to champion “a multi-disciplinary approach with architecture at the crossroads.” They eschew traditional client relationships and instead seek their own areas in which to apply their architectural educations. Instead of working to find clients, they imagine their own projects merging the conditions of contemporary life and then use “architecture and fiction as analytical, critical, and subversive tools to emphasize contemporary issues and dissect their resolutions.” Their non-traditional research practice is not necessarily a unique one for a young firm without commissions but these Belgians leave little room for a move into a conventional mode of production. The roundtable discussion by Nicola Di Battista of Domus, architect Giuseppe Pasquali, artist Nancy Goldring, historian Lea-Catherine Szacka, and this writer, spoke about the history of new approaches to architecture, the value of drawing as a mode of production, and the special conditions of Italian design. The commentators—from their different perspectives—all supported the new approach but warned about the pitfalls faced by past attempts to create new models of practice. It is hoped that these young practices were not fazed by these critics and instead that this first call from the home of so many other architecture revolutions will produce another.
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Floating "Cloud" sits within Studio Fuksas-designed convention center

After nearly two decades of designing, planning, and construction, Rome-based architecture firm Fuksas's $262 million Rome-EUR Convention Center is finally complete, along with an adjacent hotel. Dubbed the "Cloud" due to a suspended white curvaceous volume that dominates the 592,000-square-foot space and appears to loom over the concourse, the convention center has been in the making for some 18 years with design work starting in 1998. Now, though, the building is fully open and accessible to the public. It's located in the EUR area of Rome—an area known as being a business and residential district. Encasing the "Cloud" is what Fuksas call the "Theca." The steel structure uses a double-glass facade to expose the cloud to passersby and give the white volume visual precedence. "The 'Cloud' represents the heart of the project. Its construction within the 'box' of the Theca underlines the juxtaposition between a free spatial articulation, without rules, and a geometrically defined shape," described Fuksas on their website. "The Cloud is the distinctive architectural element of the project: The steel rib structure... provides an extraordinary visual effect, and is covered by a 15,000-square-meter transparent curtain." Inside, visitors can access numerous exhibition spaces and auditoriums, part of a flexible space that boasts a seated capacity of nearly 9,000. Included within this is a grand 1,760-seat auditorium (found toward the Cloud's rear) that also offers snack points and support services. Meanwhile, large conference rooms totaling 6,500 seats can also be found within the center. (Courtesy Moreno Maggi) (Courtesy Moreno Maggi) The "Cloud" and "Theca" are two of three elements that "define" the scheme. The third is the "Blade"—a slender 441-room hotel that lies next to the convention center. Fuksas sees it as being an "independent and autonomous structure." All in all, the scheme is touted to make between $330-440 million-a-year, quickly recouping its construction costs. A climate-control system will also aid the scheme's finances in terms of energy usage: Variable flow air conditioning mediates homogenous gains in rooms prone to crowding and photovoltaic elements facilitate the on-site production of electricity.
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Navigate the Classical way through Rome with the Nolli map on your iPad

The Nolli map, a product of twelve years of copious research by Italian surveyor Giambattista Nolli, is a navigational tool that has truly stood the test of time. Completed over 250 years ago in 1748, the map has now found another breath of life thanks to app developer Martin Koppenhöfer. Originally engraved into twelve copper plates, Nolli's map was the most accurate representation of Rome available. While that may not be the case today, the map has retained much of its accuracy over the years thanks to Rome's preservation, with notable landmarks such as the Colosseum and Pantheon still standing tall. This veracity can be seen when the map is over satellite imagery of Rome, as can be seen below. Subsequently, viewers can explore how Rome has developed as a city since the map's creation. Vehicle travel was, of course, not a factor in 1748, though Koppenhöfer commented that "pedestrian navigation is very different… you don’t have to know every street or turn, just go into the right direction.” “In designing the present edition,” Koppenhöfer continued, “we have spent great care with the aim to be as close to the original as possible regarding the labeling and the structure of the directories. Therefore the app reproduces....[the] notation as provided by Giambattista Nolli in his indices. By selecting an entry you will be led to the corresponding location on the map. You can also browse by tapping on one of the numbers on the map to see what it is about.” Available on iOS devices, the map is also usable online. Here, courtesy of University of Oregon, the map is accompanied by a series of essays relating to the map. For example, The Walls of Rome by James Tice and Allan Ceen from the university's Department of Architecture analyze Rome's city walls from the 8th century B.C. to the 1500s. Using the map, they outline the city perimeter at various dates: "The wall circuits of Rome provide a frame of reference for the city both as a measure of its growth and prosperity and also as a testament to the vicissitudes of a great city, its image of itself, and the practical needs for security during times of travail and even during times of peace," they say. Another essay by James Tice, The Forgotten Landscape of Rome: The Disabitato, looks at how Nolli's map illustrates Rome's former uninhabited and forgotten places. Other texts look at the cartographic qualities of the map. As for the map itself, “The explanations of the signatures and line styles,” said Koppenhöfer, and “hatches and selected abbreviations are reproduced in their original form. You can access Nolli’s original spelling of the indices, legend, and other signs at the bottom of the English version in Italian language.”
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Winners of the Young Architects Program MAXXI merge theatrical sets, symbolism, and performance

Milanese practice Parasite 2.0 has won the Young Architects Program (YAP) MAXXI 2016 competition with its installation MAXXI Temporary School: The museum is a school. A School is a Battleground. In its sixth year, the program to recognize young architects with a pavilion commission was organized by MAXXI in conjunction with MoMA/MoMA PS1 of New York. Producing "mobile sets that erase the boundaries between natural and artificial," Parasite 2.0 was selected for its ability to reflect the notion that contemporary architecture is the creation of a "scene."  This is done explicitly via the use of wood, rubber, and metal, all composed to form a pop-art-esque movie set on wheels. Vibrant colors, flashing lights, and even cactii cut-outs give the project the distinctive feel of Las Vegas. Among the symbols that adorn Parasite 2.0's sets is a crying luminescent emoji. Meanwhile, over-exaggerated forms and objects take on a satirical tone. The mobile scene, said MAXXI, will be the "backdrop to the museum’s summer events and for the thousand-like selfies of its visitors, but also a reflection on the disappearance of the boundary between space and its representation." An international jury chose Parasite 2.0 as the winner due to its "project’s characteristics place it at the borders between architecture, set design, art and performance." In a statement, organizers said, "Its victory was decreed by its playful, welcoming composition, the inclusion in the project important aspects relating to tis communication and “social” interaction and lastly its ties with a museum, theatrical and cinematographic construction tradition deeply rooted in the history of Rome." Parasite 2.0, primarily a production and research lab, is comprised of Eugenio Cosentino, Stefano Colombo, and Luca Marullo. Together, their work stems from the dynamic of architectural production and urban life. The jury included Pippo Ciorra, Senior Curator MAXXI Architettura; Margherita Guccione, Director MAXXI Architettura; Hou Hanru, Artistic Director MAXXI; Monia Trombetta, Coordinator MAXXI Arte; Sean Anderson, Associate Curator of Art and Design MoMA; and Massimo Alvisi, Alvisi Kirimoto + Partners. The winner was chosen from a shortlist that also included Deltastudio (Ronciglione – VT), Angelo Renna (Prato), de gayardon bureau (Cesena), and demogo (Treviso).