Posts tagged with "Rojkind Arquitectos":

Placeholder Alt Text

Michel Rojkind on his raw and powerful Foro Boca concert hall in Veracruz

The Foro Boca concert hall opened to the public December 1, 2017 in Boca del Río, Veracruz, Mexico, with a concert by the Boca del Rio Philharmonic Orchestra featuring acclaimed violinist Joshua Bell. Designed by Rojkind Arquitectos, the remarkable building is the central piece of a city in transformation. Iker Gil of MAS Studio and Julie Michiels of Perkins + Will spoke with architect Michel Rojkind to discuss the main aspects of the building. The Architect’s Newspaper: Can you talk about how you became involved in Foro Boca and how it related to the larger urban challenges in Boca del Río? Michel Rojkind: Miguel Ángel Yunes Márquez, the then-mayor of Boca del Río, started the Boca del Río Philharmonic Orchestra in 2014, and that has since become the heart of the cultural life in the city. The mayor asked us to design a home for the orchestra, and at the time there were three possible sites. The chosen one was located in a deteriorated area of Boca del Río where the Jamapa River meets the Gulf of Mexico. We decided then to think about the building as part of a larger urban regeneration project that also could tie to a three-mile boulevard that the mayor had already started to work on to improve the pedestrian experience along the waterfront. How does Foro Boca connect to its immediate context? One of the first key aspects was to turn the nearby breakwater into a pedestrian space. Also, the building entrance, besides being protected from the strong north winds, is connected to a series of public spaces. As the mayor had already chosen granite for the boulevard, we included it in our project so that the boulevard would go right into the building. Our aim was to make sure that the public spaces were considered as important as the building, giving back to the community by extending our plazas toward the beach, the breakwater, and the city. The building is raw, powerful, and stripped of superfluous elements. Can you talk about its overall composition and materiality? We wanted to use a material that was able to withstand and respond to the harsh conditions of the place, so we chose concrete with a texture running in different directions. We were interested in the way it would develop a patina over time, similar to the nearby rocks in the breakwater. Initially, the project started as a big box that we broke down into smaller programs to give it the proper scale toward the beach, the pier, and the city. As you move around Foro Boca, your perception of the volumes’ scales changes. And it was important for us to make a building that had no front and back. For instance, the area where the trucks load and unload the instruments becomes an exterior plaza. It is about creating overlapping uses rather than hiding them. The interior of the building also challenges our perception of scale, with an interesting sequence of compression and release. As you enter the building under a compressed space defined by a cantilevered volume that is 7.5 feet tall, you begin to understand the spatial organization around the main concert hall. The double- and triple-height spaces with skylights are quite dramatic, as you are coming from the dark compressed entrance in contrast to the exterior light and then it opens up to these spaces with light washing the walls. And there is a sense of fluidity in the spaces. You see people going up the stairs, moving through the mezzanines, and entering the concert hall through different access points. It was important for us to translate the continuous movement that is present in music or in the nearby waves. Foro Boca continues with your studio’s philosophy of providing added value to each project, envisioning new opportunities beyond the original scope of the project. Can you describe how added value manifests in this specific case? Besides the main program of housing the orchestra, we wanted to design a space that could accommodate multiple activities at the same time and host diverse cultural manifestations, not just concerts. After the opening concert, Foro Boca hosted White Canvas, an audiovisual piece by Cocolab, and a few days later the first edition of the National Book Fair in Boca del Río. Now that there is a building that can house all these activities, there will be more and more opportunities to bring interesting artistic expressions. The important thing is to maintain the quality of the culture that is inside. It is interesting to consider Foro Boca in relationship to your Cineteca Nacional project. Both public buildings commissioned by the government, they have similar ambitions as civic anchors beyond their specific programs. Can you talk about the relationship between both projects? When I started to work with the mayor on Foro Boca I was a bit skeptical because I had a really hard time with Cineteca Nacional. We were being criticized for a building that had opened to the public unfinished. But the process in this case was very different and with more time for design. Also, the mayor of Boca del Río is very passionate about art in general, and the orchestra in particular, so I knew we could work in a different way. To me, the most important part of the Cineteca project is the exterior space, the places where people gather and where unexpected things occur. For that reason, in Foro Boca, we fought to include the exterior plazas as a key part of the project. Each project creates different experiences, but both have exterior spaces that are very successful. When film director Peter Greenaway visited Cineteca Nacional, he pointed out that the gardens were his favorite area, as they were the spaces where the quotidian happens. Foro Boca is a project that synthesizes the ideas and lessons we learned from Cineteca Nacional. It is a building that is distilled to very few elements, creating a powerful experience that you feel is part of the site.
Placeholder Alt Text

Rojkind Arquitectos designs jagged waterfront concert hall to boost Mexico’s reputation as a music and cultural hub

Capitalizing on the recent rise of Boca del Rio's cultural profile, construction has begun on a new waterfront concert hall in Veracruz, Mexico. The Foro Boca will house the Boca del Rio Philharmonic Orchestra, formed last year to incite interest in the region as a cultural and musical center, and kickstart a masterplan to regenerate the local architecture. Positioned as an antidote to the area’s rising crime and pollution levels of the last 20 years, the concert hall by Mexico City–based Rojkind Arquitectos includes an 850-seat concert hall, rehearsal space, music library, and offices. The striking concrete edifice of jagged volumes fronts the breakwater between the mouth of the Jamapa river and the Gulf of Mexico, its geometry referencing the adjacent jetty. The tallest of these volumes houses the concert hall. Visitors enter the building through a triple-height lobby, which leads to the music halls and the library. The 50,000 square foot building will also have a 150-seat chamber music room to host monthly chamber music concerts, while an after-school choral and musical program for low-income children will also be held. On the third floor is a terrace with sweeping views of the ocean and river. Foro Boca’s location converges with Avenue Zamora, which is lined with local restaurants, and is being eyed as a potential catalyst for local gentrification. “The building appropriates the timeless expression of the concrete cubes formed by ripraps in the breakwater, assimilating them as its origin and reinterpreting them in a building made of apparent concrete, forming various areas of volume that contain the concert hall,” said Rojkind Arquitectos founding partner, Michel Rojkind.
Placeholder Alt Text

Facades pro Michel Rojkind on value-added building envelopes

Known for their playful, cutting-edge facades, Rojkind Arquitectos are adept at transforming obstacles into opportunity. Founded in 2002, the Mexico City–based practice is regularly challenged with delivering a sense of cohesion to unplanned urban chaos. As the literal and metaphorical mediator between a building's interior and its context, the envelope is a crucial starting point for any such endeavor. "Our first approach is through digital design and local fabrication, depending on the geography of the project, time, budget, etc.," explained founding partner Michel Rojkind, fresh from the July 7 groundbreaking of the firm's Foro Boca concert hall in Veracruz, Mexico. "We research local craftsmanship to enhance the final results." Besides considering the more pragmatic elements of design and execution, said Rojkind, "We also try to question what a facade is, in terms of performance or how it can produce other areas that blur the line between building and [exterior]." For him, the most intriguing question facing contemporary designers and fabricators is: "How can facades bring added value to the project—not only in economic terms, but also as social innovation?" Rojkind will deliver the opening keynote September 10 at Facades+ Miami, the South Florida debut of the popular conference series on high performance building enclosures. Speaking of architectural conditions in the conference's host city, Rojkind—himself an old hand at designing for a hot, sunny climate—said, "I think there are great opportunities to really push for interior/exterior living connections and blur those boundaries. [We can] learn from the past while embracing future social interactions as a design [guide]." Hear more from Rojkind and other movers and shakers in the AEC industry, and participate in exclusive local field trips, at Facades+ Miami this fall. For more information or to register, visit the conference website.
Placeholder Alt Text

Facades+ PERFORMANCE It’s a Wrap!

We just wrapped up the latest installment of our Facades+ conference series. It was our most successful event yet! The response was overwhelmingly positive as hundreds of eager professionals converged on Chicago to discuss the most exciting breakthroughs in facade technologies. With sold-out workshops, standing-room-only panels, and sponsors already signing up for next year, Facades+ PERFORMANCE surpassed our greatest expectations! "The Facades+ conference hits the sweet spot between design, engineering, the industry, and the academy, so there's really something for everyone," said AN executive editor Alan G. Brake. "The Chicago conference, at the beautiful IIT campus ablaze with fall color, was one of the most successful to date. It was two days full of inspiring, behind the scenes stories of how great buildings are made and the important technical knowledge that is advancing the profession.” Facades+ PERFORMANCE, presented by AN and Enclos, marked the sixth event in our expanding legacy of conferences. Focusing on the most pressing issues in design, construction, and fabrication of cutting-edge facades, Facades+ has traversed the nation to bring critical dialogs on the building skin to the innovative processionals at the heart of the AEC industry. This year, the crowds went wild as keynote speakers Stefan Behnisch (Behnisch Architekten) and Gerardo Salinas (Rojkind Arquitectos) discussed the rapidly evolving role of the building skin amidst emerging technologies, and the architects’ struggle to maintain sustainability while making the most of these radical innovations. As the theme of the conference changes with each season, a few familiar faces continue to return for more. Repeat attendees tell us that they keep coming back to Facades+ because it continues to bring the fresh perspectives, exciting case studies, and breakthrough ideas that allow them to push their professional practices forward. If you missed this one, don’t worry – we are already gearing up for the next electrifying installment of the Facades+ conference series, returning to New York City this April! And stay tuned, Dallas, because Facades+ will be breaking ground in your city next fall! Be prepared for more fascinating speakers, hands-on workshops, and more of the unparallel networking experience that you have come to expect from our signature events. For a taste of the action to come, check out the full Facades+ site for event photos, past lineups, and our stimulating Facades+ video series. See you in New York!
Placeholder Alt Text

Rojkind Arquitectos’ Mexican Treehouse

Francisco Saavedra fabricates a template to scale with large-format, Designjet printers from HP.

Founded in 2002, Rojkind Arquitectos is leaving an imprint across its native Mexico through a combination of civic, retail, residential, and hospitality projects. Its innovative design and production methods have garnered international recognition, particularly for projects like Nestlé's Chocolate Museum is in Toluca and innovation lab in Querétaro, and Mexico City’s Tori Tori Japanese restaurant, but the firm also engages in smaller projects and creative diversions that explore new avenues of the design/build process. Casa del Arbol is one such example. Conceived as an add-on for a venerable client, the project is a tree house for the family’s three young daughters. “There was a bird’s nest in the garden when we visited the site,” said Gerardo Salinas, partner at Rojkind. “And a 2-meter space between two trees in the yard was an ideal location that wouldn’t damage the existing trees.”
  • Fabricator Francisco Saavedra
  • Designers Rojkind Arquitectos
  • Location Mexico City
  • Date of Completion October 2013
  • Material Salam wood, wax, steel plates, screws, paper, MDF
  • Process Rhino, AutoCAD, SketchUp, HP Designjet printing, table saw cutting, screwing
The tree house is composed of three main cocoons in concentric circles making up a clover shape that provides a private play space for each girl. Working in Rhino, the architects emulated the geometry of a bird’s nest by magnifying the twig components into larger branches of wood. At one point, Salinas said the team considered Corian for the entire structure, but wood was a better logistical choice as LED lighting, power, and data were integrated into the design. Final Rhino files were converted to AutoCAD and sent to a large-format HP Designjet T920 printer. Templates were printed on paper in a 1:1 ratio, and used to cut the forms out of MDF. These hard templates were then laid over wood planks to fabricate the final ribs. The architects chose the wood of the Salam tree because it is certified to originate from a regulated forest, an assurance that Salinas said is not easy to find in Mexico. The timber variety also weathers well against the elements and is sealed with wax for added durability. To install Casa del Arbol, Salinas forewent the predictable wood-and-nail method. Steel plates attach to the ribs with stainless steel screws to prevent rotting. This self-securing method also gives the structure an appearance of floating within the trees and reduces direct impact. For privacy and comfort, panels of treated fabric will be secured to the vertical ribs.
Placeholder Alt Text

Chris O’Hara to Deliver Dynamic Facades at Facades+ PERFORMANCE

With only one month remaining before Facades+ PERFORMANCE opens in Chicago, our exciting lineup of the industry’s leading innovators is gearing up for an electrifying array of symposia, panels, and workshops. Be there for this groundbreaking, two-day convergence of design and construction professionals, presented by AN and Enclos, coming to Chicago, October 24-25th. Join Chris O’Hara, founding Principal of Boulder-based Studio NYL, for his day-one symposium, “Ludicrous Speed: the Design and Delivery of Non-traditional Facades on a Fast Track,” and learn first-hand from the experts the technologies and fabrication techniques that are revolutionizing the next generation of high performance facades. Register today to redefine performance for 21st century architecture, only at Facades+ PERFORMANCE. After graduating with a B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Notre Dame, Chris O’Hara began his career in New York with M.G. McLaren Consulting Engineers, where he was confronted with a host of unique structural engineering projects, from amusement park rides to New York’s Rose Center for Earth and Space at the American Museum of Natural History with Ennead Architects. Things really got going for O’Hara when he joined up with London-based Dewhurst Macfarlane Partners and began to work closely with visionary architect Rafael Viñoly. Leading high-profile projects like Viñoly’s David L. Lawrence Convention Center in Pittsburg and the Watson Institute for International Studies at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, O’Hara developed innovative structural solutions that allowed for the pioneering architect to exercise the breadth of his architectural expression. In 2004 O’Hara relocated to Boulder, Colorado to launch his structural engineering firm, Studio NYL, who have since become renowned for their diligent application of emerging technologies and inventive structural solutions. Their adventurous, detail-oriented work has drawn the attention progressive architects, both local and global, while O’Hara’s integration of multiple design software programs and use of complex geometries made him a literal poster-boy for Autodesk. In his daily practice, O’Hara oversees the use of BIM and other advanced analytic technologies and leads the design of innovative forms in BIM, REVIT, and direct-to-fabrication CAD/CAM softwares. Collaborating with fellow Facades+ presenters Rojkind Arquitectos, O’Hara has pushed the boundaries of structure and design on pioneering projects like the aluminum and glass enclosure of the Cineteca National and the digitally fabricated metal skin of Liverpool Flagship store in Mexico City. Designed and built in little over a year, the Liverpool Flagship store is a stunning product of international collaboration, technological instigation, and fast-paced delivery. Studio NYL lead the design for the structural elements of the atrium, rooftop park and pavilions, skylight, and stainless-steel facade for the 30,000 square meter shopping center. Using BIM software to coordinate the work of multiple trades on complex geometries, Studio NYL and Rojkind Arquitectos constructed the fluid folds and fine reliefs of the shopping center’s sound-blocking double-layer facade. Learn more about the secrets to delivering innovative, high-performance building envelopes on a tight schedule as O’Hara presents a series of dynamic new projects in his afternoon symposia, and don’t miss out as frequent-collaborator Gerardo Salinas, principal of Rojkind Arquitectos, presents his exciting keynote address earlier that day! Register now to cash in on our Early Bird Special, and check out the rest of the groundbreaking schedule of events at the full Facades+ PERFORMANCE site. See you in Chicago!
Placeholder Alt Text

Facades+ Headliners Usher in The Future of Performance

There's a lot to be excited about in the jam-packed schedule of intimate dialog and tech workshops on day two of AN and Enclos’ upcoming Facades+ PERFORMANCE conference. But don't forget about the exciting keynote-speakers headlining day one! Industry leaders Stefan Behnisch of Benisch Architekten and Gerardo Salinas of Rojkind Arquitectos will set the tone as they discuss the effects of emerging design, fabrication, and construction techniques on building facades in our current technological, environmental, and economic landscape. Leading innovators from across the AEC industry will be on-hand to redefine sustainable facade performance, so don’t miss this rare opportunity. Register now and mark it down on your calendar: Facades+ PERFORMANCE, October 24th-25th at the Illinois Institute of Technology’s Main Campus in Chicago. “For me, performance means going beyond the technical behavior of a facade or technical system to incorporate new-found relationships between technology, fabrication, and understanding the full potential and use of the local craftsmanship to obtain the desired results," Salinas told AN. "At Rojkind Arquitectos, we look at every project as a state of active awareness fueled by continuous research, cross-pollination and context sensitivity. Rather than focusing on 'all' we selectively choose a context and adapt our thinking to recognize opportunity under those parameters.” Before returning to his native Mexico in 2010 to become the first partner at Rojkind Arquitectos, Gerardo Salinas worked on several master planning and institution projects with Ellerbe Becket, acted as Senior Project Designer with HNTB and Senior Associate at Anderson Mason Dale Architects, and demonstrated his expertise and dedication to sustainable design as a member of the U.S. Green Building Council. In his keynote address, “The Economics of Fabrication,” Salinas will discuss how, by viewing the users' needs as sources of inspiration, his firm is able to construct designs that maximize potential while maintaining attainability. “The facade as a building’s skin is becoming a more and more complex element in architectural development,” said Stefan Benisch, founder and principal of Behnisch Architekten. “Considering that the number of trades and different materials within a building is decreasing, and the remaining, fewer trades will become more complex, the facade then needs to become a highly sophisticated, complex, integrated element, not unlike what the skin represents for the body.” In his keynote address, “Techinical and Architectural Expectations: The rapidly developing role of the building skin in the wake of new technologies,” Bensich will bring his decades’ worth of knowledge and experience to the Facades+ stage. Through his award winning work, like the Norddeutsche Landesbank in Hannover, Behnisch has infused dynamic, eye-catching design with forward-thinking sustainable technologies to create buildings that provide maximum benefit to their users, the public realm, and the natural environment. Join him on October 24 to see the projects that are paving the way for the next era of sustainable facade design and construction. Reserve your space now to hear more from these and other groundbreaking professionals on the future of high performance facades and the technologies that are revolutionizing our built environment, only at Facades+ PERFORMANCE
Placeholder Alt Text

Gerardo Salinas of Rojkind Arquitectos on Lineup at Facades+PERFORMANCE Chicago

AN is running full steam ahead to bring its Facades+PERFORMANCE conference series back to Chicago on October 24th and 25th. In an effort to offer the most stimulating presentations at the conference, the symposium afternoon keynote has been confirmed as Gerardo Salinas of Rojkind Arquitectos, a Mexico City-based firm. During the Day 1 Symposium, Salinas will discuss how his firm addresses users’ needs directly by viewing them as prospective sources of inspiration. As partner of Rojkind Arquitectos, Salinas has worked with the firm to discover new methods and opportunities in architectural practice. By investigating the uncultivated geometries that tackle issues of technology, materials, and structure in addition to other questions related directly to geography, climate, and local urban experiences, Salinas has demonstrated his expertise in the fast-paced evolution of facade technology. Salinas, upon receiving his undergraduate degree in architecture from the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico and his Master of Architecture from the University of Maryland, worked for Ellerbe Becket (now AECOM). After working on several master planning and institutional projects, Salinas became a Senior Project Designer with HNTB and then Senior Associate at Anderson Mason Dale Architects, Denver. In 2008, he was named Young Architect of the Year by AIA Denver. After 16 years in the U.S., Salinas returned to Mexico City in 2010 to join Michel Rojkind as partner of Rojkind Arquitectos. A member of the U.S. Green Building Council, Salinas demonstrates a knowledge and passion for sustainable design.
Placeholder Alt Text

Rojkind Arquitectos’ Tori-Tori Restaurant

Fabrikator Brought to you by:

A double-layer steel lattice transforms a former residence into a Japanese eatery’s new home in Mexico City

When Mexico City-based architect Michel Rojkind was chosen as one of the Architectural League’s Emerging Voices lecturers in 2010, he already had a lot of work under his belt. His firm, Rojkind Arquitectos, had recently completed Nestlé’s factory and chocolate museum in Querétaro and was beginning work on a 54-story mixed-use tower on Mexico City’s chic Paseo Reforma. But in spite of big-name projects, the architect who started out as a rock-and-roll drummer maintained a connection to the fabrication of his projects, collaborating with local workers and using simple components instead of employing more complicated techniques. “I joke with my Swiss architect friends that I wouldn’t know how to work in Switzerland, where everything is perfect,” he told AN in a May 2010 interview. “You have to figure out ways to make things happen here, and it inspires me.” A testament to that inspiration, Rojkind’s new Tori-Tori restaurant employs a double-layer steel lattice to transform an existing residential structure in Mexico City’s rapidly changing Polanco neighborhood.
  • Fabricators Rojkind Arquitectos, Esrawe Studio, Grupo Mas (facade engineering), Luz en Arquitectura (lighting)
  • Designers Rojkind Arquitectos, Esrawe Studio, Grupo Mas (facade engineering), Luz en Arquitectura (lighting)
  • Location Polanco, Mexico City
  • Status Complete
  • Materials Thin-gauge steel
  • Process Digital design, CNC cutting, field welding, hand finishing
Rojkind's firm worked with industrial designer Héctor Ersawe to plan the new 6,800-square-foot location for Tori-Tori, a popular Japanese eatery and one of many restaurants that moved or expanded into the recently rezoned Polanco area. Though some establishments have opted to simply hang out a shingle advertising their new presence, Rojkind's team wanted to create an entirely new environment that would tie the restaurant's interior to the outdoors. The new steel facade was digitally designed to mimic the vegetation that covers the project's retaining walls. Outside floor-to-ceiling glass, the grid structure wraps the south and west elevations of the restaurant. It extends from the ground to the roof in a pattern designed to give diners a view of outdoor patios while casting shadows on the interiors depending on the time of day. The facade's self-supporting layers are made with CNC-cut, thin-gauge steel plates that were welded in place on site and hand-finished by a team of nearly 40 local metalworkers. Slightly offsetting the layers and painting them two tones of gray add to the illusion of movement, and, lest diners forget they are not just enjoying a meal in a neighbor's lavish courtyard, blue LEDs positioned between interior and exterior layers add a touch of electricity to the air.