Posts tagged with "Robert Wilson":

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On View> Christian Wassmann’s “5 Platonic Objects” in New York City

Architect and designer Christian Wassmann explores the interaction between geometric forms and the space we inhabit in a new exhibit, 5 Platonic Objects, presented at R 20th Century Gallery. The show features five objects—such as a pillow or vase—that are inspired by each of the platonic solids: tetrahedron, hexahedron, octahedron, icosahedron, and dodecahedron. Wassermann, born in Switzerland, opened up his own practice in New York City in 2006. His works runs the gamut from furniture and installations to architecture and interiors, which has included Robert Wilson’s Byrd Hoffman Watermill Foundation, East Village Radio, and an apartment and private showroom for Lisson Gallery. The exhibition is on view March 5th through April 20th.
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MAS(sive) Support

In an extended period of belt-tightening, it is often the arts sector that grapples with some of the harder aspects of fund-raising. With heavy competition from other non-profits clamoring for support from the city’s enlightened wealthy, institutions must be creative and resourceful to attract new and more generous donors. For the Municipal Art Society (MAS), this dedicated support has come in the form of Robert W. Wilson. A veteran MAS donor, a philanthropist, and a former Wall Street hedge fund manager, Wilson has committed $600,000 over the next three years to match new or increased gifts of $1,000 or more on a one-for-two dollar basis. Effective August 1st, the aim is to help MAS strengthen and sustain its base of unrestricted support, which puts control of distribution into the hands of MAS rather than a targeted program. “Unrestricted support is the lifeline for any non-profit organization, and for MAS it’s fundamental to our core advocacy, planning and public program activities,” said MAS President Vin Cipolla in a recent interview. Indeed, MAS has been a keen advocate of preserving and protecting municipal artwork and buildings for almost 120 years. Set up by a group of architects, painters, sculptors, and civic leaders to create murals and monuments for New York’s public spaces, MAS later took on a more expanded interest in public debates about the design of the city’s buildings, parks, and monuments and its role grew to bring public consciousness to private developers and city officials. Among its most significant work is the transformation of Fresh Kills Landfill on Staten Island into a lively, usable park, for which MAS sponsored a competition won by James Corner Field Operations in 2001. Earlier successes include ensuring the protection of Times Square as an entertainment district against becoming subsumed into Midtown in the 1980s and pioneering the preservation of some of New York’s most important landmarks including Grand Central Station and Radio City Music Hall in the seventies. MAS’s “Adopt-a-Program” has seen numerous murals, statues, and buildings saved from erasure. With Wilson’s support—he has already provided most of the underwriting for the restoration of a mural by Ilya Bolotowsky on Roosevelt Island—MAS’s challenge now is to fuel another highly competitive field: giving.
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Helsinki Park By Robert Wilson To Pay Tribute to Tapio Wirkkala

The famed stage designer Robert Wilson is trying his hand at park design with a new commission in Helsinki dedicated to the memory of the designer Tapio Wirkkala, according to The Art Newspaper. The rectangular park--a garden, really--will be divided into nine rooms, each symbolizing different domestic spaces. One outdoor room, for example, will feature a small fireplace surrounded by stone seating.  Only in the Nordic countries would a designer known for his delicate and textured glassware for Iittala (see below) be honored with a public park. The park, which is expect to open next year, will be located in the Arabianranta district of Helsinki, home to the Iittala factory as well as the Aalto University School of Architecture and Design.
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Veni, Vici Furniture

Chef Mario Batali stopped by a group of diners at a press event today at Eataly to say that everyone who came into the new high-end Italian-theme eating court is ‘Italian.” But he was actually right, as sprinkled among the journalists sat the upper ranks of the Italian furniture industry all come to New York to announce one of those commercial-turned-cultural events that only the Italians can pull off without seeming crass. “I Saloni Milano in New York” wants to be for furniture what Fashion’s Night Out is for fashion. On November 29, some 20 Italian showrooms throughout New York will throw open their doors to “pay homage to the quality, innovation and beauty for which Italian design has long been known.” But that’s not the half of it. Programs in multiple venues will run for six weeks thereafter until January 8, 2011. Robert Wilson, master of theatrical event, will be at Center 548 in Chelsea to debut “Perchance to Dream: Videoportrait and Design Landscape,” a commissioned piece featuring ballet star Roberto Bolle. An ardent Italophile, Wilson is currently designing seven plastic chairs for Kartell, one for each decade of his life, and will also be selecting contemporary Italian-made furnishings to fill the gallery space as accompaniment to the videoportrait. When asked about his preferred style, he said, “I am interested in counterpoint. And you?” But that’s not all. Over at the Park Avenue Armory on December 3, artist-filmmaker Peter Greenway will be showing his multimedia spectacle of Leonardo da Vinci’s Last Supper that debuted in Milan in 2008. Here he will be upstaging himself with a replica of the dining set of the painting inside a full-scale mock-up of the nearly 4,000-square-foot apse and cupola of the Refectory of Santa Maria delle Grazie inside the drill hall. If that weren’t sweet enough, we hear that the panettone and caffe will be flowing everywhere throughout the holidays to inaugurate the 50th anniversary of the Milan Furniture Fair.