Posts tagged with "Rirkrit Tiravanija":

Current Work: Atelier Bow-Wow and Rirkrit Tiravanija

Current Work is a lecture series featuring leading figures in the worlds of architecture, urbanism, design, and art. Architects Momoyo Kaijima and Yoshiharu Tsukamoto of Atelier Bow-Wow and artist Rirkrit Tiravanija will discuss recent projects and share views on life, art, and architecture. Atelier Bow-Wow is a Tokyo-based firm founded in 1992 by Kaijima and Tsukamoto. Based on the concept of “architectural behaviorology,” the practice investigates the behavior of environmental elements—air, light, heat, wind, and water—as well as that of humans and buildings in order to optimize their performance. Recent projects include: Kaijima graduated from Japan Women’s University and completed postgraduate studies at Tokyo Institute of Technology. Tsukamoto studied architecture at the Tokyo Institute of Technology. Contemporary artist Rirkrit Tiravanija, who splits his time between New York, Berlin, and Chiang Mai, Thailand, is known for his “relational” artistic practice aligning social engagement as art. Recent works include: Tiravanija studied at the Ontario College of Art in Toronto, Banff Center School of Fine Arts, School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and Whitney Independent Studies Program in New York. The discussion will be followed by a reception and an opportunity to visit the exhibition Made in Tokyo: Architecture and Living, 1964/2020 at Japan Society (October 11, 2019–January 26, 2020), curated and designed by Atelier Bow-Wow.
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Johnston Marklee selected to design permanent home for Philadelphia Contemporary

The Philadelphia Contemporary, which up till now has been an itinerant “curatorial institution,” bridging art, performance, and spoken word with various pop-ups and events around its namesake city, is getting a permanent physical home by Los Angeles firm Johnston Marklee. The firm, whose partners Sharon Johnston and Mark Lee artistic directed the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial, have worked on a slew of cultural institutions as of late including the recent Menil Drawing Institute in Houston, which opens next week. Following on its nomadic beginnings, the new kunsthalle will be, as Lee puts it, “inextricably woven into the fabric of the city.” The Philadelphia Contemporary, sans building, has programmed cultural events across the city over the past two years, including an ASMR Film Festival, as part of its two week Festival for the People, an arts event that happened over the past two weekends and featured an impressive array of artists, performers, poets, and others from Philly and around the world, including Hito Steyerl, Andrea Bowers, and Lyrispect. The festival also featured selections from Creative Time’s Pledges of Allegiance, which is a series of 16 flags by a number of artists including Jayson Musson, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Tania Bruguera, and Rirkrit Tiravanija. Creative Time’s former chief curator, Nato Thompson, has been serving as the Philadelphia Contemporary’s artistic director.   Johnston Marklee was chosen after an extensive search by a 14-member jury comprising representatives from the Philadelphia Contemporary, as well as city officials, members of the arts, design, and literary community, and other local community members. Johnston Marklee will be working with local MGA Partners, the architect of record. The final building design is to be revealed in 2019.
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Video> Noguchi Museum Takes Civic Action

With buses running from the Lever House on Park Avenue, the Noguchi Museum was flush with Manhattanites last night for the opening of Civic Action: A Vision for Long Island City. The show of ideas by local artist teams—led by Natalie Jeremijenko, Mary Miss, Rirkrit Tiravanija and George Trakas—fleshes out urban dreams for the mostly industrial area. In anything but an autocratic manner, the show—the first ever at the museum to include contemporary artists and not Noguchi—encourages dialogue between large institutions, government, and the public. Columbia’s Gwendolyn Wright was on hand and praised the effort. “It’s not just an artist looking at infrastructure, but more of an exchange of information,” said Wright. “How do we see the gritty beauty of it, rather than ignore it.” To that end, George Trakas "River Shorline Walk" proposed lighting the Trans Canada power plant and building boardwalks in front of Con Edison substations. Mary Miss's red, black and white displays for "Ravenswoood/Call: If Only the City Could Speek" outline a think tank district where residents, engineers, artists, scientists and urbanists explore new ways of exchanging ideas about sustainable living. Rirkrit Tiravanija's "Greenway and Community Kitchen" envisions Broadway covered in drivable green grass with a community kitchen pavilion anchoring Socrates Park. (he said he just wanted to be able to have a coffee when he visits the park.) Natalie Jeremijenko shifts the show into high theory mode for "UP_2_U" exploring a "tasty biodiverse future" via "real-time 'smart city' technology" including among very many options a hulu hoop for seed dispersal. A good portion of the show is the locale itself. Getting to and from the museum resets the mind. LIC is nearly the size of all of lower Manhattan below 14th Street.  Art and industry have been meeting at the river there ever since Noguchi and Mark DiSuvero settled in about 50 years ago. Perhaps more than anywhere else in the city a collaborative effort between the two is not only possible but highly desirable. As AN reported a couple of weeks ago that conversation is still in the early stages. The show is part exhibit, part advocacy: consultant Claire Weisz has even taken parts of it to the Department of Transportation for feedback. But as Wright noted the show presses more for a dialogue, not a monologue. Grassroots activism remains key, but so does collaboration.  "Your voice will get hoarse from criticizing," said Wright. "But if a community does something in small specific ways, by creating moments for exchange, those moments become a catalyst."
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Artists to Redesign Biennale Facilities

The Venice biennale was founded in 1895 in one of La Serenissima’s few green spaces, the Giardini di Castello. It has occupied a random series of buildings in the park, which include national pavilions (the Belgians built the first in 1907 and the U.S. joined the party in 1930) and an undistinguished hall called the Italian pavilion since the late 1930s. Today the organization that operates the biennales (art, architecture, film etc.) announced plans to change the name of the Italian pavilion in the giardini to the Palazzo delle Esposizioni della Biennale and upgrade its aging infrastructure. While these changes will be welcome by the public, the spaces are all being designed by artists, not architects. The Italian pavilion will be enlarged with a new café designed by Tobias Rehberger, educational space by Massimo Bartolini, and a bookstore by Rirkrit Tiravanija. This pavilion will now be open to the public all year as the biennale’s archives will be moved into the building and entered through the elegant sculpture garden designed in 1952 by Venetian native Carlo Scarpa. The grand and spectacular biennale exhibition space the Arsenale, a short walk from the giardini will also receive a new bridge and entrance at the Giardini delle Vergini and its exhibition space enlarged from 800 to 1,800 square meters. The biennale organization stresses that the renderings of its new facilities are still tentative and may change and one may only wonder if they chose artists, rather than architects, to design their new facilities because of the confusion sowed by architects in the biennale who have long shown a preference to exhibit art not buildings.