Posts tagged with "Rios Clementi Hale":

Placeholder Alt Text

Santa Monica’s Third Street Promenade will undergo transformative master plan

Following a presentation made to the Santa Monica City Council on November 5, significant updates have been approved for the Third Street Promenade, a pedestrian-only shopping street that over the last three decades has become one of the city’s most popular tourist destinations. “Our predecessors were bold in 1989 and it’s time to be bold again as we reimagine the total experience of the Third Street Promenade,” said Santa Monica Mayor Gleam Davis in an official statement. “It’s time to reinvest in a community asset that has enriched lives and significantly contributed to Santa Monica’s prosperity." Known as “Promenade 3.0,” the master plan’s project team is comprised of local engineering firm KPFF and local architecture firms Rios Clementi Hale Studios and Gehl, which has worked together over the last year to develop three unique design concepts for the street: Improve, Adapt and Transform. ‘Improve’ would update the pedestrian experience by demolishing some of the site’s defunct retail pavilions to make room for pedestrian traffic while raising the roadway in certain sections; ‘Adapt’ calls for raising the entire roadway to curb level; and ‘Transform’ would remove and replace all existing flooring with updated materials, demolish retail pavilions, and add significantly more trees and other shading devices. All three plans include movable furniture, landscape areas and improved pedestrian crosswalks along the path’s two intersections. The City Council has expressed significant interest in Transform, the most ambitious redevelopment of the three proposals. In addition, the project team was encouraged by the Council to imagine even more transformative design gestures, which could serve to construct more zones for outdoor activities and increase opportunities for businesses operating lower-cost kiosks along the site. “Not only do we want to create an environment that gets people to come to the Promenade not just once but on repeated occasions … what’s important is that maintaining its authenticity will also make it more appealing to people,” said Mayor Davis. In its current arrangement, the Promenade covers three blocks of Third Street between Wilshire Boulevard and Broadway, culminating in a three-story open-air mall that recently replaced the Frank Gehry-designed Santa Monica Place Mall. “When the Third Street Promenade debuted thirty years ago,” said City Manager Rick Cole, “it revolutionized the way we look at public space in Southern California.” Only time will tell if Promenade 3.0 will meaningfully bring the original design’s revolutionary qualities into the 21st century. The project will be funded by Promenade property and city owners and is expected to cost between $45 and $60 million. Once ground is broken in 2023 or 2024, construction is anticipated to take one to two years.
Placeholder Alt Text

Rios Clementi Hale utilizes rolled steel and industrial detailing to activate historic ROW facades

facadeplus_logo1
Brought to you with support from

Bringing new life to the historic Los Angeles Terminal Market, Rios Clementi Hale (RCH) designed ROW DTLA to reinterpret the industrial nature of the Southern Pacific Railroad’s major produce hub. Reimagining the site where goods were once unloaded from railroad cars and delivered across Southern California, the team designed new storefront systems for ROW that embraced the site’s historic character through industrial materials and raw utilitarian details.

  • Facade Manufacturer StileLine U.S. Aluminum Corp. Sign Excellence CA Signs Signmakers Christopher Simmons Flux Vitro
  • Architect Rios Clementi Hale Studios House & Robertson Architects
  • Facade Installer BreakThru Glass Universal Ironworks Harris Glass Liberty Glass & Metal
  • Location Los Angeles, CA
  • Date of Completion 2017
  • Products StileLine Storefront Flush Front Storefront Vitro Solarban 70

Building upon the existing concrete storefronts throughout ROW’s 30-acre campus, the project transformed the long warehouse-style structures by using steel facade systems and street art. Each building featured different storefront and facade designs. RCH’s approach uses modern storefront systems that would support new pedestrian retail activity, but also feel at home within the historic industrial facades. The team utilized a palette of cut metals and neutral tones alongside artists’ murals, and storefront systems by facade manufacturers StileLine and U.S. Aluminum Corp.

In the Produce Buildings, the team specified aluminum storefronts with a wide-flange header and sill. To create strong indoor-outdoor connections in the office lobbies, the team designed a custom steel angle divided light system that is visually thin to allow visibility through it. For building two, RCH worked with House & Robertson Architects and StileLine to create steel storefronts with custom concrete sills. The approach is echoed in building three, where the custom sills are placed alongside refurbished original steel windows and aluminum storefront windows with a one-inch IGU. This also where Flush Front Storefront was used and Solarban 70 glass, specified for its transparent, color-neutral aesthetic and solar control. RCH creative director Sebastian Salvadó explained the restoration and facade systems used throughout the spaces, saying that, “For the Produce Building’s retail facades, we used crisp aluminum frames combined with steel wide flanges to add a level of detail along the more intimately scaled shopping street. In the industrial warehouse-style buildings, we used a rolled steel frame system. The tough, institutional quality, with its exposed screws and ability to span tall heights, worked well with the massive concrete warehouse buildings and their tall, first floor spaces.” The existing produce market, where L.A.’s bodegas have long sourced their fruits and vegetables, was left largely unchanged. At the southwest corner of the site, a cascading rooftop park was added to a new 10-story, 4,000-space parking garage. The greenery along its walls was designed to be emblematic of the landscape approach, which encourages nature to gradually encroach on the old industrial site. Together, ROW DTLA incorporate 100 years of Los Angeles history into a 21st-century commercial district that links Downtown L.A. to the burgeoning arts district. RCH creative director Sebastian Salvadó will present the ROW DTLA at Facades+ LA on November 14 as part of the "Adaptive Reuse and Context" panel.
Placeholder Alt Text

Woodbury launches Small Scale Architecture Store in time for the holidays

If you have some holiday shopping left to do, you're in luck. The Woodbury University School of Architecture in Los Angeles has launched a Small Scale Architecture Store just in time for the holidays. Located at the university's WUHO Gallery in Hollywood, the store features products and furniture pieces created by thought-provoking designers including Bureau Spectacular, DOT DOT DOT, Jenny Wu, New Affiliates, Ryan Tyler Martinez, ver|texx, and Yeh Studio. The store aims to "celebrate and sell the work of designers who push the boundaries of architecture and object, function and assembly, material and product, to produce indispensable objects to wear, utilize, adorn, carry, occupy, enlighten, and beautify" according to a press release. Included in the products that are up for sale are city-themed plates from NotNeutral, the product arm of RCH Studios, a faceted pendant light from DOT DOT DOT, fiberglass chairs from LA Forum and Modernica, and a Helicoid planter by Paul Anvar, among many others. Proceeds from the sales of the work will fund Woodbury University School of Architecture student scholarships. The store will run until December 23. See the WUHO Gallery website for more information.
Placeholder Alt Text

A+D Museum brings a “disgusting food museum” and others shows to L.A.

The Architecture + Design Museum (A+D) in Los Angeles is continuing a recent tradition of simultaneous exhibition openings this weekend as it hosts the third Assembly extravaganza with the aim of ”join[ing] together a diverse group in celebration of different disciplines of design and points of view.” Taking place Saturday evening, the opening celebration will usher in four new exhibitions at A+D, including a “disgusting food museum” as well as the premiere of the museum’s so-called “impermanent collection,” a rotating set of artworks and products created by exhibited artists that will be for sale. Disgusting Food Museum The museum will host the Disgusting Food Museum, an exhibition from Sweden that “explores of the concept of disgust through different culturally and individually informed reactions” and includes displays of delectable treats like mouse wine, Jello pudding, and other specialized foods. Alley Fellowship A+D recently undertook a partnership with architects Rios Clementi Hale Studios that is focused on supporting cross-disciplinary emerging artists through the Alley Fellowship. The first series is titled Volume, and features the work of young artists from the Leimert Park neighborhood—where RCH Studios’s new offices are located—who have been challenged to think three-dimensionally about their work. PERSISTENT: Evolving Architecture in a Changing World Presented in conjunction with the Open Building For Resilient Cities Conference, PERSISTENT: Evolving Architecture in a Changing World, focuses on the way in which “robust, sustainable, and resilient architecture can be obtained and studied with respect to time.” The exhibition is curated by Michelle Laboy, David Fannon, and Peter Wiederspahn with the support of the AIA Latrobe Prize and the Northeastern University, College of Arts, Media and Design. Dark Mode Artist and architect P810 will present an “eerie take on Dark Mode, which takes as its premise the visual digital standard of ‘dark mode’ becoming part of the home.” The design collection imagines new sculptural realities for typical objects of the home, according to a press release, including objects that come alive when they are switched off. For more information on each exhibit please visit the A+D website.
Placeholder Alt Text

Rios Clementi Hale choreographs a new park for Houston

Rios Clementi Hale Studios (RCHS) plans to transform Houston’s Jones Plaza from a sterile concrete jungle into a verdant, multi-functional space for locals and visitors to enjoy. The 1.5-acre design concept called “Urban Choreography” aims to embody the charm and appeal of Houston’s celebrated Theater District. With the growing number of workers, residents, and visitors to the area, there has been an increasing demand for pedestrian and transit-friendly environments with an abundance of green and open space. “Within Downtown, the Theater District and its many venues create a ‘magnetic field’ of culture that generates buzz and catalyzes investment in the surrounding neighborhoods,” RCHS said in a statement. “Jones Plaza, at the epicenter of the Theater District, can provide an inviting green oasis that enhances downtown life and it can flexibly accommodate a wide range of outdoor performances and special events that serve the entire region.” Inspired by the fluid, dramatic, and theatrical movements of the performing arts, the Urban Choreography design concept will connect Jones Plaza to its surrounding environment while creating a unique and artistic space for gathering. The vast plaza is reminiscent of a theatrical stage, where various steps and levels culminate to a plateau of lush green space. The expansive Street Theater, tree-filled Gateway Gardens, and dynamic Spring Stage, characterized by water cascading toward the street, can be found in three corners of the plaza. Each distinct space is connected by a proscenium walk, with multi-functional media towers that allow for various performances, activities, and special events. Meanwhile, a grand staircase and elevator connect the park to an upscale restaurant on Capitol Street. Perhaps the most substantial impact Jones Plaza can have on its surrounding environment is its ability to attract people to the heart of Houston's Theater District. Its presence will only heighten the cultural growth of a region known for its art, creativity, and diversity. RCHS will collaborate with Houston First Corporation, the City of Houston, and Theater District stakeholders on the project.
Placeholder Alt Text

Design, Bitches and more win 2018 AIA|LA Residential Architecture Awards

The American Institute of Architects Los Angeles chapter (AIA|LA) has announced its 2o18 Residential Architecture Award honorees. The 23 collected projects run the gamut from new, high-end mansions to affordable housing complexes and restored historic homes. With honors for Bestor ArchitectureGriffin Enright Architects, Rios Clementi Hale Studios, Design, Bitches, Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects, and others, AIA|LA has honored a who’s who of the region’s top design firms. See below for the full list of honorees and check out the AIA|LA website for more information and other awards programs. SINGLE-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL (up to 2,500 square feet) Merit Callow Residence, Altadena, CA, Corsini Stark Architects   Citation Saddle Peak Residence, Topanga, CA, Sant Architects Tilt-Shift House, Los Angeles, CA, ANX/Aaron Neubert Architects   SINGLE-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL (up to 5,000 square feet) Merit Callow Residence, Altadena, CA, Corsini Stark Architects Birch Residence, Los Angeles, CA, Griffin Enright Architects   Citation Venice House, Venice, CA, Rios Clementi Hale Studios Croft Residence, Los Angeles, CA, AUX Architecture, Brian Wickersham Y Chalet, Faraya, Lebanon, PARALX   Honor Waverley, Palo Alto, CA, Ehrlich Yanai Rhee Chaney Architects Bridge Residence, Los Angeles, CA, Belzberg Architects Brise Soleil, Beverly Hills, CA, Studio William Hefner Barrington Residence, Los Angeles, CA, Eric Rosen Architects   Multifamily Residential (up to 20 units) Citation Bluplex, Culver City, CA, Yu2e   Multifamily Residential (50 units and up) Citation Otis College of Art and Design Campus Expansion, Los Angeles, CA, Ehrlich | Fisher UCSB San Joaquin Housing, Santa Barbara, CA, Kevin Daly Architects UCSB San Joaquin Housing, Santa Barbara, CA, Lorcan O’ Herlihy Architects   Adaptive Reuse | Renovation | Historic Preservation Honor Mayumi, Culver City, CA, ShubinDonaldson Merit Harvey House, Palm Springs, CA, Marmol Radziner (original design: Buff & Hensman) Three Schindlers Redux, Inglewood, CA, Ehrlich Yanai Rhee Chaney Architects Silvertop, Los Angeles, CA, Bestor Architecture (original design: John Lautner)   Citation Garden House, Atwater Village, CA, Design, Bitches The Salkin House, Los Angeles, CA, Bestor Architecture Writer's Block, Arts District, Downtown Los Angeles, CA, CHACOL, Inc.   Affordable Housing  Merit Anchor Place, Long Beach, CA, The Architects Collective
Placeholder Alt Text

Los Angeles Design Festival to highlight city’s design chops this weekend

The Los Angeles Design Festival (LADF) returns to L.A. this weekend, offering up a wide-ranging slate of art- and design-focused events that aim to highlight the city’s growing design scene.  We’ve put together a few highlights for the weekend below. Though the festivities actually kicked off last night at the official opening party, things get serious today, with a bevy of installations and receptions opening to the public Friday and on through the weekend. Highlighting the day’s events will be a keynote address by Los Angeles Chief Design Officer and former Los Angeles Times architecture critic Christopher Hawthorne.  The keynote presentation will feature a discussion focused on housing in Los Angeles between Hawthorne, Barbara Bestor of Bestor Architecture, Julie Eizenberg of Koning Eizenberg Architects, and Jimenez Lai of Bureau Spectacular.  This evening, Antonio Pacheco, AN’s west editor, will be moderating a panel discussion at SPF:a Gallery titled “How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the L.A. River” that will focus on whether L.A. can avoid the dreaded “High Line Effect” as it revitalizes and restores the Los Angeles River. The discussion will feature panelists Deborah Weintraub, Chief Deputy City Engineer, and Chief Architect for the City of Los Angeles; Mia Lehrer, president and founder of Studio-MLA; Helen Leung, co-executive director, LA-Más; Mark Motonaga, partner at Rios Clementi Hale Studios; and Yuval Bar-Zemer, co-founder, managing partner at Linear City Development LLC. Saturday, the INTRO/LA modern furniture exhibition opens in the Row DTLA complex in Downtown Los Angeles. The annual exhibition will highlight the work of Another Human, Block Shop, Estudio Persona, Massproductions, and Waka Waka, among many others.  Saturday will also feature a special pop-up show featuring the work of L.A.-based offices Feral Office and Spatial Affairs. The exhibition will highlight the collaborative work of Berenika Boberska (Feral Office) and Peter Culley (Spatial Affairs) who have come together for a joint project titled “New Walled Cities and Hinterlands,” an exploration of Los Angeles’s particular urban forms as they relate to clustered densities and single-family neighborhoods.   Sunday will see another panel discussion—also at SPF:a Gallery—this one led by Steven Sharp, founder and editor-in-chief of Urbanize.LA, who will preside over a conversation titled “The Tech Frontier: The Rise of 'Silicon Beach'” that will address the socio-economic implications Silicon Beach could have over the long term as moneyed tech workers settle in Los Angeles. The panel will include Marc Huffman, vice president of planning & entitlements, Brookfield Residential; Michael Manville, assistant professor of urban planning at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs; Li Wen, design director and Principal at Gensler; and Russell Fortmeyer, associate principal for sustainability, ARUP. The last day of the festival will showcase a “a critical round-table discussion” called “The Morning After” covering the DOPIUM.LA [ D / M E N S / O N S ] exhibition and event at the A+D Museum taking place the night before. The discussion will feature contributions from curators, designers, and artists involved with DOPIUM.LA, as well as a conversation centered on the notion of temporality and impermanence in the production and exhibition of works of design and art, including how those efforts contribute to material reality. The afternoon will also feature a conversation between Andrew Holder and Benjamin Freyinger of the Los Angeles Design Group hosted by THIS X THAT, Hem, and Poketo. See the LADF website for more information and a full slate of calendar events.
Placeholder Alt Text

Plazas new and old are poised to reshape L.A.’s urban outdoors

When it comes to plazas and parks, Los Angeles–area landscape architects and designers have big plans for the future. The region is slowly warming up to the possibility of a more pedestrian-oriented urbanism, and, as a result, public spaces old and new are being imagined to suit that potential future. And while the region is adding plenty of new parks—the new Los Angeles State Historic Park, the ever-expanding Grand Park by Rios Clementi Hale Studios (RCH Studios), and the now-iconic Tongva Park by James Corner Field Operations come to mind—attention is now beginning to shift toward redefining the public plaza as it is practiced in L.A. One experiment comes from RCH Studio’s renovations to the Music Center plaza, originally designed by landscape architects Cornell, Bridgers, and Troller in association with Welton Becket and Associates in 1967. The stepped concrete plaza currently contains a Jacques Lipchitz–designed sculpture at its center, the art object surrounded by a maze of sunken courtyards, large planter boxes, and interactive fountains. RCH Studios plans to revamp the plaza to make the space more ADA-compliant while also bringing pedestrian energy from bustling Grand Avenue up into the plaza. The complex is on the same street as the Walt Disney Concert Hall and the Broad Museum and sits on axis with Grand Park and City Hall, relationships that the designers wanted to emphasize and perfect over the course of their renovations. Bob Hale, partner at RCH Studios, said, “Creating open space in L.A. is a very different thing than doing so in other places,” explaining that one of the goals of the renovations was to make the plaza hospitable enough to function as a “fifth venue” to complement the four existing concert halls and performance spaces on the site. The proposed 50,000-square-foot plaza—scheduled to reopen in 2019—will be completely flat, punctuated at its corners by pavilions containing a full-service restaurant, a cafe, a bar, permanent public restrooms, and a welcome kiosk. The project will also involve replacing existing—and over-pruned—ficus trees with new Agonis Flexuosa trees that will help create a more comfortable plaza as their canopies fill out. In Culver City, SWA Principal Gerdo Aquino and his team are working to create a new central square for the city on top of what was once a dusty parking lot. The firm’s Culver Steps project—created in partnership with EYRC architects and Hackman Capital Partners—is part of a podium-style development that will bring a new 55,000-square-foot stepped plaza with generously landscaped open spaces to the city’s core. The ascendant plaza will sit above a new underground parking garage and will share ground floor areas with a bevy of storefronts. A so-called “grand staircase” is to run up the slope, flanked by pockets of seating areas. The summit of the jaggedly stepped promenade will contain restaurants on one side and a four-story office structure on another. In all, the superblock- size project will unite a mix of squares and promenades served by the commercial and office spaces. “Many American cities are reimagining their city centers, sometimes in unconventional locations and ways,” Aquino explained. “The city and the major stakeholders have always considered the plaza as something that could be ‘out of the box’ and not tied down to any one precedent.” Landscaping for the plaza is inspired by the Sierra Nevada Mountains and will contain more conventional plantings along its lowest levels, with increasingly showy and diverse species of shade trees and evergreens up the steps and at the top of the structure. Ultimately, the steps will open in 2019 with the aim of creating a bustling and interactive plaza “filled with as many trees as possible.”
Placeholder Alt Text

L.A. County Supervisors approve Music Center Plaza renovation

L.A.’s Board of Supervisors has approved a $40 million plan by Rios Clementi Hale Studios (RCH) to renovate Music Center Plaza, a raised outdoor space in the heart of the city’s cultural complex. Similar to New York's Lincoln Center, the Music Center, designed by Welton Becket and Associates between 1964 and 1967, is a Modernist acropolis for the performing arts. The now-defunct landscape architecture firm Cornell, Bridgers and Troller designed the fountain-filled plaza itself, working together with Becket on a plan that would defer to the original buildings and serve as a central gathering space between the Music Center's three theaters. While it’s an iconic piece of the city’s development on Grand Avenue, the plaza hasn’t been renovated since it opened. RCH’s plans will ease access, increase capacity from 2,500 to 5,000 people, and add programming. The plans will widen and flatten the facility's main entry from Grand Avenue, add escalators from the street, and raise the plaza’s sunken portion. The Jacques Lipchitz–designed Peace on Earth sculpture, currently located in the center of the plaza’s fountain, will be moved west to allow for more continuous use of the space between the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, the Ahmanson Theater, and the Mark Taper Forum. Landscaped vistas will overlook Grand Park (also designed by the Los Angeles firm) on the eastern end of the plaza. "The Music Center was originally oriented toward Hope Street, but Grand Avenue is really its front door now. We needed to reflect that," said RCH Senior Associate Naseema Asif. Five new buildings on the site will include a restaurant, wine bar, coffee house, welcome center, and permanent restrooms. It remains to be seen how all this new development (and the raising of the plaza's recessed portions) will fit into the overall aesthetic of the Music Center, but Asif notes "they are all single story, simple massings with really tight material palettes that relate to the plaza." Funding for the project will include $30 million from the Board of Supervisors and $10 million from the Music Center, whic has raised $6.8 million for the renovation thus far. Becket, little-known outside of Los Angeles, designed many of the city's most important structures and complexes, including Capitol Records, The Beverly Hilton, the UCLA Campus Plan, the Century City Master Plan, and Parker Center, the former L.A. Police Headquarters that's now slated for destruction.
Placeholder Alt Text

Renderings revealed for 11-story, A+D Museum–adjacent L.A. office tower

Architects Gensler and Legendary Development have revealed renderings for a long-anticipated 11-story development on an existing L-shaped parking lot surrounding the A+D Museum in Downtown Los Angeles. The proposed tower will be located at 4th and Hewitt Streets in L.A.’s booming Arts District and will contain up to 255,000 square feet of office spaces, 15,000 square feet of ground floor retail uses, 11,000 square feet of common areas, and 538 parking stalls. The 8,950-square-foot A+D Museum is to remain, though it will shrink to 7,800 square feet, according to a preliminary Environmental Impact Report (EIR). Rios Clementi Hale is performing landscape architecture services for the project, Urbanize.LA reports. The renderings were first published by Curbed LA. The development, according to the renderings, is designed to approximate the Arts District’s industrial vernacular aesthetic and will feature four lower levels designed to look like surrounding late nineteenth century factory buildings. These levels come complete with divided light, factory-style windows and exposed concrete frame elements. The lower portion of the building will be topped by a seven-story glass curtain wall–clad building mass that is highlighted on various corners by bump-out volumes and inset balcony spaces. The complex will overlook the existing A+D Museum and will be accessed from a courtyard currently adjacent to the museum. The project comes as the areas around the A+D Museum and adjacent Southern California Institute of Architecture campus see an increase in office-containing projects. Several former industrial complexes—including an old Coca Cola syrup factory and a defunct Maxwell House Coffee roastery—are being adapted and expanded as developers work to meet growing demand for office space in the district. Other areas of the neighborhood are seeing a boom in residential and mixed-use development, as well. The Draft EIR indicates that the project team expects to break ground on the project in 2019, with completion scheduled for 2021.
Placeholder Alt Text

RCH Studios is selected to redevelop L.A.'s historic Lincoln Heights Jail

A team led by Rios Clementi Hale Studios (RCH Studios) and developers Lincoln Property Company and Fifteen Group has been recommended by the Los Angeles Chief Legislative Analyst to redevelop the Los Angeles River–adjacent Lincoln Heights Jail. The recommended scheme calls for repurposing the 90-year-old jail facility while also redeveloping an adjacent 3.2-acre parcel already controlled by Fifteen Group, Urbanize.la reports. The new scheme will be anchored around the Los Angeles River and the historic complex, utilizing the river frontage to create a broad promenade that stitches together new and historic buildings with the river. The plan incorporates new bicycle infrastructure and new street trees to connect and improve the surrounding blocks. Though project details are subject to change, the proposal currently calls for 268,250 square feet of residential spaces, 200,000 square feet of commercial uses, and 57,000 square feet of designated manufacturing and retail spaces. The project is slated to contain an unspecified amount of affordable housing. The RCH Studios–led development team was selected from among two other proposals—one led by CIM Group, Lorcan O'Herlihy Architects, LA Más, and Superjacent, and the other made up of WORKS, Mia Lehrer+Associates, Omgivning, and Killefer Flammang Architects. The teams were tasked with finding a productive and equitable approach for redeveloping the 229,000-square-foot art deco and modernist jail complex. The former jail was built in 1927, expanded in the 1950s, and finally decommissioned in 1965. The facilities were used variously thereafter until 2014. Plans call for adding three new structures on the eastern edge of the site to create new housing and a commercial strip, while redeveloping the former jail complex into a manufacturing-focused “makers hall.” The top three levels of the repurposed jail will contain residential functions as well. The project site would be anchored on one end of the riverwalk by a sports field, with a terraced amphitheater occupying the other extremity. The far eastern corner of the triangular site will host a nine-story commercial tower. The project is depicted in renderings as containing various roof gardens and planted areas, with the spaces between the existing and proposed buildings designed as pedestrian paseos. Interior renderings for the residential units in the repurposed jail depict exposed concrete beam ceilings and untreated concrete walls and columns. The project is scheduled for review and approval by the Los Angeles City Council on November 1st.
Placeholder Alt Text

L.A. picks three finalists for Lincoln Heights Jail redevelopment

The dilapidated and boarded-up Lincoln Heights Jail—a five-story, 229,000-square-foot art deco and modernist complex adjacent to the Los Angeles River—is on the verge of transformation as L.A. City Council officials prepare to implement redevelopment plans for the three-acre site. Sandwiched between Downtown Los Angeles and the city’s economically-stressed Eastside neighborhoods, the shuttered complex is one of the city’s most prominent historic landmarks. The triangular site sits in the city’s Cleantech Corridor and is written into the Cornfields Arroyo Seco specific plan as well. Those designations help poise the site for the type of high-end industrial redevelopment that is currently remaking the nearby Arts District while also threatening nearby communities with displacement. The jail was built in 1927 and was designed to hold 625 prisoners, though by the 1950s, it imprisoned more than 2,000 individuals, according to the Los Angeles Conservancy. Because of overcrowding, it was expanded in 1953 with a modernist wing. The jail has played an important role in the city’s history, holding individuals arrested during the Zoot Suit Riots of 1943 and the Watts Riots of 1965, for example. Individuals who had been arrested over suspicions regarding their sexual orientation were also imprisoned at the Lincoln Heights jail, which even contained a separate wing dedicated to incarcerating gay prisoners. The jail was decommissioned in 1965 and became vacant in 2014. Currently, developers CIM Group, WORKS, and Lincoln Property Company are each vying for the opportunity to remake the site. Developer CIM Group has proposed redeveloping the site as a mixed-use district called “The Linc” containing offices, housing—including multifamily and low-income units—retail shops, restaurants, and a community garden. The proposal calls for converting the art deco portion of the structure into a hotel with a rooftop restaurant. The 1953 addition would be converted to residential use while a triangular structure on the far end of the site will contain a single story of retail programming. CIM has partnered with architects LOHA, LA Más, and landscape architects Superjacent for the proposal. Nonprofit housing developer WORKS—Women Organizing Resources Knowledge and Service—is looking to re-envision the site as a community-driven enterprise called “Las Alturas.” The complex would include 122 housing units, including 66 permanent supportive housing and 47 moderate-income homes. The proposed complex would also include a community center, child care facilities, theater, and generously-landscaped areas designed by Mia Lehrer + Associates (MLA). Mia Lehrer, principal at MLA explained to The Architect’s Newspaper that the WORKS-led proposal represented “the kind of community-focused investor you imagine exists but you don’t get meet very often,” adding that the design team included partnerships with Cal Poly Pomona’s agriculture program, and architects Omgivning and Killefer Flammang Architects. A third proposal by Lincoln Property Company, Rios Clementi Hale Studios, and Fifteen Group is also on the table. That scheme—called the Lincoln Heights Makers District—calls for a commercial- and manufacturing-focused district containing four acres of open space. The plan includes 268,250 square feet of residential space, including an affordable housing component; 220,000 square feet of commercial space; and 57,000 square feet of manufacturing and retail spaces. The designers envision repurposing the existing jail facility as a manufacturing center with associated housing and commercial spaces located alongside.  The project has been proposed by the developer as part of a larger scheme that includes an adjacent, privately-owned 3.2-acre site that will contain live/work spaces. The proposal would include connections to the L.A. River as well as outdoor community-oriented leisure and work spaces.  The schemes are currently being vetted by the City's economic development committee before heading to the full City Council for consideration. The City Council is expected to decide on the proposals as soon as this fall.