Posts tagged with "Retail":

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John Ronan Architects designs Blu Dot's Chicago outpost

Minneapolis-based furniture company Blu Dot has recently opened its first Chicago outpost. The company—founded by two architects and a sculptor—sells clean-lined contemporary domestic furniture online and in nine stores across the U.S., Mexico, and Australia. To match its design sensibilities, Blu Dot tapped Chicago-based John Ronan Architects to overhaul a decidedly mundane strip mall space in the Lincoln Park neighborhood. To differentiate the 7,500-square-foot structure from the row of franchise fast food joints it is connected to, Ronan wrapped the building in a facade of thin vertical aluminum tubes. The effect is a mass separated from its immediate surroundings.

The interior is also set apart from the strip mall aesthetic. A polished clear resin on the concrete floor shows the history of past tenants, while clean white walls and a black-painted exposed utility ceiling let the furniture be the focus of the space. “The challenge was to utterly transform what had been a nondescript diner into something unique and memorable,” John Ronan explained. “And to employ an economy of means doing it. Our strategy was to bleach out the existing structure, create new openings and enlarge existing ones, and layer on a new identity.”

Blu Dot 1953 N. Clybourn Avenue, Chicago Tel: 872-315-3339 Architect: John Ronan Architects

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The Line opens seasonal store in Chicago’s Gold Coast neighborhood

New York–based lifestyle store The Line has opened a seasonal store in Chicago’s Gold Coast neighborhood. Located in the ground-level retail space of the Lucien Lagrange-designed Waldorf Astoria Chicago, The Line will be open through January 31, 2017. Like its permanent New York and Los Angeles stores, the Chicago iteration presents clothing, design items, and beauty products in a home-like space. As such, clothing is displayed in a bedroom setting, beauty products in a vanity, and general home goods in a living room space. The carefully displayed objects in the store come together as an ideal home. Along with the merchandise, the store also provides complimentary services, including interior design consulting. A series of special events will also be held throughout the holidays.

The Line – Chicago Waldorf Astoria Chicago 11 East Walton Street, Chicago Tel: 917-460-7195 Architect: The Line

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Bureau Spectacular–designed Frankie debuts in L.A. Arts District

Los Angeles–based Bureau Spectacular recently debuted a 2,000-square-foot flagship store for Frankie, a high-end fashion house. The shop, located in L.A.’s Arts District, is a spare box with polished floors and exposed brick walls framing what the firm calls a “super furniture” piece. The exterior is covered in black and white graphics that riff on the early 20th-century structure’s industrial detailing, with framed, jack-arched windows and various downspouts and roll-up doors along the facade painted with diagonal black bands—streaks of extreme shadow.

Inside, Bureau Spectacular designed an assembly of functional volumes that can be brought together into one 28-by-10-foot staircase. The firm’s founder Jimenez Lai considers the staircase to be the latest in the firm’s “super furniture” line of works, with the constituent components of the sculptural stair containing clothing racks, dressing rooms, storage bins, and display shelves. Lai described the work as an exploration of composition and part-to-whole relationships, with the interplay between those two aspects of the design being rather literal.

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2016 Best of Design Award for Interior > Retail/Hospitality: In Situ by Aidlin Darling Design

The Architect’s Newspaper (AN)’s inaugural 2013 Best of Design Awards featured six categories. Since then, it’s grown to 26 exciting categoriesAs in years past, jury members (Erik Verboon, Claire Weisz, Karen Stonely, Christopher Leong, Adrianne Weremchuk, and AN’s Matt Shaw) were picked for their expertise and high regard in the design community. They based their judgments on evidence of innovation, creative use of new technology, sustainability, strength of presentation, and, most importantly, great design. We want to thank everyone for their continued support and eagerness to submit their work to the Best of Design Awards. We are already looking forward to growing next year’s coverage for you. 2016 Best of Design Award for Interior > Retail/Hospitality: In Situ Architect: Aidlin Darling Design Location: San Francisco, CA

Inhabiting a street-front space in the Mario Botta–designed portion of the newly reopened SFMOMA, In Situ stands at the intersection of art, design, food, and community. In support of chef Corey Lee’s vision, the design celebrates visibility, accessibility, comfort, and openness by foregrounding the guest’s physical experience. Emphasizing tactility and acoustics, the space juxtaposes the rough with the refined, leaving the interior shell of the building relatively raw and exposed while contrasting it with custom lighting, furniture, commissioned art, and a sculptural wood ceiling.

Branding, Graphics & Environmental Graphics a l m project

Lighting Consultant JS Nolan & Associates Lighting Design General Contractor Plant Construction Wood Supplier and Custom Lounge Table Fabricator Arborica Custom Pendant Lighting Boyd Lighting

Honorable Mention, Interior > Retail/Hospitality: Voyager Espresso

Architect: Only If— Location: New York, NY

Located in Manhattan’s Fulton Street subway station, Voyager Espresso eschews the typical artisanal aesthetic of contemporary coffee culture for a more futuristic design and material palette, reflecting the client’s scientific approach to coffee.

Honorable Mention, Interior > Retail/Hospitality: TurnStyle

Architect: Architecture Outfit Location: New York, NY

In transforming a neglected block-long passageway within the New York City subway system into a vibrant public space for shopping, eating, and gathering, TurnStyle serves as an inspired model for future transit retail in the city.

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Foster-designed Apple store proposed for historic Carnegie Library in D.C.

The Carnegie Library at Mount Vernon Square, a historic building next to Washington’s Convention Center, is likely to become the home of a flagship Apple store designed by Foster + Partners of London. Events D.C., the convention and sports authority for the District of Columbia, last week entered into a letter of intent with Apple to lease portions of the 63,000-square-foot library, which is under its jurisdiction. If negotiations are successful, the development will reimagine the historic site for the 21st century, while remaining consistent with its original purpose. The plan calls for the tech giant to renovate the 1903 library at 801 K. Street N. W. and pay market-rate rent to operate a store designed by Foster + Partners, which was founded by Norman Foster and also designed Apple stores in San Francisco and London. “This is an extremely important repositioning of an iconic building—a building whose original purpose was about community, information and sharing of knowledge,” said Max Brown, chairman of the board of Events DC. "Amid rapid change in our city, we are confident the space can become a true blend of the square’s past and future.” “We are excited that Apple is interested in joining our growing tech ecosystem,” said Washington Mayor Muriel Bowser. “The store’s proposed location… will link D.C.’s rich history to our continued economic renaissance, will demonstrate the strength of our retail market, and will tell companies across the globe that the District is open for business.” According to Events DC, the proposed arrangement calls for Apple to lease portions of the library’s ground floor and basement levels under a 10-year lease, with two five-year options to renew. Events DC will have certain rights to use non-retail areas of the library for special events, and Apple will “co-locate” in the library with its existing tenant, The Historical Society of Washington. “A partnership with Apple would be a tremendous opportunity for Events DC, for the Historical Society, and for the District,” said Gregory A. O’Dell, president and chief executive officer of Events DC. “Not only can this new partnership cement the Shaw neighborhood as a convention and entertainment district in the city, but it can also drive economic impact with substantial revenue opportunities. Designed by Ackerman & Ross in the Beaux Arts style, the Carnegie Library was one of thousands of libraries funded by steel industry titan Andrew Carnegie, and it was the first fully-integrated public building in Washington, D.C. In 1999, Congress granted $2 million and a 99-year lease to the historical society to use the building as a history museum about Washington, D.C. After $20 million worth of renovations funded by local donors, the library has served as the home of the historical society’s exhibits, public programs, and renowned Kiplinger Research Library since 2003. The area around the library has seen rapid growth in recent years, with the opening of the Marriott Marquis Washington and a series of new restaurants, stores and housing developments. In 2014, Carnegie Library was considered as a new home for the International Spy Museum, which had outgrown its current location at 800 F. Street N. W. But the museum and its architect, MGA Partners, wanted to build additions to the existing structure and their plan was turned down by historic preservationists. Now that Events D. C. has shown support for Apple’s project, plans still must be approved by the National Capital Planning Commission and Washington’s Historic Preservation Review Board before construction can begin. It would be the second Apple store in Washington, after one in Georgetown.
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Motorcyle manufacturer Royal Enfield opens first U.S. store in Milwaukee

Milwaukee may be known for its Harley-Davidson Motorcycles, but there is a new ride in town. Royal Enfield, a division of India-based Eicher Motors Ltd., has just opened its first company-owned U.S. dealership and North American headquarters in Milwaukee’s Third Ward district. The new space is meant to be part of a greater push to move the 115-year-old motorcycle company into the U.S. market. Local management worked with Milwaukee-based Ener-Con developers, who own the building, to lay out the space for both sales and office.

The new store and headquarters in located on the first floor of the historic four-story Mitchell Leather building. The building is distinctly Milwaukee and is constructed out of the light-colored Cream City bricks that were once manufactured in the city. These bricks are featured in the showroom by way of exposed walls and a simple material palette for the space. A polished concrete floor gives the feel of a clean garage filled with the classically designed Royal Enfield motorcycles. Motorcycle parts are both for sale and used to adorn the space, including a striking chandelier made out of Royal Enfield headlights.

Royal Enfield North America 226 North Water Street Milwaukee, WI Tel: 414-502-1204 Architect: Ener-Con

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Chicago’s first Aesop store uses ten thousand reclaimed bricks

Chicago and New York–based firm Norman Kelley recently finished Chicago’s first Aesop store. The high-end Australian skin care company frequently hires young architecture firms to design their stores, and Norman Kelley’s iteration takes its cues from the surrounding historic Bucktown neighborhood.

Consisting of ten thousand reclaimed Chicago common bricks, the floor and walls are clad in intricately woven herringbone and pinwheel brick bond patterns. In order to hold the weight of the all-brick interior, the floor of the structure was reinforced from the basement. An unused chimney was removed to create a completely open floorplan. In the center of the space, a black-stained white oak counter and a demonstration island are the only furniture in the space, keeping the focus on the black steel-clad shelves, embedded in the brick walls, holding Aesop’s famed soaps and lotions.

Norman Kelley has also recently finished a second Aesop store in Tribeca, New York.

1653 North Damen Avenue Chicago, IL Tel: 872-802-4626

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NBA Store offers portal into world wide web of basketball culture

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Brought to you with support from DEK-16023_Dekton_Facades_AN_234X60
      The NBA Store, occupying a 25,000-square-foot corner storefront on Fifth Avenue at 45th Street, offers an immersive shopping experience for NBA fans. The store, designed by Gensler in conjunction with Kurt Salmon and TAD Associates, is a multidimensional design effort that merges basketball memorabilia with technology to produce unique interactive experiences. Three floors of jerseys, hoodies, and hats, along with other official memorabilia spanning NBA, WNBA, and NBA D-League teams, are showcased to the public with a double height glass and aluminum facade. Set in the circular corner bay of the storefront, 31,000 LED lights form a two-story tall skewed grid that evokes the form of a basketball net. The 32-foot tall structure is capped by a sculpture designed to replicate a basketball tread—presumably on its way to “swooshing” through the LED net.
  • Facade Manufacturer Pure + Freeform
  • Architects Gensler
  • Facade Installer MBM Metal Works
  • Facade Consultants Studio NYL
  • Location New York City
  • Date of Completion anticipated completion date November, 2016
  • System curtainwall with 3mm aluminum plate trim, eyebrow and cured portal, interior wall
  • Products 3mm aluminum with bespoke 8 unit finish, lumiflon coating
Surfaces with hardwood floor patterning derived from the league’s recognizable maple wood courts extend outward beyond the glass facade to form portals and awnings. The aluminum panels are a product of Pure + Freeform, a bespoke metal company that according to Operations Director Will Pilkington, operates as “contextual, site-specific designers." Gensler, interested in the idea of bringing a durable “hardwood court” aesthetic to the exterior facade, initially approached the company. The process began with sending a sample of Madison Square Garden’s court which was sent to Pure + Freeform’s design team, which digitally copied the material properties of the court and created multiple diamond and laser engraved steel “design cylinders” capturing aesthetic qualities of the classic hardwood court. The cylinders etch into a one-eighth-inch aluminum plate through a controlled process of adding pearlized inks and resin. The plates are then baked to seal in the print. This exterior lumiflon resin technology process highlights Pure + Freeform’s “solutions-based manufacturing style” which involves production lines that add up to a 1/4 mile in length. "The best thing about our process is we can create purposeful, site-specific finishes, but then they can be formed in almost any way to emphasize their depth and character," explained Pilkington. The technology allows for a wide range of coloration, design, texture, and glossiness, allowing the design team to accurately produce a staggering array of material effects from natural stone and wood finishes to a variety of metallic, abstract, and bespoke finishes. Additionally, the printed resin fabrication process allows for the metal surface to be post-formed in a variety of challenging bent and folded configurations that typical painted surfaces would not hold up to. The NBA Store utilizes these abilities through a radiused concealed fastener application, forming the inner lining to the NBA’s trademarked logo, massively scaled up to the double height facade elevation. The material was used for interior wall paneling as well. Beyond the facade, over-scale elements play a key role in the design, evoking the larger-than-life feeling fans may have when finding themselves standing next to basketball’s greatest players. A 40-foot footwear wall made from an undulating nylon “shoelace”, a Spalding basketball chandelier featuring 68 game balls, and a wall of 2,500 hats covering every team are among the store’s most architectural features. Departments are designed to produce basketball-specific environments. A children’s section doubles as a locker room, while video screens saturate the main floors arena-like vibe with a 400-square-foot video wall broadcasting highlights, news, and social media posts to keep fans up to date. Personalization areas highlight a retail strategy that seeks to extend beyond the limits of a physical store, tapping into a vast number of online products, social media conversations, and customizable NBA merchandise. “It makes a 15,000-square-foot store like a 100,000-square-foot warehouse,” said Ross Tannenbaum, president of memorabilia and in-venue divisions for Fanatics, which is operating the store. In this sense, the retail store acts as a virtual portal of sorts, offering fans a virtual experience when entering the physical space.
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Rafael de Cárdenas designs vibrant department store interior in St. Petersburg, Russia

Within an historic art nouveau building in St. Petersburg, Russia, Rafael de Cárdenas and his New York–based firm Architecture at Large have designed a vibrant and modern interior for the third floor of the Au Pont Rouge department store. The eight-story, 30,000 square foot building, designed by architects Vladimir Lipskii and Konstantin de Rochefort, was constructed between 1906 and 1907. Early in its extensive history, the building was home to a department store rumored to boast the Romanov family as customers. The design for the third floor does not represent the historic character of the building, said de Cárdenas in an interview with AN. However, a variety of unique colors, textures, and layouts combine to create a distinct shopping experience. The project's overall spatial arrangement differs from the traditional perimeter layout for department stores. In a perimeter layout, stalls are arranged in a track tracing the perimeter of the store. In this retail space, however, stalls and changing areas are located along the linear spine of the floor. Public spaces, circular in shape, also make up the spine and host designer pop-ups, activities, and services areas. de Cárdenas noted that the varying ceiling heights helped to distinguish the open zones that comprise the spine from more intimate ones that flank the spine. These more intimate areas have lower ceiling heights and are separated green glass walls layered with expanded metal mesh. Lighting, in tandem with the colors, also alludes to the contrasting qualities of these spaces. On the window-facing side of the spine, the ceilings feature green, anodized aluminum fins. This detail “[captures] the light in a more interesting way,” said de Cárdenas. On the atrium side of the spine, the ceilings are simpler, flat, green surfaces with recesses for lighting . As the day progresses, the glow from the lights “casts a soft gleam over everything.” The fourth floor of the store, also designed by Rafael de Cárdenas and Architecture at Large, is not yet complete but de Cárdenas did note that the two floors are cohesive.
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Glass cube of retail and offices will sit next to Viñoly-designed supertall 432 Park

New York-based real estate investor Harry Macklowe, behind the Bohlin Cywinski Jackson-designed Fifth Avenue glass cube Apple Store, is working on bringing another cube to Manhattan, this time on Park Avenue. “On Tuesday, Macklowe Properties unveiled renderings for what it calls a ‘Park Avenue Cube’—a low-rise retail building adjacent (and connected) to its luxury condominium tower,” The Real Deal reports. The cube was designed by Rafael Viñoly Architects. “Together, the cube and tower will hold 130,000 square feet of retail and office space.” The cube is sited for 432 Park Avenue—also designed by Rafael Viñoly Architects—and will host two floors of retail space totaling 6,600 square feet and a Zion and Breech-designed marble plaza featuring birches. The cube will connect to the supertall condo tower via a below-ground 30,000 square-foot concourse. 432 Park Avenue, which opened at the end of 2015, is currently the tallest residence in New York City, topping out at 1,396 feet. The property was previously the site of the 1926 Drake Hotel which once accommodated celebrities (Judy Garland, Muhammad Ali, among others) and musicians and bands (Jimi Hendrix, Led Zeppelin, The Who, Frank Sinatra). Macklowe bought the property and hotel in 2006, and demolished the hotel in 2007. 432 Park Avenue will also feature 17,600 square feet of office space above 20,000 square feet of retail.  “There are only two markets, ultraluxury and subsidized housing,” Rafael Viñoly told The New York Times in May 2013, at the start of 432 Park construction. At the time, the first ten floors were finished, with 78 left to go.
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Goettsch and Lead 8 win competition for massive Shanghai complex

Designs by Chicago-based Goettsch Partners, along with Hong Kong-based Lead 8, have been chosen for a 2,841,672-square-foot, mixed-use complex in Shanghai. The Financial Street Shanghai Railway Station Mixed-Use Development is spread across two parcels of land just north of the Shanghai Rail Station. The project provides pedestrian routes connecting the project to adjacent sites and public transportation hubs with above and below grade paths and bridges. David Buffonge, cofounder and executive director of Lead 8 explained that “Financial Street Shanghai creates a sustainable urban environment that will concentrate walkable, compact densities around a vibrant mixed-use site near Shanghai Railway Station.” On the eastern parcel of the project, a 161,459-square-foot office building is accompanied by 484,375 square feet of loft apartments, and 161,458 square feet of retail space. The western parcel includes 1,410,072 square feet of office space, another 581,251 square feet of retail,236,806 square feet of loft apartment space, and a 53,819-square-foot cultural center. These programs are spread through five main buildings surrounded by shared public spaces and green retail streets. The office buildings also connect with the outdoors with indoor-outdoor work spaces, specifically tailored to appeal to technology and start-up companies. Both Goettsch and Lead 8 worked on the master plan for the project. Goettsch is leading the design on all the office and residential portions of the western parcel and the exterior design of the eastern parcel, while Lead 8 is handling all of the retail portions. Lead 8 is a young office founded in 2014. Their name, a partial acronym, stands for living environments, architecture and design. With offices in Hong Kong, Singapore and Kuala Lumpur, they focus on large-scale, mixed-use, and transit-oriented developments.        
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Rafael de Cárdenas on the facade as an opportunity for identity and seduction

The 2800 sq. ft. flagship store opened ahead of Baccarat's 250 year anniversary.

Architecture at Large, a multi-disciplinary practice working within the architecture, interior, art, and branding fields, recently transformed a blackstone Madison Avenue facade into a flagship store for Baccarat, a French manufacturer of fine crystal renowned for their craftsmanship and innovative designs. The facade draws inspiration from said craftsmanship of the 250-year-old brand. Composed of three-layers of custom frit glass, a large-scale, faceted pattern abstracts the cutting of crystal glass into a super scale pattern.  "One of the most difficult techniques in the cutting of crystal is the diamond cut," says Rafael de Cárdenas, founder of AAL,  "and one of the key attributes that sets Baccarat apart from their competition is the level of intricacy to their cuts." Through various densities of fritting applied to the three layers, ranging in density from 25-75%, a dynamic shifting image is created for passersby and visitors to the building. The Baccarat facade affords limited views of the interior walls, lined with a disorienting blend of dark Macassar ebony wood interspersed with mirrored strips folded into a zig-zagged, corrugated surface. These walls—along with a large centralized chandelier hanging over the entryway—reflect daylight in the space. Cardenas says the sharpness of this feature wall was inspired by the brand itself. “We liked the idea of creating a mystery - of obscuring the interior to create a sense of seduction.” Specific portals utilizing clear glass were framed out on the ground level to establish storefront display zones, and selectively above to reveal the chandelier from the exterior.
  • Facade Manufacturer Pilkington Planar by W&W Glass, LLC
  • Architects Architecture at Large (design architect), Gensler (project architect)
  • Facade Installer W&W Glass
  • Facade Consultants W&W Glass, EBM Engineering (structural engineering)
  • Location New York, NY
  • Date of Completion 2013
  • System point supported structural glass system with custom ceramic fritting
  • Products Pilkington Planar
The retail project was composed of a notably significant project team, pairing two architecture firms with a code consultant, structural engineer, and project manager. The team ultimately influenced the identity of the facade through performative analysis. Fritting pattern densities were adjusted, and ultimately increased during the design process to promote greater heat retention within the interior space, helping to reduce HVAC loads on the building. The existing floor plates of the building were modified to create a large, two-story entrance to the store, resulting in a significantly altered facade opening, infilled with a two-story glass storefront. Through custom frit patterns and layering of material, Cárdenas’ team was able to produce an architectural effect that behaves like crystal itself. “The tradition of having a very holistic identity that has a street presence was definitely honed in Asia,” says Cárdenas, who cites Shiro Kuramata's work with Issey Miyake in the late 1970's as triggering a particularly dynamic retail design culture. "In Asia, all of the brands have their own buildings. Here in New York, on Madison Avenue, the architecture already exists. The facade has no relationship to the interior. With this being said, we were able to create a very strong identity using only glass."