Posts tagged with "Retail":

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OMA’s completed Galleria department store in South Korea certainly stands out

Rotterdam-based Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA) has completed the newest outpost for upscale South Korean department store chain Galleria, in the fast-growing planned city of Gwanggyo. The Gwanggyo location, just south of Seoul, is the sixth and largest store overall for the venerable, nearly 50-year-old luxury retailer, and its first new location in a decade. Although other Galleria stores are distinctive from a design standpoint, this one takes the proverbial cake. Set against a backdrop of residential high-rises, the building takes the form of a monolithic slab of granite with a pixilated mosaic facade that’s meant to “evoke the nature of” the neighboring Suwon Gwanggyo Lake Park, per OMA. Protruding prism-like from the hulking structure is a meandering, multifaceted glass passageway, complete with a “series of cascading terraces,” that wraps itself around the entirety of the eight-story building twice. Beginning on the ground floor and concluding at an outdoor rooftop garden, the circuitous corridor serves as a public route where well-heeled shoppers—and also the general public—can pause and take in arts- and leisure-minded activities including exhibitions and live performances. “With a public loop deliberately designed for cultural offerings, Galleria in Gwanggyo is a place where visitors engage with architecture and culture as they shop,” said OMA partner Chris van Duijn in a statement. “They leave with a unique retail experience blended with pleasant surprises after each visit.” At first glance, this wildly idiosyncratic department store resembles a glistening, Paul Bunyan-sized mineral stone. Some critics, however, are reminded of other things: In total, the rubberneck-inducing department store, which OMA envisioned as a “a natural point of gravity for public life in Gwanggyo,” encompasses roughly 1.6 million square feet including a sizable, multi-level subterranean space complete with a market hall. The building’s upper floors are home to a movie theater, lounges, restaurants, and other amenities. According to the English-language daily The Korea Times, the Gwanggyo branch of Galleria was slated to open to the public in late February but was delayed to concerns over the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. Galleria, which is akin to Neiman Marcus or Nordstrom but perhaps a touch ritzier at some locations, is owned by South Korean mega-conglomerate Hanwha.
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Jorge Penadés constructs a colorful matrix for shoewear brand Camper

Since debuting his upcycled leather composite Structural Skin furniture line in 2013, Spanish designer Jorge Penadés has made waves on the international design scene. Whether creating a chair by strapping in sheets of glass together or curating the speculative Extraperlo exhibit during each annual Madrid Design Week, the up-and-comer always finds smart ways to interpret complex concepts. His approach is both structurally inventive and deeply referential, especially when it comes to the physical and semiotic translation of industrial materials. Experimental talents don’t always manage to anchor their postulations with visual impact. Penadés' intuitive understanding of color, form, and texture ensures that even his most convoluted projects can gain the attention of a broad audience. For his first-ever interiors project, Penadés was commissioned by Spanish shoewear brand Camper to outfit their latest outpost in Málaga. The designer was given carte blanche and opted for a simple yet impactful concept that evokes a warehouse but also a number of children’s construction toys. He referenced the brand’s recently refurbished depot that contains an archive of novel items, such as design pieces by greats like Michele De Lucchi, Gaetano Pesce, Ingo Maurer, the Bouroullec brothers, and Konstantin Grcic. Read the full breakdown on our interiors and design website, aninteriormag.com.
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Montreal’s Studio Kiff dedicates an altar to skateboard label Dime

Young Montreal-based practice Studio Kiff (led by Hélène Thiffault and Rachel Bussin) defines its aesthetic as nonconformist and responsive. Pulling references from a wide variety of sources, such as 1990s normcore and 1970s radical design, the AN Interior 2019 Emerging Designer studio approaches each new project with a tabula rasa mindset that balances decorative and practical elements. Deeply embedded in the Canadian city’s burgeoning creative scene, Studio Kiff’s clients are fellow entrepreneurs looking to make their mark in a saturated fashion and design world. Young skateboard and fashion accessories brand Dime is no different. The popular streetwear label called on Studio Kiff to outfit its first brick-and-mortar space. The compact store, which is Bussin and Thiffault’s second interior design project, centers around a stepped, granite podium. This “altar” is adorned with shoe-ware, ceremonial vases, and a personalized bowling ball—items that reference the brand’s meteoric rise. An intentionally kitsch painting of an erupting volcano hangs above this mise-en-scène. Read the full preview on our interiors and design website, aninteriormag.com.
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David Adjaye creates a curvilinear cave for The Webster’s L.A. outpost

For his first-ever project in California, David Adjaye has transformed a sleepy yet well-positioned Beverly Hills storefront into a dazzling fashion flagship and adjoining public space. Set to open on February 7, The Webster's latest outpost is cast in pink-hued concrete that flows within a matrix of curved walls and massed display plinths. These columnar, tear-drop-shaped, and even rectilinear podiums help anchor and break up this homogenous interior. While a few of these platforms slope out of convex voids, others appear to float over the store’s black cherry and marble fragment floor. Visible on closer inception, a variety of textures and finishes help distinguish different architectural elements throughout the space. Recessed lighting delineates the project’s complex geometry while bronze-framed mirrors and display racks line its perimeter. However consistent with the store’s monochromatic palette, unexpected floral wallpaper designs, sourced from the 1950s, cover the upper half of fitting room walls. Read the full article on our interiors and design website, aninteriormag.com.
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Gallery Gabriel & Guillaume takes on New York in grand style

Untethered to a fixed brick and mortar space in one city or another, a nomadic gallery has the advantage of setting up (temporary) shop in some of the most emblematic locales. Whether their wears feature prominently at an exhaustive list of fairs, in storied buildings, or in recently completed real estate projects, this type of platform often enters into and benefits from, win-win situations. These purveyors sell better when showcasing their collections in aptly-decorated contexts while the proprietors of these sumptuous settings can promote their venues more holistically. For the arbiters of historic palaces and stately homes, this type of program represents the chance to recontextualize and, in turn, shed new light on often forgotten sites. For developers of new residential projects, this type of arrangement puts a spin on the timeworn practice of open houses and helps their real estate agents sell more units. Brightening up a dreary, albeit warm, New York January is a special exhibition mounted by Beirut and Paris-based collectible design gallery Gabriel & Guillaume. Staged in the penthouse of the SHoP Architects and Studio Sofield-restored 111 West 57th Street building in Midtown Manhattan, the L'Œi'l du Collectionneur showcase brings together an eclectic array of historical and contemporary furnishings, presented in various domestic vignettes. The atypical initiative was conceived by marketing agency frenchCALIFORNIA, in partnership with JDS Development Group, Property Markets Group, and Spruce Capital Partners. Read the full article on our interiors and design website, aninteriormag.com.
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Gen Y-favorite Name Glo puts down roots in New York

Made famous by its collaborations with Google, Lexus, Net-A-Porter, Netflix, Revlon, and Saks Fifth Avenue—to name (but) a few—cutting edge neon company Name Glo takes the design world by storm again and again. Founded in 2014 by Sas Simon and Lena Imamura, the boutique brand opened its first brick and mortar space earlier last week. Situated in Manhattan's edgy Lower East Side neighborhood, the new, compact Name Glo Light Bar is a sight to behold. Cast in a floor to ceiling "teal oasis" hue, the flagship's non-nonsense design is best suited to present neon signage and lighting. The locale incorporates both showroom and production facilitates. Customers can design their own neon masterpiece by mixing and matching shapes, plexiglass elements, and handmade terrazzo-like tiles. A virtual projection allows them to test out the scale of their compositions. Read the full article on our interiors and design website, aninteriormag.com.
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Luxury purveyor TRNK opens its own Soho loft

Renowned lifestyle brand TRNK has opened its first brick and mortar space, a distinguished 1300-square-foot loft, smack dab in the center of New York City's storied SoHo neighborhood. With the historic Judd Foundation next-door, this intimate live-in showroom features an enfilade of richly-textured yet sober living environments. Dramatically light-cast alcove-displays can be found toward the rear. Pieces from the in-house-produced TRNK Collection are complemented by a rotating selection from the company's more than 25 international partners. Antique African masks join postmodern re-editions—Menu's Afternoon Chair—all while sitting on carefully hued, geometrically-cut Mohair carpets. Palatial 13 foot-high drapery adorns two cast-iron, lintel-crowned windows, a striking backdrop for deco-inspired luminaires by Coil + Drift. Read the full article on our interiors and design website, aninteriormag.com.
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Malin + Goetz's new San Francisco store pairs sustainability with simplicity

What with the founders of Malin + Goetz, Matthew Malin, and Andrew Goetz, having cut their teeth in the beauty and design industry respectively, it’s no wonder that their products, as well as their retail environments, are conceived with the purest aesthetic considerations in mind. The New York-based skincare label’s minimalist packaging—bright colored lettering against a stark white background—is utilitarian with a modern flourish, a signature style they’ve extrapolated to the brand’s stores. For their new San Francisco outpost, Malin + Goetz called upon Bernheimer Architecture, the Brooklyn firm the duo previously entrusted with the design of their home office in Manhattan and their first Los Angeles store. “Malin +Goetz have always asked us for simple responses,” principal Andrew Bernheimer explained. “A modern and thoughtful approach that allows their products and the design of their products to remain legible.” Read the full article on our interiors and design website, aninteriormag.com.
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Reclaimed construction waste helped shape this Escalier resort boutique in Bali

Paying homage to the nearby coast, the Escalier fashion boutique at the Potato Head Beach Club resort in Bali, Indonesia, unexpectedly combines the refinement of traditional Indonesian craftsmanship and upcycled construction waste to emulate an earthy aesthetic. Conceived by ZXC Studio (Zhi Xiong Chan), the sprawling 1,400-square-foot retail space is programmed as a matrix of monumental display plinths, modular racks, and reflective surfaces that extend the linear void even further. Fragments of red-pigmented concrete are mixed in with polished concrete to create a bespoke terrazzo that covers floors, walls, and display platforms. This upcycled material was directly reclaimed from the construction site of the neighboring resort. Complementing this mono-material are densely textured hand-woven rattan panels that cover both walls and ceilings. Developed by BYO Living, these decorative and light-diffusing elements are joined by locally produced banana-fiber washi paper. The overall scheme strikes a careful balance between a neolithic and modernist aesthetic. Read the full article on our interiors and design website, aninteriormag.com.
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David Adjaye's first California project will be in L.A.'s Beverly Center

Clocking in at just under 900,000 square feet, the Beverly Center was by far the largest mall in Los Angeles, and one of the largest in the world, when it was first completed in 1982. The mall, which almost exclusively carries luxury retailers, received a $500 million makeover last year by Studio Fuksas that updated the visitor experience by bringing more natural light into its interior, adding a pedestrian path along the perimeter, and breaking up the hulking facade with metal grating. The makeover inspired several new retailers to rent space within the new and improved Beverly Center, including Miami-based, multi-brand fashion house The Webster. On November 20, The Webster announced that it had tapped international architecture firm Adjaye Associates to design a multilevel store on the ground floor of the mall, in a space formerly occupied by a Hard Rock Cafe. With street access on the corner of Beverly and San Vicente Boulevards, The Webster will have an independent entrance and valet-parking service separate from the rest of the complex. The project represents Adjaye Associates’ first project in California, though the firm has completed several significant projects across the country in recent years, including Ruby City in San Antonio, Texas, a “high-design” switching station in Newark, New Jersey, and the iconic Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. There are currently no available renderings of what to expect, but it is likely that the design will demonstrate the firm’s trademark attention to detail and elegant material selection. “It is such an honor to work with David,” said The Webster founder and creative director Laure Hériard Dubreuil. “To have him bring The Webster L.A. to life is an absolute dream! Each one of our locations has its own identity, from the design of the store down to the creatively curated selection of products that furnish the rails and shelves. David truly captured the essence of The Webster DNA and projected it into the future with this new beautiful iteration of The Webster.” The company was founded in 2009 and has since opened six physical locations across North America. When the Beverly Center locations open in January 2020, it will be among the largest at 11,000 square feet.
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New Practice breathes new life into New York's hospitality scene

One part cafe, the other some kind of shop or service—hybrid cafe-shops have been popping up right and left in New York City. The typologies are exhaustive: a barbershop-cum-cafe; a nail salon-cum-cafe; a record store-cum-cafe; and so on. Though, there are exceptions to the cliche. One of them is the New Practice Studio-designed tea room and accessories store, Sage Collective. As the story goes, founding partner of the Shanghai and New York-based firm, Neo Zhong, was approached by NYU graduate Feng Ye to design her first business venture: a tripartite retail-teahouse-bar space. In approximately 1,600 square feet (a modest size for a SoHo storefront), New Practice Studio devised a transformative enclave. Customers enter through a retail space with tea paraphernalia sourced from China. At the heart of the operation—the middle section—lies a cafe by day and bar by night. The expanse culminates in the rear with a semi-private tearoom.  This treatment of spaces slowly expanding into each other was inspired by traditional Chinese gardens. Traditionally, the layout of these classics landscapes were arranged so that visitors could not see the entirety at once. Instead, small vignettes were staged to be discovered as one wanders, one sees a series of intimate views.  “There are different depths of space," explained Zhong. "Your eyes are drawn to different focal points.” Read the full article on our interiors and design website, aninteriormag.com.
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World's largest Starbucks opens on downtown Chicago's Magnificent Mile

Nothing screams excess like a five-story Starbucks. But that doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist or that it’s poorly designed. Today marks the grand opening of the Seattle-based coffee giant's largest flagship store in the world. Located on Chicago’s Magnificent Mile, the 35,000-square-foot facility fills every inch of a former Crate & Barrel store originally built in 1990.  Designed by an in-house team with added help from Perkins & Will, the Starbucks Reserve Roastery Chicago takes cues from the original architecture of the largely-all-glass-and-stone department store. It boasts plenty of natural light within the five-story interior thanks to the building’s existing rotunda and floor-to-ceiling windows. The characteristic materials of a Starbucks project are all there too: Jet black metal cladding cover the walls, both light and dark wooden accents populate the bars and ceilings, while the classic bronze finish found in other Reserve projects clad the railings and machinery. One new touch that defines the Chicago flagship is the ample use of soft green throughout the space, especially notable on the perforated wood panels that line the ceiling. At the center of the space, spanning all five floors, is a towering coffee bean cask made of eight cylindrical chambers. It stretches 56 feet-tall from the ground-floor upward and is surrounded by a spiraling escalator that guests can take to the second floor. From the very top, to see conveyors drop roasted coffee beans in the cask to cool. It’s a curvy interior and it deftly matches Crate & Barrel’s curvy aesthetic. The exterior of the building has been virtually untouched and the Starbucks stamp is minimal. Despite the intervention, the structure still looks like it belongs in downtown Chicago. Among the five other Reserve projects built around the world since 2014, this retrofit has already received early praise for its adherence to the integrity of the city and space in which it exists. Chicago Tribune architecture critic Blair Kamin loved the shop upon touring it and described the architectural appeal of the new "cathedral of coffee" in his review this week:  “It’s visually theatrical, crisply designed and carefully tailored to its host city even though it springs from a well-worn corporate template,” wrote Kamin. “The flagship reminds us that modern architecture celebrates the process of making things, unlike beaux-arts buildings that hide such things behind pretty facades.”  That must be the general allure of the Starbucks Reserve brand: The company has broken out these shops not as "everyday" places to grab a coffee but more as tourist-oriented theme parks or experience centers complete with merchandise and $15-to-$20 coffees But this will also be the company's last chance to impress this way. Starbucks has announced the Chicago space will be the final Reserve flagship in its portfolio.