Posts tagged with "Restoration":

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Officials still anticipate 2024 Notre Dame reopening date despite COVID-19 pause

Today marks the one-year anniversary of the inferno-seen-around-the-globe that ravaged Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris. All things considered, Parisian officials will not hold a formal organized event or encourage any mass gatherings to mark one of the most dispiriting structural fires in recent memory. However, the medieval cathedral’s 13-ton bourdon bell, Emmanuel, tolled this evening for only the second time since the blaze on April 15, 2019, gutted the 850-year-old Gothic edifice regarded as the “Soul of France.” At 8:00 p.m. GMT, Emmanuel rang from the cathedral’s south tower in a bit of timing that coincides not only with the time that the cathedrals’ iconic spire toppled but also with the chorus of raucous cheers and applause that fill the streets of Paris nightly in recognition of the front line responders battling the coronavirus. As noted by Reuters, the tolling is in tribute to both Notre Dame's remarkable resilience and the medical professionals risking their lives on a daily basis during the pandemic. (As of this writing, 15,729 people have succumbed to the virus across France.) As for the cathedral’s aforementioned resilience, it is indeed still standing tall over Ile de la Cité, although hidden beneath fire-damaged scaffolding and in an increasingly fragile and vulnerable state. As the Associated Press wrote of Notre Dame’s present state in somewhat purple terms: “Notre Dame Cathedral stands crippled and alone, locked in a dangerous web of warped scaffolding one year after a cataclysmic fire gutted its interior, toppled its famous spire, and horrified the world.” Despite a delay in restoration work of unforeseen length due to the coronavirus, officials are confident that Notre Dame will open its doors and more closely resemble its former self by 2024, a just-ahead-of-the-Summer-Olympics completion date promised by French President Emmanuel Macron. Undeterred by pauses, pandemic-related or otherwise, Jean-Louis Georgelin, the retired army general charged with overseeing the cathedral’s restoration, is optimistic that the five-year restoration plan will not drag out any further. “If everyone rolls up their sleeves and the work is well planned, it is conceivable that returning the cathedral to a place of worship within five years will not be an impossible feat,” the Guardian reported Georgelin as saying. “Obviously, the area around the cathedral will be far from finished, and perhaps the spire will not be completed, but the cathedral will once again be a place of worship and this is our aim.” All work on Notre Dame was halted on March 17 when France entered nationwide lock-down mode and the restoration project’s small army of specialized craftsmen, known as compagnons, were dismissed. While the unknown duration of the coronavirus shutdown presents a unique challenge to the all-hands-on-deck restoration efforts, work has stopped a small handful times over the past year, including during a high wind event and for a more lengthy and necessary pause to mitigate substantial lead contamination. There’s also the issue of the spire, which has become something of a point of contention over the past year as different factions have argued whether to faithfully restore Eugene-Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc’s 19th-century design or to create a new, contemporary spire. Like with the restoration process in general, Georgelin is determined not to let any spire-squabbling slow things down. “We have to be left to get on with the work and not caught up in the controversies,” the Guardian noted him as relaying to L’Express magazine. “The quicker the decision is made about the spire, the quicker we will be able to really concentrate on the real reconstruction. It’s important that the objectives are set.” The tangle of scaffolding enveloping the cathedral, which went up just prior to the near-catastrophic blaze as part of a $6.8 million dollar restoration effort, is of particular concern, especially now that the site has largely been vacated. The scaffolding, referred to by the New York Times in 2019 as a “mass of twisted metal roughly 250 tons that is weighing down the structure,” is at high risk of collapsing—a roughly 50 percent according to experts—and meticulously removing it is a key element of assessing existing damage and then swiftly repairing it. If any single element of the repair and restoration process presents a race-against-the-clock sense of urgency, the removal of the scaffolding, which was slated to commence in March, is it. But the clock has now stopped.
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When the glass cracks at the Glass House, how is it replaced?

The Glass House, Philip Johnson’s renowned personal residence in New Canaan, Connecticut, recently replaced the oversized glass panes of its iconic exterior after cracking due to thermal stress. The home, part of a 14-building compound on the bucolic 49-acre site, now functions as a historic house museum run by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Originally completed in 1949, the Glass House features floor-to-ceiling plate glass exterior walls held in place by steel stops and black-painted steel piers of stock H-beams that expressed the mass-produced, industrial materials employed for its design. In the summer of 2019, one of the home’s 18’-0” x 7’-10” panes of existing glazing cracked due to thermal stress. The stress was caused by temperature differentials and a lack of movement within the original steel frame, said Ashley R. Wilson, FAIA, the Graham Gund Architect at the National Trust for Historic Preservation and the lead architect for the glazing replacement project. While the replacement of original building fabric is often a contentious topic in the field of historic preservation, Wilson noted that the glass that was replaced was “likely an early-generation replacement” because it was 3/8” annealed glass, meaning that it was heat-strengthened glass—a technology not available yet in the late 1940s. The original glass, Wilson pointed out in conversation, was likely a single pane of 1/4” polished plate glass, per 1948 drawings, and would have been “beautifully clear and flat, but fragile.” Although the team was not replacing the original glass, the project was not without complexity. The new glazing, provided by Canadian glass manufacturer Agnora, needed to meet ANSI safety standards, accommodate wind load (particularly challenging because of the glass’s large dimensions), avoid overloading of the existing steel supporting rail, and, of course, visually match the original design intent as closely as possible. To accomplish these goals, the selected glass was slightly thicker, at 9/16” rather than 3/8”, and laminated with an inner layer of PVB for safety, said Wilson. To avoid potential corrosion of the steel and clouding of the glass in case the inner PVB layer gets exposed to moisture, the team added weeps to the glass pocket. The removal of the existing glazing and install of the new presented a new set of challenges: The old glass was prone to more cracking, requiring extra care in its removal. In order to extract the glass, the steel stops also needed to be removed. The steel frames were cleaned, prepped, and painted before the system was reinstalled. Because construction took place in November 2019 to minimize conflicts with tours and programming, the workspace also needed to be heated and protected from the elements, explains Wilson. What’s more, she noted, “the west wall glass had to use a crane to lift the glass unit over the building,” Wilson contends that the thermal stress that caused the glass to crack was not due to extreme temperature swings due to climate change but rather to “but an inherent weakness and limitations of 3/8” thick glass at such a large size.” But despite the unique nature of the Glass House—and its oversized glazing units—there are clear lessons to be learned from the project about considerations when replacing glass at midcentury buildings. “At the Glass House, care was taken by the preservation team to analyze the replacement glass options, thickness, performance, and installation to match the original design while improving performance and complying with current safety codes,” said Wilson. While the replacement project focused more on safety and appearance rather than sustainability goals, it did take advantage of how glass technology has evolved since the 1940s and 1950s. More broadly, new glazing products such as IGUs and more effective, longer-lasting sealants can significantly improve energy efficiency for mid-century buildings, allowing for better buildings that are more highly adapted for what the 21st century will bring—global warming or otherwise.
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The future of Richard Neutra’s first U.S. building remains uncertain

The current owner of the Jardinette Apartments, the first commission the modernist architect Richard Neutra received in the United States in 1927, has worked out an agreement with the lender to pay back the necessary $214,009 to keep the building, while an auction database lists the property as an item up for auction this Friday. According to Curbed LA, Robert Clippinger of Clippinger Investment Properties purchased the Hollywood property on the corner of Marathon and Manhattan in 2016 but has not kept up with the necessary payments. The four-story building, designed with the assistance of fellow Viennese émigré and modernist architect Rudolph Schindler, is considered the first international style building in the country and helped the architect gain connections to design other projects throughout the city. A year after purchasing the property, now known as the Marathon Apartments, Clippinger contributed to a recommendation report the following year that addressed its significant state of disrepair with plans of restoration by 2018 (that never commenced). According to the report, the scope of rehabilitation, restoration, and maintenance work is substantial: it includes waterproofing the building envelope, patching and repairing the roof, restoring interior finishes, repairing and reconstructing fenestration, upgrading the fire sprinkler system, and reconstructing cabinetry in the kitchen, bathrooms and dressing rooms. The exterior, which was painted in an ahistorical beige, blue and pink combination about 20 years ago, would additionally need to be uniformly repainted white to complete the restoration. A set of images on the Clippinger website reveals what the property would look like, had the proper plans for restoration been made. Given the apartment tower’s listing on the National Register of Historic Places and designation as a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument, the city’s building and safety department revisited the 2017 report last January to grant the building a rehabilitation permit. So while it may appear up for auction, deep-pocketed preservationist will want to hold off; work to restore the building will begin sometime in the near future.
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Illinois State Capitol’s dome needs millions for repairs

A comprehensive inspection performed late last year by Chicago-based architecture and engineering firm Bailey Edward has found that the exterior metal skin of the 235-foot-tall dome topping the Illinois Statehouse in Springfield potentially needs to be replaced to stave off damage caused by active leaking. Per Capitol News Illinois, plastic sheeting is currently being used to guide rainwater and prevent leaks from entering the capitol’s magnificent stained glass inner dome and public areas of the structure. While the Statehouse has undergone several major renovations over the decades, including a $50 million overhaul in 2011, Bailey Edward noted that the dome itself has “been neglected, giving way to cracks and leaks.” The firm’s forthcoming report is set to “include a detailed and prioritized list of recommended corrections and repairs to guide the future preservation efforts of the Illinois State Capitol Dome.” Earlier restoration work performed on the nearly 93-foot-wide, 361-foot-tall dome’s protective metal shell was completed in 1975 for $950,000. Harl Ray, senior project manager for the secretary of state’s Department of Physical Services, anticipated that the cost to replace the faulty skin will range in the “ballpark of $5 million” based on the 1975 costs. This estimate is roughly $700,000 more than the initial cost of constructing the landmark Renaissance Revival capitol building in the first place, which first broke ground in 1868 and took 20 years to complete. Designed by Chicago-based Cochrane and Garnsey, the Illinois Statehouse’s soaring signature dome has helped the building achieve a notable claim to fame as the tallest classical-style state capitol in the United States at 361 feet (save for the 391-foot-tall Art Deco Nebraska Capitol). The Statehouse’s record-setting height seems appropriate given Illinois’ reputation for superlatively lanky buildings. In addition to a brand new metal skin, the study is also expected to recommend replacing the current flagpole atop the dome so that the process of raising and lowering the flag can be more streamlined—and less harrowing—for workers. “Our guys and gals are at great risk when they’re up there changing the flag. It might be zero wind down here, but up there it feels like 25 or so,” Mike Wojcik, director of Physical Services for the secretary of state’s office, told Capitol News Illinois. “We’ve been fortunate that we have volunteers that want to go up, but more and more, we have less and less people that are not too afraid to go up there.”

BuildingsNY 2019

EXPERIENCE THE FULL BUILDINGS LIFECYCLE

BuildingsNY is sponsored by ABO (Associated Builders and Owners of Greater New York), CHIP (Community Housing Improvement Program), The AIA, NYARM, ASHRAE LI, and a host of other industry supporters. BuildingsNY is the single source, full product life-cycle solution to safely and cost-effectively operate your buildings with a unique combination of an exhibition, no-cost accredited education, partnership opportunities, and networking events.  

WHAT WILL YOU FIND AT BUILDINGSNY

  • 5,500 + Building industry professionals
  • 300+ suppliers
  • 35,000 square feet of event space offering state-of-the-art innovation technologies, goods and services to reduce costs for your building
  • Industry leaders and subject matter experts offering the opportunity to share their extensive knowledge with new codes & industry trends
  • Free accredited education
  • MORE innovation & technology, goods and services
  • MORE State-of-the-Art product launches than ever before
Learn More

WHAT'S IN STORE FOR 2019

  • All education sessions will be moved to the show floor, creating three Learning Theaters.
  • Updated Advisory Council consisting of building professionals who shape the industry.
  • New partnerships with a wide range of media, as well as strengthening the relationships with current supporters.
  • Back by popular demand! Tech Tank Pavilion will feature new buildings technologies. Source the next big product or service that can revolutionize building operations as we know it.
  • Unlimited access to the complimentary Lead Retrieval App, which allows you to easily collect, qualify & download the contact details of the customers you meet at BuildingsNY.
  • Education Sessions for 2019 will focus on profitability, compliance and managerial excellence. You'll leave with a fresh perspective on how to solve problems, increase efficiencies, unlock saving and keep your buildings at their peak.
  • Attorney Advice Center: Powered by NYARM – During 15-minute intervals, attorneys and attendees will meet one-on-one focusing on important areas of practice (April 2 and April 3, 2019 | 11:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.| Located at Booth #231

Call for Entries: Reviving NPAK

By the initiative of the Boghossian Foundation, urbanlab announces an open international architectural competition “Reviving NPAK” for all interested individuals and teams. The purpose of the present architectural competition is to find the best design solutions for the existing building of NPAK located at 1/3 Buzand Street of Yerevan (Armenia), which needs to reflect the aspects of the competition package through contemporary architectural language that is conscious of social and environmental responsibility, the importance for radical technical experimentation and the need to sustain a dialogue with the Centre’s legacy and its traditions. Serving as a meeting point between the art community, the youth, general public, the creative and business sector, the revived Centre should become a facilitator between innovative artistic thinking, mass culture and industry. The current redevelopment project is a multi-stage plan for future growth, revivification and expansion of NPAK. It presents an opportunity to create the largest temporary exhibition space in Armenia, which will simultaneously serve as one of the key cultural, entertainment and educational hubs in Yerevan. Participation There is no application fee for participation. The submission deadline is 25 June 2019, while winners will be announced on 3 July 2019. For participation and request for competition package please send an email to npak@urbanlab.am mentioning “Competition Package” in the subject line, following which you will receive the link needed for participation. For more information about the competition and how to participate please follow this link. Award The total award budget is 6’000’000 AMD (approx. 12’000 USD), which will be distributed between the below mentioned award categories.
  • 1st: 2’500’000 AMD (approx. 5’000 USD)
  • 2nd: 1’500’000 AMD (approx. 3’000 USD)
  • 3rd: 1’000’000 AMD (approx. 2’000 USD)
  • Jury’s mention(s): 1’000’000 AMD (approx. 2’000 USD)
Jury The competition Jury consists of nine professionals, the majority being architects from Armenia and abroad. London-based architect Mr. Philip Gumuchdjian will chair over the Jury. The Jury members are:
  1. Philip Gumuchdjian, Architect, Gumuchdjian Architects (UK)
  2. Albert Boghossian, Boghossian Foundation Co-Chairman (Switzerland)
  3. Arthur Meschyan, Architect, Chief Architect of Yerevan (Armenia)
  4. Eduard Balassanian, Architect, NPAK Co-Founder (Armenia, USA)
  5. Misak Khostikyan, Architect, Art Historian (Armenia)
  6. Nadim Karam, Architect, Artist (Lebanon)
  7. Sarhat Petrosyan, Architect, Planner (Armenia)
  8. Verena von Beckerath, Architect, Chair for Design and Housing at Bauhaus-Universität Weimar (Germany)
  9. Vigen Galstyan, Curator, Art Historian (Armenia, Australia)
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Historic Trinity Church begins decades-overdue restoration

Today, Manhattan’s historic Trinity Church commenced an approximately two-year restoration project. The last restoration of the church occurred over seven decades ago in 1946. New York’s Murphy Burnham & Buttrick is leading the restoration of three-century old church. Trinity Church is one of the oldest parishes in New York City. The congregation moved to its Richard Upjohn-designed Gothic Revival house of worship in 1846. Since then, Trinity has built three additions to Upjohn’s original design, including the All Saints’ Chapel. Upjohn was a cofounder of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and a prodigious ecclesiastical architect in New York and New England. The nearly $100 million project will bring the church to contemporary accessibility and environmental standards through the construction of wheelchair-accessible ramps along the church’s entrances, gender-neutral restrooms, and a new steel-and-glass canopy adjacent to the south elevation. While a significant portion of the project is dedicated to new alterations, Murphy Burnham & Buttrick are fully repairing and restoring the church’s stained-glass windows, redesigning historic pews, and replacing non-original clerestory fenestration. Additionally, the church’s chancel will be adapted to Upjohn’s original design, boosting seating capacity by 140 seats. In a statement, Trinity Church Vicar Reverend Phil Jackson said the decades of deferred window maintenance shrouded the church’s interior detailing under a layer of shadow. Through the restoration, Jackson hopes to highlight the nave and main body’s impressive Gothic rib vaults and collenettes by giving “back its light.” Murphy Burnham & Buttrick has amassed a wide scope of residential and religious restorations across New York City, including an expansive top-down project for St. Patrick’s Cathedral, which involved the conservation of interior and exterior masonry and stained glass windows, and even the insertion of a nine-well geothermal plant below the cathedral. During the restoration process, Trinity Church’s nave and main body will be closed off to parishioners and visitors. The project is slated to be completed  by spring 2020, and Trinity Church hopes to reopen the nave soon after.
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Historic Capitol Theatre in Flint, Michigan to be restored

By this time next year, Flint, Michigan’s, Capitol Theatre will once again host live performances. Opened in 1928, the historic theater was designed by John Eberson, and was once the largest theater in Flint. Under the design guidance of DLR Group|Westlake Reed Leskosky, renovations of the building will be completed by the end of 2017 or the beginning of 2018. The Whiting, another theater in Flint, and the not-for-profit Uptown Reinvestment Corporation are spearheading the project. “The Capitol Theatre was once the community’s living room so-to-speak, where residents gathered for shared cultural experiences and live entertainment,” said Jarret M. Haynes, Executive Director of The Whiting. “The Capitol’s re-opening will deepen the impact of our vibrant arts community and become a resource to foster creativity right here in Flint. We are so proud to bring this treasure back to the city and look forward to welcoming visitors from the city and region for generations to come.” The Capitol Theatre was added to the National Registry of Historic Places in 1985, but it has laid vacant since 1996. Starting in 1970s the 1,600-seat theater played host to many popular acts, including Ray Charles, AC/DC, John Mellencamp, Green Day, and Black Sabbath. The experience of the theater was so designed to evoke the idea of sitting in an outdoor amphitheater. The restoration will bring back many of the theater’s original details while updating its technology. Restorations will be extensive, on the interior and exterior of the building. The original 1928 facade will be fully restored with its intricate terracotta ornament. The ceiling of the auditorium will be restored to its sky-like appearance, to include lighting special effects that mimic the transition of day and night. Decorative plasterwork and statuary throughout the building will also be brought back to its former glory. A new marquee and sign are already visible on the building, which started restorations in mid-2016. While the theater may be brought back to its original aesthetics, its new technology will be state-of-the-art. While the theater seats will be replicas of the originals, the sound, acoustics, lighting, backstage, and front-of-house will all be updated. Along with updating the performance space, 25,000 square feet of office and retail space will be reopened in the building. When completed, it is hoped that the theater will host about 100 events a year, attracting more than 60,000 guests annually. This article appears on HoverPin, a new app that lets you build personalized maps of geo-related online content based on your interests: architecture, food, culture, fitness, and more. Never miss The Architect’s Newspaper’s coverage of your area and discover new, exciting projects wherever you go! See our HoverPin layer here and download the app from the Apple Store.
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A new petition aims to turn 360 unbuildable lots in NYC into green spaces

The New York Restoration Project (NYRP) has launched a petition to turn more than 360 lots deemed unbuildable into parks, gardens, and other green spaces, often in underserved neighborhoods. These lots are considered unusable for building because of their odd size, shape, or proneness to flooding. Rather than leaving them abandoned, the NYRP is offering to transform these patches of land into usable green spaces. They are petitioning the Mayor's office to place this land under their care. Public parks are an incredibly valuable part of a neighborhood, with benefits to quality of life for residents as well as potential for urban farming and use as a community space. Parks are often few and far between in the neighborhoods that need them most, while those in more affluent neighborhoods tend to have more resources available for maintenance. By acquiring this otherwise unusable land from the city and relying on volunteers for labor, the NYRP would be able to provide an essential service to underserved neighborhoods in all five boroughs at a low cost, as well as cleaning up the vacant lots. The NYRP just celebrated the 20th anniversary of its founding by Bette Midler in 1995. The non-profit organization revitalizes neglected parks across the five boroughs, specifically in underserved neighborhoods. In 1999, Midler and the NYRP led a coalition to save 114 community gardens being auctioned off by the city for commercial development. They now maintain 52 of those community gardens with the help of volunteers. The organization also completed their MillionTreesNYC initiative on November 20, 2015, two years ahead of schedule. With the help of the NYC Department of Parks and Recreation, the NYRP planted one million trees across the five boroughs. They also offer free trees for New Yorkers to plant in their yards. Sign the petition here, and find more opportunities to donate or volunteer on the NYRP website.
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Alberta's only Frank Lloyd Wright building to be rebuilt

Thanks to the Frank Lloyd Wright Revival Initiative, Banff National Park in Alberta may once again have its own Frank Lloyd Wright-designed building almost 100 years after the original structure was demolished. The Banff Park Pavilion was originally built in 1914 on commission from the Canadian government and designed in conjunction with Francis Conroy Sullivan (Wright's only Canadian student). It only stood for 25 years but was demolished in 1939 due to structural damage. The pavilion went through several stages of use in its brief life. It was initially conceived as a visitor center by the Department of Public Works by the National Parks Service, with the local community putting forth ideas about its design. However, given the timing of its completion at the start of World War I, it was repurposed by the Department of Defense into a quartermaster's store. After the war the pavilion was used for its original intended purpose: a picnic area and shelter. However, its location on the bank of the Bow River was prone to flooding and frost heaving, which damaged wooden floor supports. It was torn down in 1939 despite the resistance of park-goers. The Frank Lloyd Wright Revival Initiative is dedicated to rebuilding Frank Lloyd Wright structures on their original footprints according to their original design, allowing for changes only due to modern building code requirements. The Banff Park Pavilion will be their first project. The building is a great example of Wright's signature Prairie School architectural style, common in the American midwest but rare in Canada. According to the Frank Lloyd Wright Initiative, it was in fact the only building of this style in the country. It will also be the second Frank Lloyd Wright building in Canada. The number of yearly visitors to Banff National Park has grown to almost 3.6 million annually, and the pavilion has the potential to once again become a well used feature of the park as well as a tourist attraction in its own right. According to Canadian Architect, the proposal was accepted by the Banff Town Council, who is now conducting a feasibility study as Phase I of the project. The Frank Lloyd Wright Revival Initiative is accepting donations that will go toward funding the project.
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Why critics are skeptical of renovations bringing eternal youth to Chartres Cathedral

In 2009, the French Ministry of Culture began an $18 million restoration of the medieval Chartres Cathedral, a UNESCO World Heritage Site 50 miles southwest of Paris. By 2017, the Gothic structure is intended to look similar to the original 1194–1250 construction. However, as the past 765 years  of dirt and grime are erased, critics are denouncing the project. To cleanse the interior of candle and oil grime, the French Ministry of Culture is painting the interior masonry its original color, a creamy-white. However, the freshly painted masonry looks out of place against the undulating stone floor. And now, the floor, worn by centuries of pilgrims, looks filthy against the freshly painted walls. Originally, the vaults were illuminated by candles that hung from the columns and natural light that filtered through the stained glass windows. Now, the space is lit with bright, 21st century lighting. Martin Filler, in his blog on the New York Review of Books website, accused Patrice Calvel, former architect in chief of the French Ministry of Culture, of a destruction similar to “adding arms to the Venus de Milo.” In an article in Le Figaro, Adrien Goetz compared it to “watching a film in a cinema where they haven’t switched off the lights.” Calvel defended his “vacuum cleaning,” saying, “It has the full weight of the administration of state, historians and architects who decided over a 20-year period what would be done.” But when asked whether or not parishioners were consulted, Calvel said, “I’m very democratic, but the public is not competent to judge.” Calvel’s research unveiled that in medieval times, “everything was painted.” However, Calvel will not paint the exterior, saying, “If we tried to do that on the outside I would be hanged.” Stefan Evans, Franco Scardino, Leila Amineddoleh, and Adachiara Zevi started a petition, Save Chartres Cathedral, to stop the renovation. The four sponsors believe Chartres’s restoration violates the 1964 Venice Charter, which prohibits the addition of new construction, demolition, or modification of historic buildings in ways that change the original composition and color. Save Chartres Cathedral has 573 supporters and counting. The petition can be signed here.
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Before the Department of Homeland Security moves into its old insane asylum home, the National Historic Landmark will need some intense TLC

Although a designated landmark, the proposed new site for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in the heart of the St. Elizabeths West Campus, Washington D.C., is an intense fixer-upper. Working with architects Shalom Baranes Associates and contractor Grunley Construction, the General Services Administration proposes a total renovation of the 264,300 square foot Center Building, a collection of seven connected structures that served as patient treatment rooms and administrative offices for the original Government Hospital for the Insane. It later became known as the St. Elizabeths Hospital. Once rehabilitated, the Center Building will house the DHS headquarters and the Secretary’s Office. Located north of the U.S. Coast Guard headquarters, the 176-acre west campus was recognized as a National Historic Landmark in 1990. The Center Building was shuttered three years ago following the transfer of St. Elizabeths Hospital functions to the east campus, and photos submitted to the National Capital Planning Commission show that the building is deteriorating on the inside. Its exterior openings were boarded up in 2014 in advance of its reuse. "Basically, this project entails the integration of a completely new building within the envelope of the original and restored facades,” reads the submission to the NCPC. “Critical to the project's success is not only the preservation of important historic fabric, but the optimum interplay between historic planning ideals and modern, efficient workspace." The preservation and restoration project includes building stabilization from below grade, masonry repairs, window replacements, the removal and reconstruction of interior walls and floors, porch reconstruction, and landscape upgrades, among other fixes. To finance the repairs, President Barack Obama’s fiscal 2016 budget request includes $379.7 million to fund the second and third phases of the DHS campus consolidation.