Posts tagged with "Restaurants":

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Philippe Starck crafts nautical dream world for new Miami restaurant

This article appears in The Architect’s Newspaper’s April 2017 issue, which takes a deep dive into Florida to coincide with the upcoming AIA Conference on Architecture in Orlando (April 27 to 29). We’re publishing the issue online as the Conference approaches—click here to see the latest articles to be uploaded.

Chef José Andrés, James Beard Award winner and pioneer of molecular gastronomy, will lead the culinary team of Bazaar Mar, a new 7,200-square-foot restaurant just south of the Miami River in Arquitectonica’s newly built SLS Brickell tower. Designer Philippe Starck crafted a nautical dream world complete with mythical sea beasts, picturesque coastal vignettes, and a characteristic white and navy color palette.

The main space is composed of two dining rooms and a raw bar materially connected with over 6,000 hand-painted tiles featuring the drawings of artist Sergio Mora and manufactured in Spain by Cerámica Artística San Ginés. The tiles completely cover the walls and ceiling, painted in a Delft Blue pastiche that is typical of 16th-century Dutch pottery. The murals are ornamented with gilded crustaceans and cabaret-style mermaids that dissolve the otherwise solid walls into surrealist other worlds. Likenesses of people involved in the project appear throughout the murals including Chef Andrés. The furnishings are varied, including smooth marble-topped tables, upholstered love seats, and stark white wooden chairs, creating a visually heterogeneous atmosphere against which the maritime fantasy emerges.

The bright dining room is contrasted with a detached cocktail bar finished in black and gold tiles of the same stylized motif. The total effect of Starck’s design fittingly underscores Andrés seafood-centric menu and draws from the aura of Miami’s burgeoning art scene.

Bazaar Mar 1300 South Miami Avenue, Miami Tel: 305-615-5859 Designer: Phillipe Starck

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150-year-old New York bar finds a new home in Austin, Texas

The 150-year-old Cedar Tavern bar in New York City once hosted luminaries such as Jackson Pollack, Willem De Kooning, Bob Dylan, and Jimi Hendrix in Greenwich Village. Now that very same bar lives on at Eberly, South Austin’s new restaurant. When the Cedar Tavern closed in 2006, Eberly partners John Scott and Eddy Patterson bought the nearly 12-foot-tall and 40-foot-long mahogany bar, took some photographs of it, and transferred it in hundred of pieces to a storage unit back in Austin. Then, they set about finding an appropriate home for their haul, landing on a former 15,000-square-foot print shop on South Lamar Boulevard. ICON Design + Build worked with Clayton & Little Architects and interior designer Mickie Spencer to incorporate the Cedar Tavern Bar into a series of spaces including a dining room, coffee shop, and 4,000-square-foot rooftop patio. ICON’s Jonas Durfor, a master carpenter, reconstructed the bar. Reused materials permeate the space, whose prefabricated construction allowed for design interventions without compromising the original components—vintage cotton gin windows were interspersed throughout the interior spaces to allow light in, while the original building’s concrete floor tiles were reused in the patio. Despite a design inspired by an eclectic mix of art nouveau, Victorian, midcentury modern, and British greenhouses from the 1800s, the space is tied together with its color scheme: blues, greens, brass, and mahogany. Each room is coordinated to allow patrons to spend their entire day at the Eberly, from coffee in the study, to drinks on the bar or in the patio, to a meal in the dining room.

Eberly 615 South Lamar Boulevard Austin, Texas Tel: 512-916-9000 Architect: ICON Design + Build and Clayton & Little Architects

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Traditional masonry vaulting inspired the sculptural ceiling of this L.A. eatery

Amazebowls, a casual health food chain that began as a food truck, recently opened its first brick-and-mortar storefront in Michael Maltzan Architecture’s (MMA) One Santa Fe building in Los Angeles.

The storefront space was designed by 64North, a Los Angeles–based architecture, branding, and product design firm with deep ties to the building: Cofounder and design director Wil Carson was a designer at MMA for a decade and worked on One Santa Fe. Carson described the project as an opportunity to productively engage with the recent iconic structure by designing an “animated element within the larger project, creating a modest yet dramatic experience at the southern terminus of One Santa Fe.”

For the 600-square-foot storefront, 64North drew inspiration from traditional architectural forms, namely masonry vaulting. Carson explained that the project “recalls the classic form of a series of domes, assembled here in a celebratory, contemporary way, as they are individually scaled and distorted, intersecting to create a non-uniform whole.” The designers filled the store with a few key elements, including a sculptural ceiling made of CNC-milled, high-density EPS foam that has been plastered over, a sinuous, maple wood panel accent wall, and a semi-circular stone counter lit by gold-painted Pablo Swell pendant lights. The lofted ceiling extends beyond the curtain wall glazing along Santa Fe Avenue to denote a small exterior seating area located beneath an extended overhang.

Amazebowls 300 S. Santa Fe Avenue, Los Angeles Tel: 310-384-2202 Architect: 64North

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Aidlin Darling Design balances raw and polished surfaces in SFMOMA’s In Situ restaurant

San Francisco–based Aidlin Darling Design (ADD) and three-starred Michelin chef Corey Lee have teamed up for In Situ, a new 150-seat restaurant located within the original Mario Botta–designed portion of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art that was recently expanded by Snøhetta.

The restaurant is designed as an alternate-dimension art museum, where “borrowed” dishes on loan from the kitchens of the world’s most renowned chefs make up the menu, meticulously recreated by Lee’s team. And so, ADD has rendered an intentionally spare interior made of mostly-found surfaces, with many of the existing, roughed-out textures of the extant space remaining—some polished, some raw. Other interior elements, inserted neatly into that rough, gray box, act as bespoke elements: a sculptural timber ceiling, custom-made tables hewn from raw logs, and delicate bar stools and lounge chairs. Site-specific artworks are also scattered around the restaurant, which is lit from one side by a large storefront window opening onto Third Street.

The space is divided into two dining areas. The first, a large, informal dining room, is populated by bar-top and communal tables, is capped by the sculptural timber ceiling. Its surface is made up of delicately jagged and parallel wooden boards and extends across both dining rooms, alternating between various degrees of geometric relief. Further into the space, the second, more formal dining room is made up of intimate seating areas.

In Situ 151 Third Street San Francisco, CA Tel: 415-941 6050 Designer: Aidlin Darling Design (ADD)

[In Situ also won our 2016 Best of Design Award for Interior > Retail/Hospitality. Click here to learn more!]

This article appears on HoverPin, a new app that lets you build personalized maps of geo-related online content based on your interests: architecture, food, culture, fitness, and more. Never miss The Architect's Newspaper's coverage of your city and discover new, exciting projects wherever you go! See our HoverPin layer here and download the app from the Apple Store.

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New Austin restaurant turns kitchen into “culinary stage” for guests to see food prep

2400 East Cesar Chavez Street in Austin was once a mid-century industrial warehouse occupied by a local bottling company. Now, the address is known as Juniper—a new northern Italian–inspired restaurant in Austin’s Holly District that joins a host of eateries that line the street. 

The renovation into an upscale contemporary restaurant was born from a collaboration between chef Nicholas Yanes and Austin-based studios, Sanders Architecture and Cravotta Interiors. As per Yanes’s request, the two studios were tasked with designing a space to bring the energy from the kitchen directly into the dining area.

To accomplish that, concrete beams and timber joists from the original structure have been left exposed within the 18-foot high dining space. Meanwhile, a floor-to-ceiling glass and steel wall that looks onto a courtyard facilitates a sense of openness.

This transparent theme prevails into the kitchen and bar. At Juniper, the kitchen is viewed as a “culinary stage” and guests are able to see Yanes’s team prepare dishes and drinks. Those eager to get closer to the action can sit at one of the 12 “chef’s counter” seats for a full-on view.

Juniper 2400 East Cesar Chavez Street, Austin, TX Tel: 512-220-9421 Designers: Sanders Architecture and Cravotta Interiors

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Taco Bell announces shipping container restaurant

This post is part of our years-long running Eavesdrop series (think Page 6 for the architectural field). It’s your best source for gossip, insider stories, and more. Have an eavesdrop of your own? Send it to: eavesdrop[at]archpaper.com.

After the world’s first Taco Bell was saved by preservationists in 2015, it seems the chain has taken a liking to architecture. Last year, under the flags #savetacobell and “Save Taco Bell Numero Uno,” T-Bell moved the building from Downey, California, to its headquarters in Irvine after it paraded through Orange and Los Angeles Counties on a truck. This year, it announced its first shipping container restaurant. Let's just hope there will be space for bathrooms!

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A fast-casual restaurant’s signature dish—and traditional fish markets—inspires its design

Mainland Poke, a fast-casual restaurant specializing in chopped fish bowl restaurants recently opened a second outfit at the Americana outdoor pedestrian mall in Glendale, designed by Culver City, California–based Abramson Teiger Architects. The original location is located in Los Angeles's Beverly Grove neighborhood.

The firm utilized poke bowls’ aquatic origin—a poke bowl is a dish of cubed fresh fish served over rice and topped with an assortment of flavorful toppings—and the traditional fish markets where one might go to acquire their ingredients, as inspiration: A polished concrete floor is topped by a medley of fine design objects such as minimalist chairs and tables and smooth marble countertops. The 1200-square-foot store consists of a single brightly lit dining room facing the street, its mostly-glass storefront supplemented by a glass block transom window.

A decorative pattern comprised of variously recessed wooden blocks lines a main interior wall, while tessellated white tiles reminiscent of fish scales wrap the separate food preparation area. Design principal Trevor Abramson explained, “The white tiles and wood talk to materials found in a traditional fish market and are a perfect palette for the vibrant colors found in the fresh fish poke.”

Mainland Poke 252 S. Brand Boulevard, Glendale, CA Tel: 213-712-2683 Architects: Abramson Teiger Architects

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LPC votes to calendar Kevin Roche and John Dinkeloo’s Ambassador Grill and Lobby

Today the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) voted to calendar Kevin Roche and John Dinkerloo's Ambassador Grill and Lobby at ONE UN New York Hotel, previously known as the United Nations Hotel. Now that it's on on the LPC's calendar, the space is safe from demolition (for now). The luxe late modern United Nations Plaza Hotel Lobby (completed 1983) and Ambassador Grill & Lounge (completed 1976) at One United Nations Plaza were threatened with demolition when the current owners, Millennium Hotels and Resorts, closed the restaurant to commence a significant renovation that would have stripped the space of its characteristic mirroring, white-veined black stone, and trompe l’oeil skylights. Preservationists, naturally, were outraged. Advocacy groups like Docomomo's national chapter and MAS were joined by local preservationists Peg Breen, president of the New York Landmarks Conservancy, Theodore Grunewald, vice president of the Committee to Save the New York Public Library, and members of local Docomomo chapters who together rallied to save the spaces by asking the LPC to consider designating the lobby and grill as interior landmarks. There are currently 117 interiors that are New York City landmarks, and only four of those are restaurants. When reached for comment, a member of ONE UN New York Hotel's management team told The Architect's Newspaper that, with the General Assembly in session, the hotel couldn't answer questions about the status of the Ambassador Grill. "You picked the wrong time to call," said a woman who would only give her first name, Pat.
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Japanese joinery with modern flair defines this San Francisco ramen spot

The recent proliferation of oh-so-chic ramen joints in cities across the country can sometimes mask what it is really all about: The ramen. In Japan, this fast, fragrant, noodle-and-broth dish is often found in nondescript establishments, tucked away from the bustling street. At Orenchi Beyond, the restaurant chain’s first San Francisco location, the ramen is front and center, starting with a floating, open kitchen anchoring the 1,800-square-foot space where patrons can see chefs at work behind a row of large, boiling soup pots. Taking its cue from Japan’s street culture and indigenous craftsmanship, the restaurant, designed by local firm Craig Steely Architecture, fuses the unfussy, Japanese-style ramen shop with a West Coast design sensibility.

To maximize the outdoor connection and exploit the temperate San Francisco climate, principal and founder Craig Steely decided to knock down the existing facade, which originally stood flat across the front of the building, and push it back 12 feet to create what he describes as an “interstitial room” or an “engawa space” between the street and restaurant interior. “In Japan, there isn’t that luxury to have this whole space, and it seemed like such a perfect opportunity,” Steely explained. “It feels different from other restaurants in the city where there is a hard, demarcating line. Here it is really indoor-outdoor and welcoming—eating and drinking outside is nice and communal. It’s a real mix of private and public space.”

The prismlike facade, punctuated by a red glass door, is made of Sakura wood and quietly references Japanese woodworking. “It was an attempt to build upon a language of Japanese carpentry,” said Steely. “I took the idea of those details and built it in a way that appreciates or riffs on Japanese joinery without it being authentically Japanese.” The permeable storefront allows for customers to be served outside through the windows.

In typical Japanese style, the restaurant bears no sign—in many ways, the crowd congregating outside around a 4,000-pound Yuba River basalt rock is the unofficial signage. Of course, the line of sake bottles in the window is also a not-so-subtle clue as to what lies inside.

Painstaking attention was paid to the details to reflect and pay homage to Japanese traditions, from the visual iconography to the craftsmanship. The stool seating is based on sake barrels, the brackets and handles are made of elm branches by artist Kenji Hasegawa, and the interior wood is from Paul Discoe’s Joinery Structures, who has worked on projects in Japan for several decades.

Contrasting this otherwise muted space are a massive, candy-colored mural of a fractal bear by local artists Ricardo Richey and Chad Hasegawa and tables featuring paintings with imagery from Japanese myths and Yakuza films, such as a dragon in the form of ramen with its tail spelling out “Orenchi.” For a restaurant named the “Beyond,” this West-meets-farther-West space is wholly appropriate.

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Chicago’s LondonHouse opens with infinitely Instagrammable rooftop bar and restaurant

One of the best ways to experience Chicago is from a rooftop, so naturally hoteliers are cashing in. Case in point: The new Goettsch Partners-designed LondonHouse. Located at the corner of North Michigan Avenue and Wacker Drive, along the East Branch of the Chicago River, the 452-room hotel boosts a three-story penthouse bar and restaurant. The LondonHouse is a hybrid renovation-new-build with 183,000 of its total 250,000 square feet located in the historic Alfred Alschuler–designed 1923 London Guarantee Building. The remaining 67,000 square feet are in a narrow sliver of a building that finally completes Wacker’s streetwall, filling an odd 20-spot surface parking lot. This contemporary curtain-walled addition acts as the entry to the hotel with a second-floor lobby and restaurant, the Bridges Lobby Bar.

The main draw of the hotel for guests and the public alike is the three-story LH bar and restaurant on the building’s roof. With infinitely Instagrammable views up and down the river, the scene is a veritable architect’s dream. Directly across from the hotel sits no less than, Marina City, AMA Plaza (formerly IBM), the Trump Tower, the Wrigley Building, and the Tribune Tower. With special attention paid to the city’s landmarks codes, a cupola of the Guarantee Building has also been opened for events, accessible through LondonHouse.

LondonHouse 85 E Upper Wacker Dr., Chicago Tel: 312-357-1200 Architect: Goettsch Partners Interior Design: Simeone Deary Design Group

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Sleek quinoa automat coming to NYC

Love quinoa but loathe human interaction? A California–based restaurant is bringing its healthy quinoa power bowl automat (yeah) to Midtown this fall. At Eatsa, which has locations in San Francisco and Los Angeles, patrons order via iPads instead of popping coins into a slot in exchange for food. Diners can customize their quinoa bowls, or choose options like the "Cantina Kale Salad" or "Chili con Quinoa" a-la-carte. In the video below, food blogger Eddie Lin, alternating between amazement and pure, unadulterated joy, offers a blow-by-blow look at the bowl-ordering process: Other corners of the internet are abuzz about the old-fangled concept updated for 21st-century habits. See this diner pick up his food and beverages from the slot with his name displayed on it:

Greetings from the future. Coolest restaurant ever!!! #eatsa @meagle23

A video posted by Chelsea Franco (@francothetank0) on

Quinoa bowls are prepared behind the scenes by real live people but delivered automatically into cubbies with light-up, numbered displays and include the diner's name. While Bamn!, the short-lived automat on St. Marks Place, had a vintage, Jetsons-in-pink aesthetic, Eatsa's brand skews more Apple Store. Crucially, while the automats of yore kept items to temperature with in-cubby heating, Eatsa's items are made to order.
As an added bonus, all dishes are priced under $7.00. Mmmm.
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Chioco Design crafts an ingenious lighting solution for indoor-outdoor Austin bar

Austin’s newest bar, Backbeat, sits on busy South Lamar Boulevard, a main drag that was strictly car-oriented until recently. “Our main concern and objective was to create a comfortable neighborhood cocktail bar,” explained Jamie Chioco, principal of Austin-based Chioco Design. Drawing from their experience running popular watering hole drink-well, Backbeat’s owners are enticing South Lamar’s pedestrians with the Pink Squirrel (a spiked milkshake), pâté melts, and an indoor-outdoor dining area that offers a pleasant contrast to its hectic surroundings. To beckon patrons and light into the long, narrow interior, Chioco installed a large monitor—essentially a two-story glass shaft—to visually connect the roof deck with the main floor below. One wall of the shaft is clad in mirrors, giving patrons views to the outdoors above. Through the glass-paneled main and rear entryways, bright desert-blue booths and stools complement the walnut wall and ceiling panels, as well as the brass light fixtures and white marble bar, the heart of all the action. Backbeat is located at 1300 S. Lamar Boulevard, Austin, TX.