Posts tagged with "Reno":

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$1.2 billion eco-friendly district will rise in Reno, Nevada

Architect and developer Don J Clark Group and landscape architects Office of Cheryl Barton (OCB) are currently at work on the initial phases of the world’s first high desert biome eco-district, West 2nd District, a new $1.2 billion purpose-built neighborhood in the heart of downtown Reno, Nevada.

The project proposes taking over a series of underutilized lots in order to jumpstart an ecologically driven neighborhood containing 1,900 housing units, 450,000 square feet of office space, and 250,000 square feet of retail space. The nearly 30-building district will provide needed market-rate and workforce housing as well, with 20 percent of rental units available as affordable housing for those who qualify.

The construction of a new district—bounded along its southern edge by the Truckee River, a tributary to Pyramid Lake and Lake Tahoe—also represents a special opportunity to connect Reno to nature more efficiently than piecemeal implementation would. OCB is looking to integrate the district’s street life with the surrounding natural habitat in biome-specific ways. “We are very interested in the authenticity of the landscape and in bringing the larger ecology into the city,” Cheryl Barton said. Barton aims to plant over 300 trees across the 17-acre site; the firm aims to establish and expand a sense of pedestrian comfort on the street by reducing heat-island effect. OCB is also embedding expanses of vertical and horizontal gardens throughout the plan, including on rooftops. Barton explained further: “We are taking an artistic approach to the paseo design—there will be broad, shallow channels [embedded in the paseos] that can be used for patio seating regularly and, during the rainy season, can collect water.”

The district will be fully integrated with regard to stormwater sequestration and wastewater treatment, and will also employ a variety of digital tools to monitor and control these adaptive systems. For Barton, the relationship between these technical components and her efforts to make Reno’s streetscapes more bearable are two sides of the same coin. “Landscapes are a system like any other: It’s all about understanding the climate, the water, the soil, and the connectivity of that system, and bringing that understanding into the public realm.”

One hope is that the West 2nd District can feed Reno’s booming technology industry. Reno is affordable—and a 45-minute flight from Silicon Valley—so it is absorbing regional economic and population growth. Tesla operates its Gigafactory in Sparks, Nevada, just outside Reno, and Apple operates cloud-computing servers in the area as well.

The influx of technology-related capital is a boon for Reno, and continued investment will likely fuel the continued growth of West 2nd. “We are focusing on a lot of categories,” said Don Clark, “from being an eco-district to pursuing LEED accreditation to focusing on walkable communities and complete streets—and are ultimately making a new, next-generation, integrated section of a city.”

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Developer pitches new $1.2 billion downtown proposal for Reno

Two weeks ago we reported Las Vegas city officials and outside consultants are proposing a new downtown. Now farther north in Reno, local developer Don J Clark Group has unveiled plans for a new downtown. Their proposal centers on both physical infrastructure (a large park, water reclamation, building a tower downtown taller than the current 42-story Silver Legacy Casino Resort) as well as virtual (gigabit internet). "The project is aimed at finding a creative solution to a variety of distinct challenges that the city of Reno...has faced over the course of the last half of the century or so,” Colin Robertson, partner and director of communications and strategy for Don J Clark Group told Nevada Public Radio. Dubbed the West Second Street District, the over $1.2 billion development is planned for north of the Truckee River and west of Virginia Street downtown. The site is currently 17 acres of infill. Renderings reveals the biggest project for downtown Reno to date: 1,900 residences (condos, apartments with 20% affordable units for those making 80% of the median income), over 250,000 square feet of retail space, 450,000 square feet of office space, river access, three acres of green space, public art, and more. Thirty buildings could be built over the next ten years, with the first, a mixed-use commercial and residential building, at 235 Ralston. "The developers will take the unusual step of paying for $49 million in infrastructure and other services. If the project increases property taxes by $100 million over the next decade, the city will repay the cost; if it does not, the developers will," explained Nevada Public Radio. "Cities usually pay for infrastructure for redevelopment, but if property values, and therefore property taxes, don't rise in value as much as expected, the city loses money but must still make the bond payments for infrastructure improvements." More renderings below, and here is a look at prior Reno redevelopment projects, both unbuilt and realized. Don J Clark Group will now see whether Reno approves the $100 million deal.
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Ball-Nogues Hangs San Francisco’s Transamerica Pyramid From the Nevada Art Museum’s Ceiling

Things didn't work out for installation experts Ball-Nogues Studio at MOCA's New Sculpturalism show, but the firm has rebounded nicely. They've  just completed mounting one of their most ambitious works yet: a 70-foot-tall upside-down replica of William Pereira's Transamerica Pyramid, for the show Modernist Maverick: The Architecture of William Pereira, on view at the Nevada Art Museum in Reno, NV. The installation, made out of chain link and stainless steel plates, hangs from the ceiling via steel cables attached to the museum building's structure. "We distilled it to its barest essentials. It looks like the ghost of the building," said Ball-Nogues principal Gaston Nogues.  Each chain could only be attached at a specific point, so the hardest part was fine tuning the model, stretching and moving each possible iteration, added Nogues. "It's quite labor intensive to make sure it looked flat, and that each chain had the right tension," he said. The show, which opens next week, runs from through October 13. It  looks at many other noted Pereira projects, including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the University of California, San Diego Geisel Library, and the Theme Building at LAX.  
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On View> Edward Burtynsky: Oil at the Nevada Museum of Art

Edward Burtynsky: Oil Nevada Museum of Art, Feature Gallery South 160 West Liberty Street, Reno, NV Through September 23 One of the most important topics of our time, oil and its industry serve as the departure point for the work of one of the most admired photographers working today. From 1997 through 2009, Edward Burtynsky traveled the world chronicling oil, its production, distribution, and use. Through 50 large-scale photographs, Burtynsky illustrates stories about this vital natural resource, the landscapes altered by its extraction, and the sprawl caused by the development of infrastructure needed to transport it. Behind the awe-inspiring photography is an epic tale about the lifeblood of mankind's existence in the 21st century. Curated by the Center for Art + Environment, Oil forces the viewer to contend with the scale and implications of humanity’s addiction to energy.