Posts tagged with "Related":

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How architects are building a “soil sandwich” to keep plants from cooking at Hudson Yards’ rail-yard-topping Public Square

Building America’s largest private real estate development in history would be a tricky proposition whether or not it was taking shape over an active rail yard in the middle of the densest city in the country. But, of course, that is exactly where Hudson Yards—the mega development with those superlative bragging rights—is taking shape. To support the 17-million-square-foot project, Kohn Pedersen Fox (KPF), alongside Thornton Tomasetti, designed a massive steel platform (video below) that caps the rail yard allowing trains to move below and towers to rise into the Manhattan skyline. After years of failed attempts to build at the site, the project finally broke ground in 2012. Today, the platform is expanding horizontally and the first glass tower, also designed by KPF, is nearing completion. https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=35&v=PuxMfQ8UTG4 Planting a forest of skyscrapers above the rail yard has obviously required some engineering ingenuity, but planting an actual forest—or at least 200 trees—at Hudson Yards is no easy task task, either. To ensure that all of the trees, flowers, and plantings in Hudson Yards’ 4.5-acre “Public Square” flourish, landscape architecture firm Nelson Byrd Woltz had to solve a tricky equation of its own. Since the green space sits atop the new platform, the firm created a special soil to provide necessary drainage and nutrients for the plantings. There is also a “soil sandwich” of sand, gravel, and concrete slab to help trees’ roots expand horizontally. In the mix, plans also call for a rainwater collection system that will irrigate the space by pooling “every drop of rainwater that falls on the Hudson Yards Public Square". Er, maybe not every rain drop will be collected but we get the idea. There's another hidden challenge for sustaining plant life in the Public Square lurking just beneath the surface, as well: the heat rising from train tracks below. That heat, if left alone, would essentially cook the roots of any plants sitting above it. To keep the trees and plants comfortable, coolant is being pumped into the concrete slab. There are also 15 jet-engine-sized fans to further dissipate the heat. The site’s developers—Related and Oxford Properties Group—are celebrating the space as a great new public amenity (it’s right there in the name: Public Square). But while the space is open to the public and can be used for cultural events and movie screenings, it’s pretty clear that it is designed to be a money-maker for the development. The Hudson Yards’ website boasts that the Public Square can be used for “marquee events” like “signature product launches” and “brand installations.” You can also expect plenty of models during Fashion Week, which will relocate to the complex's Culture Shed. Speaking of money, the day after the Public Square plan was revealed by the developer, the Independent Budget Office projected that Hudson Yards will cost the city an additional $368 million through 2019, bringing the price tag for the entire project to $947 million, as reported by DNAinfo. The city has provided $3 billion in bonds for the project along with the 7 train extension that will service the site. Revenue from residential and commercial tenants at Hudson yards was supposed to offset the cost, but that hasn't happened just yet.
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Developers tap Perkins + Will principal to help redevelop site adjacent to Bertrand Goldberg’s River City

Plans for 2,700 new homes along the Chicago River have some neighbors and realtors calling a long-vacant lot near the Willis Tower by a new name. “River South” refers to a few sites, among them: a 7.3-acre riverside parcel between Harrison Street and the River City condo complex designed by Bertrand Goldberg. As Crain's Chicago Business reports, that's where developers CMK and Lend Lease are planning five towers with nearly 2,700 residential units, anchored by a 47-story building with 626 units. The developers tapped Perkins + Will principal Ralph Johnson to draft a master plan for the area. Whether or not the River South moniker sticks, the area has generated renewed interest from real estate watchers. Two other Chicago developers, D2 Realty and Phoenix Development Partners, have previously hinted at a large, mixed-use development on a 1.6 acre-parcel nearby. According to Crain's, developer Related Midwest is in talks to develop another 62-acre property at Roosevelt Road and the Chicago River.
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Can a Canadian Furniture Magnate Save Citi Bike?

Given the past few weeks of Citi Bike news, the events that played out over last weekend shouldn’t come as a surprise. But, alas, they do. Bixi— the bankrupt Montreal company behind Citi Bike's glitchy equipment—was purchased by, who else, a Canadian furniture magnate named Bruno Rodi. Yes, the man whose company sells living-room furniture and bills itself as the "spécialiste du sofa" will himself become the "spécialiste du vélo." Rodi's winning offer of about $3.6 million (US) was around $1.4 million less than a bid put together by Related and Equinox Fitness. But the higher offer was dismissed by a judge who ruled that it missed the deadline and didn't include the minimum deposit. So, what does Rodi plan to do with Bixi? That’s hard to answer because he’s not currently talking to the press. He's busy sailing around the Indian Ocean at the moment. Why? Because he’s a world traveler, that's why. He’s reportedly sailed every sea and visited nearly every World Heritage Site. And one time, he rode his bike along the entire route of the Tour de France. As problems mount for Citi Bike, the people at CitiGroup are pretty darn satisfied with their involvement in the program. Citi's head of creative and media for North America marketing, Elyssa Gray, recently said they're already seeing returns on their initial investment. [h/t The Atlantic Cities.]
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Scaled-back Lathrop Homes Redevelopment Plan Aims for Compromise

Its unique plan and handsome brown brick buildings landed the site on the National Register of Historic Places, but Chicago's Julia Lathrop Homes face an uncertain future. As hundreds of units sit vacant, tensions and expectations are high for this historic riverside housing project. Preservationists called foul on a redevelopment masterplan released last year, which they said shortchanged the 1938 development. Though Lathrop sidestepped outright demolition, the Homes south of Diversey Avenue would make way for new buildings under a new plan proposed by a development group led by Related Midwest. The scaled-back plan, Crain’s reports, calls for 1,208 residential units on the 32-acre property—504 market-rate units, 400 public-housing residences, 212 affordable homes and 92 for senior citizen public housing residents. It could include new mixed-use buildings at the intersection of Diversey, Clybourn, and Damen avenues. The plan, which also calls for a small park and 780 parking slots, will be the topic of discussion at a July 30 community meeting. The possibility of taller buildings at the southern end of the property has angered some area residents, who worry about development out of scale with the neighborhood, which includes parts of Logan Square, Lincoln Park, and North Center.
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Hudson Yards Update

Related and its confrere Oxford Properties today launched a new website for Hudson Yards, with some surprises. Followers of the down & dirty rail yard turned 12 million square foot urban Elysium may be forgiven if they have forgotten some of the details of the winning scheme—we sure did. And besides that was yesterday and a master plan. Still, of all the names dropped and found, bandied about and sprinkled on for good measure, we sure do not remember Werner Sobek as a major player. But there he is, featured in an exclusive article for REurope magazine. As the designer of a waffling web of a five-level, 750,000 square foot retail hub, the German engineer and architect will be author of a highly visible chunk of Phase One. Sobek was hired by master plan architect—aka in for the very long haul—Kohn Pedersen Fox. The developers envision the retail as a Time Warner Center meets Eataly kind of place. And Sobek, engineer designer of airports, bridges and assorted “widespans” as well as membranes in glass, metal and fabric is well up to the task with a tectonic shell that any trapeze artist could fall for.