Posts tagged with "Regen Projects":

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Theaster Gates showcases artworks at Regen Projects in Los Angeles

Regen Projects is currently showcasing new works by Chicago-based artist Theaster Gates in Los Angeles.
The exhibition, titled But To Be A Poor Race, uses painting to explore themes found within W.E.B. Du Bois's seminal book, The Souls of Black Folk. In the book, Du Bois uses essays to chronicle examples of exceptionalism within the African American community in an effort to humanize Black experiences during an era of segregation and racism. Du Bois's work is considered to be important both as a sociological exploration and a political text.
The paintings on display reinterpret statistical data presented in The Souls of Black Folk as abstract, geometric fields of color. The artist also uses sculpture—including a collection of sculptural objects, ephemera, and video artworks—to explore themes of Black experience, visual politics, and shamanism. Three of the works utilize bound copies of Jet magazines, a weekly digest focusing on important figures in the African American community that ran in print form from 1951 until 2014, to convey the lines of a long poem. Each of the works contains a stanza from the poem, with the three works arranged at eye level along the gallery walls so they can be read while walking.
In a press release for the exhibition, Gates describes the exhibition as an exploration of racialized poverty, saying, "But To Be A Poor Race questions a particular kind of poverty, one that is not just about a lack of economic capital but one that is deprived of the basic elements from which one can make a living."
In a work hearkening to contemporary political times, the exhibition also features a video titled My country tis of thee that depicts a musical performance of the song My Country 'Tis of Thee by Gates and musicians The Black Monks of Mississippi. In the video, the artists perform the patriotic song as both a sincere expression of patriotism and simultaneously as a work of satire. The exhibition is on view until February 25, 2017. For more information, see the Regen Projects website.
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Regen Projects sculpture exhibition fuses cars, mixed media, and music

Mexican artist Abraham Cruzvillegas’s Autoconcanción, a collection of new sculptures, is on display at Regen Projects in Los Angeles. The collection of eight autobiographical, mixed-media installations uses the backseats from cars Cruzvillegas has used throughout his life and augments them with various apparatuses—lifting some on spindly stilts and shading others behind iridescent sheets of backlit, colored plastic. To these objects, the artist attaches radios that play reports from local stations. Each piece also contains some sort of native plant specimen perched somewhere, such as a palm tree still in its nursery bucket or a collection of oak saplings like those typically seen in Southern California freeway medians. The work, meant to be a reflection on Cruzvillegas’s life through Southern California car culture, is reflected via the Mexico City–based artist’s title for the exhibition, which translates to “car with song.”

Autoconcanción Regen Projects 6750 Santa Monica Boulevard Los Angeles Through October 22

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Maltzan’s Revamped Regen Projects Brings Class To Hollywood

On Friday AN visited Michael Maltzan's new art space, Regen Projects, on Santa Monica Boulevard in Hollywood. The gallery, founded by Stuart Regen and Shaun Caley Regen, moved to its current gritty location from West Hollywood, and showcases artists like Doug Aitken, Catherine Opie, Andrea Zittel, Dan Graham, and Anish Kapoor. From the outside, the 20,000 square foot project resembles its own urbanscape, with stacked and staggered white boxes taking on the appearance of abstracted buildings in a skyline. Inside, light glows warmly into the main gallery through a system that Maltzan created in which the light from a long rooftop skylight is split via a metallic divider into two separate scrim-covered wells. A smaller gallery, whose light source is far away, takes on the appearance of a James Turrell skyspace. The second floor deck provides the perfect spot for art and sculpture, not to mention parties and openings. During our tour, the space proved an ideal nest from which to view the unexpected flight of Space Shuttle Endeavor across the state. More on this and other new LA galleries coming up in AN's next West Coast print issue.