Posts tagged with "Ray Kappe":

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The Broad-adjacent Otium opens with Damien Hirst on the menu

Otium, the restaurant tucked in The Broad’s Barouni olive-treed, 24,000-square-foot public plaza, quietly opened last week in Downtown Los Angeles. The sum of chef Otium Timothy Hollingsworth and restaurateur Bill Chait, a lot is riding on the eatery to enliven Grand Avenue and the Diller Scofidio + Renfro / Walter Hood pocket park. Designed by Studio UNTLD and House of Honey with building architect Osvaldo Maiozzi, Otium is a boxy, steel-and-wood-clad structure that owes more architecturally to midcentury mods like Craig Ellwood or Ray Kappe than to DS+R’s museum. The traditional California burring inside and outside drive the glazed walls and expansive patio seating. Farm-to-table ethos clearly is behind vertical gardens from Green City Farms on the restaurant’s rooftop that are ready to provide the chef with herbs, vegetables and edible flowers. Inside the box is a large dining room and open kitchen. Windows look west over Hope Street, a view rarely emphasized up on Bunker Hill. According to the press release, the designers were tasked to compliment Hollingsworth with “sophisticated rusticity,” a phrase that looks good on paper, but jams in the mouth creating a lisp-like noise that is neither. A bounty of natural materials are plentiful: steel, glass, wood, copper, stone, nubby textiles, and ceramics. Or, as the PR explains: “The design is an artful mix of old and new, honest, and refined, that echoes the menu’s offerings.” To link the restaurant to the museum, there’s an exterior mural in the works by artist Damien Hirst. Installed on the south facade and entitled Isolated Elements, 2015, it is an approximately 32-foot high by 84-foot long large-scale photograph based on his 1991 sculpture Isolated Elements Swimming in the Same Direction for the Purpose of Understanding, aka the shark in a tank of formaldehyde. It’s unclear if carnivorous seafood is on the menu.
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On View> Chicago’s Graham Foundation Presents “Everything Loose Will Land”

Everything Loose Will Land Graham Foundation 4 West Burton Place, Chicago Through July 26 Everything Loose Will Land explores the intersection of art and architecture in Los Angeles during the 1970s. The show’s title refers to a Frank Lloyd Wright quote that if you “tip the world over on its side and everything loose will land in Los Angeles.” This freeness alludes to the fact that this dislodging did not lead to chaos but rather a multidisciplinary artistic community that redefined LA. The exhibition features one hundred and twenty drawings, photographs, media works, sculptures, prototypes, models, and ephemera. The presentations function as a kind of archive of architectural ideas that connect a variety of disciplines. Projects by Carl Andre, Ed Moses, Peter Alexander, Michael Asher, James Turrell, Maria Nordman, Robert Irwin, Frank Gehry, Richard Serra, Coy Howard, Craig Ellwood, Peter Pearce, Morphosis, Bruce Nauman, Craig Hodgetts, Jeff Raskin, Ed Ruscha, Noah Purifoy, Paolo Soleri, Ray Kappe, Denise Scott Brown, Archigram, L.A. Fine Arts Squad, Bernard Tschumi, Eleanor Antin, Peter Kamnitzer, Cesar Pelli, Andrew Holmes, Elizabeth Orr, and others are explored. Curated by Sylvia Lavin, Director of Critical Studies in the Department of Architecture and Urban Design at UCLA, the show began its journey at the MAK Center for Architecture and then traveled to the Yale School of Architecture before arriving at the Graham Foundation.
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Leading West Coast Architects Celebrate DnA’s Relaunch in Santa Monica

On Monday, members of LA’s design and architecture cognoscenti descended on the Tesla store on Santa Monica’s Third Street Promenade to celebrate the official relaunch of KCRW’s DnA (Design and Architecture). The event featured a discussion between DnA host and executive producer Frances Anderton and Elon Musk, the visionary founder-CEO of Tesla and Space X. Those present included Michael Rotondi, Ray Kappe, Thom Mayne, developer Tom Gilmore, and Getty architecture curators Wim de Wit and Christopher Alexander. After ten years as a monthly on-air program, DnA will re-emerge as a more comprehensive weekly podcast and blog. To help curate what’s being billed as “DnA 2.0",  Anderton is enlisting the talents of local design journalists—or “DJs”—that she has hand-picked. “I’m thrilled that we will increase our coverage of, and participation in this creative community and the work that shapes our lives,” said Anderton. In the discussion Ms. Anderton honed in on Mr. Musk’s hands-on approach to design and innovation and how his operations are solidly based in California. “I like to be close enough to be involved,” he said. “With outsourcing, something we at one time considered, you lose the potential for innovation in the process.” Questions from the audience ranged from whether science fiction played a role in his work—“Definitely Asimov’s Foundation Trilogy and Heinlein”— to if he could solve LA’s traffic problem. “I’ve got a design for a double-decker freeway worked out,” he said. When a young member of the audience asked about flying cars, he thoughtfully responded that he thought the challenge wasn’t getting the cars to fly but in preventing them from crashing into everything. When asked if he had any advice for architects about getting more visionary buildings erected in Los Angeles, Mr. Musk demurred, saying “I wouldn’t presume to give advice. The problem isn’t the architects. We just need more clients here who want to put up visionary buildings.”
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Exploring Kappe in the Valley

The Southern California chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians (SAH) recently capped off a Ray Kappe-focused weekend with a home tour around Kappe’s many Sherman Oaks homes. As part of the series, The Architect's Newspaper got a chance to peek inside one of Kappe’s earliest works, the Dr. and Mrs. Robert Hayes House. Stepped far back from the street, the home is accessed only through a small path that one could easily miss among the rows of residential homes. The house was atypical of Kappe’s work, said historian Dana Hutt, but one can still see the beginnings of Kappe’s many architectural themes, including the aggressive opening of space, the blurring of inside and outside by continued elements and the complex layering of space. The four-bedroom, two-bath house has a simple triangular silhouette. Glass sliding doors and clerestory windows surround the house allowing ample light in. Wood beams from inside the home continue outdoors forming large eaves, through which filtered light easily cast over the outdoor patio. In its heyday of entertaining, the Hayes house would welcome up to forty guests, the owners adding space  by opening up one of the sliding partitions that flows right into a patio. “That patio was part of the house, not outside of it,” insisted Dr. Hayes, now retired from his work at UCLA. Inside, the space becomes more complex. A high ceiling over the living area is made more intimate with a lower frame over the kitchen and dining areas. Every part of the late 1950s home is used and very much lived in. Bookshelves are full of thick textbooks. Framed posters and paintings line the walls. On the living room mantle, a quaint box of handwritten recipes is still neatly filed, ready to be used at a moment’s notice. “As much as this house is Ray’s, this was also Alice’s,” said Dr. Hayes, referring to his deceased wife, who had closely collaborated with Kappe during the home’s construction in the late 50s. While driving along a stretch of West Los Angeles, it was Alice who spotted Kappe’s National Boulevard apartments. The design captured her imagination and when she arrived home, she told her husband, “Bob, I found him.” Him, being the architect of their new home. When asked how he felt about returning to the home after so many decades, Kappe in typical deadpan fashion replied, “It’s never good to revisit.” A grin lingered on his face, suggesting quite the opposite. While the row of trees fronting Sepulveda Boulevard has thinned—“This used to have better shading,” said the architect—the home has held up remarkably well through the years, even weathering the great Northridge earthquake.
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Architects Say the Darndest Things

If you've ever wanted to know more about LA's architects than the results of their projects in steel and stone, check out Success By Design by writer and photographer Jenn Kennedy. The book profiles 25 of them, including Steven Ehrlich, Barton Myers, Ray Kappe, the late Stephen Kanner, and Hodgetts + Fung. Architects divulge all sorts of secrets like Myers' insecurities about getting upstaged by students; Art Gensler's original desire to start a "small" firm (his firm, Gensler, has over 2,000 employees); Randy Peterson of HMC's amazing lack of free time; Kanner's struggles with fees; and Kappe's surprising facility with the business end of architecture. The book recently launched its digital version and a web site. See some interesting quotes below. "We don't enjoy going out to look for work just to have a design department do the work. We wanted to be involved in the project intimately. We're very detail oriented. It would be difficult for us to have five to ten projects going on at the same time, so we keep our staff size at ten to fifteen." -Ming Fung
"It's funny that everyone is embracing sustainability now, yet people were doing it five hundred years ago." -Steven Ehrlich
"Usually the principals in small firms—including mine—don't segregate themselves from the staff. the phone is in the middle of the room and you hear quite a bit." - Ray Kappe
"Many architects thought that interiors were beneath them, but I decided early on that I'd do it better than anyone else, and we did." -Art Gensler
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Kappe House Like You′ve Never Seen It

Could this be the future of architectural photography? The LA Times this weekend published a wonderful virtual tour of Ray Kappe's own house on a heavily wooded lot in the Palisades. Thanks to huge glass walls, skylights, clerestories, floating interior planes and cantilevered wooden decks, trellises and platforms, the house appears to float over its sloping site. It's truly one of the most spectacular houses ever built. And the tours of its facade, main room, kitchen, and deck do it more justice than any two dimensional pictures could. Now if only Kappe could get more props himself. When is he gonna win a Pritzker already?
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Eavesdrop CA 08

REVEALING BITS Stephen Ehrlich is known to be a mild-mannered LA architect. But it looks like that wasn’t always so. As part of his tribute at Julius Shulman’s memorial service in September, Ehrlich bared not only his praise for Shulman, but also his butt cheeks. He wasn’t at the event, but the Getty presented an image that Shulman took of him in his—shall we say—perkier days. He was obviously hitting the beach a lot then, because we saw some serious tan lines. Uncle Julius, maybe you had another career waiting in the centerfolds? YOUR PINK SLIPS ARE SHOWING The layoffs continue unabated. But it’s even more painful when the firm doing the layoffs just bought your company. Our always (well, almost-always) reliable sources tell us that architecture giant Perkins + Will has just laid off more than 25 people in its San Francisco office. Around ten of them are former employees of SF firm SMWM, which merged with Perkins + Will about a year ago. Guess that M&A plan wasn’t such a good idea, was it? EASY LISTENING The gossip goldmine that is the Monterey Design Conference has delivered yet again. ... Send tips, gossip, and job fairs to Eavesdrop@archpaper.com
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So Long SCI-Arc

"I hadn't even heard about it," Ray Kappe told us when we called him to find out about an item in Curbed the other day noting that the Santa Monica City Council had overturned a ruling by the Landmarks Commission that would have designated SCI-Arc's original home as a historical icon worthy of preservation. Kappe, who founded the school in 1972 at a 1950s industrial building at 3030-3060 Nebraska Avenue [map], actually sided with the council in its decision, calling the building "messed up completely." He said it used to sport "a pretty good 30s modern look. It had good character, but now it's got dumb character." That's because at one point the landlord replaced the ribbon windows with generics, among other changes. According to Curbed, "The city's Landmarks Commission made the site a landmark in February 2008 based on its relationship with SCI-Arc and Kappe, its reflection of the neighborhood's development, and its architectural merits, which include what the Commission's action says is a 'late Bauhaus, mid-century fenestration pattern.'" But now, the council has overturned that decision because, according to a staff report, "The structure is a common example of a utilitarian, vernacular industrial building that has been significantly altered. It is not unique in design or rare architecturally." With appeal in hand, Curbed speculates new owners NMS Properties are going to build apartments on the site, which Kappe thought was a fine idea. "The building was good and it served its purpose, but I don't think it should stand in the way of somebody's development," he said. Might we suggest a certain Southern California architect educator for the job of building NMS' new apartments?