Posts tagged with "Quinn Evans Architects":

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ASH NYC makes Detroit’s Wurlitzer Building sing again

The Siren Hotel 1509 Broadway Street Detroit Tel: 313-277-4736 Designer: ASH NYC After thirty-five years of vacancy and deterioration, Detroit’s Wurlitzer Building is making sweet music in Motown again. The Siren Hotel, recently opened inside the svelte historic terra-cotta building, is the work of ASH NYC, a firm premised on bridging the worlds of interior design and property development. ASH NYC simultaneously acts as designer, developer, owner, and operator of the hotel, and, with assistance from Quinn Evans Architects (QEA), has restored many of the building’s 1926 features, including travertine floors and plaster ceilings. Each of The Siren’s 106 guest rooms features items designed and fabricated by ASH NYC, as well as custom woven blankets by Cranbrook Academy of Art graduate students. The former home of pianos, jukeboxes, and organs boasts six distinctive food and beverage outlets, including Albena, an eight-seat chef’s counter with James Beard nominee Garrett Lipar offering a tasting menu inspired by the Great Lakes, and Sid Gold’s Request Room, a piano karaoke bar. The interior of Candy Bar, the hotel’s opulent cocktail lounge, evokes the sweet pink beaded gowns worn by The Supremes.
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Ten Finalists Selected for Renovation of Mies-Designed MLK Memorial Library in DC

Out of a crop of 26, ten teams have been invited to present their technical proposals for the renovation of the Mies van der Rohe–designed Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library in Washington, D.C. District officials are hoping to transform the landmark 1972 building, Mies’ last built work and his only in D.C., into a state-of-the-art central library fit for the nation’s capital. The finalists are Cunningham Quil Architects and 1100 Architects, Ennead Architects and Marshall Moya Architects, Leo A. Daly and Richard Bauer, Martinez and Johnson Architects and Mecanoo Architects, OMA and Quinn Evans Architects, Patkua Architects and Ayer Saint Gross, REX and Davis Carter Scott Architects, Shalom Baranes and Davis Brody Bond, Skidmorw Owings & Merill, and Studios Architecture and The Freelon Group. With the library’s plumbing, HVAC and elevator systems in need of replacement, asbestos present throughout the building, and annual maintenance costs soaring to $5 million, the aging athenaeum demands some serious work. Library officials have given their chosen architects a few different options, from a simple update of the building’s ailing systems, to construction of two additional floors or a complete gutting the interior. Either way, the transformation is scheduled to wrap up by 2018.
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1970s Benjamin Franklin Museum Re-Opens as High-Tech Biographical Exhibit

The Benjamin Franklin Museum at Independence National Historical Park (INHP) in Philadelphia has bid adieu to the 1970s. Closed by the National Park Service (NPS) for a $23 million, two-year renovation, the historic site has re-opened as an 8,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art facility to learn about the “relevant revolutionary.” Quinn Evans Architects (QEA) was tasked with renovating the original 1976 underground museum designed by Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown (VSBA). The museum now involves interactive displays, personal artifacts, and a glass pavilion, also known as the ghost house, operating as the main entrance from Franklin Court. While VSBA’s "ghost house" pavilion remains largely untouched, one major change consists of the new entry building, which replaces heavy brick walls with a ground floor facade of “fritted glass,” a pattern created from photographs of the original pavilion’s brick wall. Slate floors replace burnt orange-tiled passageways. The firm has also designed a large “View Window” to engage visitors with the ghost house, a steel structure outlining Franklin’s vanished residence and print shop. While recognizing that the museum could benefit from an update and the expanded entry pavilion might be needed to accommodate roughly 250,000 annual visitors, Scott Brown was not thrilled that VSBA was not asked to carry out the project. When the project began, AN reported that Doris Fanelli, chief of INHP’s Division of Cultural Resources Management, contended that the NPS selected QEA from a pre-approved list because the venture was progressing quickly. Although confronted with reluctance from architectural scholars to alter the postmodern icon, NPS did not approach VSBA, who was not on the list. In a letter, VSBA wrote that more offensive is how the alterations rework the museum entry experience, which resembled former urban planner Edmund Bacon’s greenway plan for Society Hill.  
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Detroit’s Most Famous Ruin to be Reborn?

Detroit’s most famous ruin, Michigan Central Depot, may soon see new life. Workers for the billionaire Maroun family have been clearing debris out of the 18-story building and a feasibility study for reusing the building is underway. Ann Arbor-based Quinn Evans Architects are among those working on the study. “Structurally, the building is very sound. What's different now from (previous attempts) is the momentum—the group of people behind this effort as well as the outreach to a wide group," principal Elisabeth Kibble, told the Detroit News. Local politicians, foundation leaders, and officials from the Detroit Institute of the Arts were recently given a tour of the space. New York-based developer Scott Griffin is working with the Marouns to find possible new uses for the building.