Posts tagged with "Pulitzer Foundation":

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Pulitzer Foundation to reprise PXSTL design-build competition for empty lot in St. Louis

The Pulitzer Foundation in St. Louis will reprise its PXSTL competition, which last year brought an airy, steel-framed pavilion courtesy of Freecell Architecture to the empty lot across the street from the Tadao Andodesigned arts institution. Like last year, PXSTL will be a national design-build competition culminating in a temporary structure on the lot across Washington Avenue from the Pulitzer Foundation. Over a six-month period in the summer of 2017, the winning pavilion will host a series of programs and events organized by the Foundation in collaboration with the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis. The winning designers, who will be announced in the spring of 2016, will collaborate with the Pulitzer and a team of graduate students from the Sam Fox School to realize the structure, according to a press release published Tuesday. The installation will follow the opening of a new addition to the museum designed by Ando, which includes 3,700 square feet of new gallery space. (Read AN’s Q&A with Tadao Ando here.) The acronym PXSTL stands for the Pulitzer, the Sam Fox School, and St. Louis—a moniker the Pulitzer's press material says “underscores the lot as a site of intersection for the two institutions and the city, united by a common goal to encourage revitalization through design.”
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Friday> Freecell & Pulitzer Foundation turn a vacant lot in St. Louis into a parade of public programs

Last year, a vacant lot across the street from the Pulitzer Foundation in St. Louis became the site of a design competition for a temporary built-environment installation. New York’s Freecell Architecture won PXSTL's $50,000 project budget and $10,000 honorarium for a proposal to erect an adjustable canopy for performances and gatherings—an idea Kristina Van Dyke, director of the Pulitzer Foundation, called “both monumental and ephemeral at the same time.” Freecell’s installation, entitled Lots, opens Friday, May 9. An opening celebration from 7:00 to 9:00p.m. will include a dance performance by students at the Grand Center Arts Academy, which will be connected to the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum by free shuttle bus for the evening. Through October 5, Lots will occupy the space across Washington Avenue from the Pulitzer Foundation, an elegant concrete building designed by Tadao Ando. (Read AN’s Q&A with Tadao Ando here.) Public programs will take over the canopy throughout the summer, funded by grants from the foundation. Thirteen grant recipients will provide programming for the inaugural PXSTL installation. See PXSTL's website for more information about the opening event, which is also sponsored by the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts at Washington University.
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Colloquium to Revisit the Building of Tadao Ando’s Pulitzer Foundation in St. Louis

Tadao Ando's architecture strives for perfection, with glass-smooth concrete walls nearly as reflective as mirrors, ideal proportion and geometry creating a sacred sense of space, and design details that reveal no part of a building is too small for consideration. In fact, as one story goes, Ando requested that a foot-thick concrete wall at his Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts in St. Louis be rebuilt multiple times since it didn't meet his strict standards. The Pulitzer, one of only a handful of buildings the Japanese architect has completed in the United States and the first in the US intended for public use, opened in 2001, demurely set behind a concrete wall in the city's Grand Center neighborhood. This Friday and Saturday (February 8 and 9), the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts and Washington University in St. Louis are hosting the free Building Pulitzer colloquium looking back at the four-year construction period of Ando's Pulitzer Foundation. According to Liane Hancock, architecture professor at Louisiana Tech University and co-organizer of Building Pulitzer, "The goal of the colloquium is to reveal how a building designed by an internationally recognized architect is actually brought to fruition." Multiple events taking place at Ando's Pulitzer Foundation and at the Fumihiko Maki-designed Steinberg Auditorium at Washington University will consider the Pulitzer's design and four-year construction process. Hancock continued:
Tadao Ando asked for one simple thing—that the local designers and contractors give their personal best to the project. As the team learned more and more how to meet the challenges of the building, their personal best continuously improved. What is pretty amazing is how both the architects of record and the contractors both talk about the environment that was built to encourage collaboration, problem solving, and innovation to meet the tolerances that Ando requested.
A number of events are planned, including a tour of the Pulitzer on Friday and a series of lectures and discussions by architecture professors Liane Hancock, Eric Hoffman of Washington University, Emily Rauh Pulitzer, and others. A keynote lecture on Friday, "Collaboration and Inovation Outside of Japan," will be delivered by Masataka Yano, associate at Tadao Ando Architect & Associates and project architect for the Pulitzer. Topics at the Building Pulitzer colloquium include:
  • the working structure between Tadao Ando’s team and the St. Louis team (“Working with Osaka”)
  • the realization of Ando’s design through unique methods of construction (“Translating Design Intent: Developing Means and Methods”)
  • the development of a work environment that fostered construction excellence (“Personal Best: Creating a Receptive Environment for Construction Excellence”)
Professor Liane Hancock and Steve Morby, facilities and construction manager at the Pulitzer, are in the process of writing a book, also called Building Pulitzer, that will include information from the colloquium and interviews with Morby and other key players in the building of the Pulitzer. Building Pulitzer is free and open to the public. More information and a schedule of events can be found at Washington University in St. Louis.