Posts tagged with "Project Projects":

Pioneering exhibitions that changed architecture and design

For addressing what some consider to be an extremely niche topic, As Seen: Exhibitions that Made Architecture and Design History makes a convincing argument for the importance of exhibitions in broader design. While the book may not convince those who are already skeptical of the role of exhibition in the design fields, those who are at all interested will find it an invaluable resource for understanding historical and contemporary exhibition practices. Using 11 benchmark exhibitions, editor Zoë Ryan builds a conversation between a number of today’s most noted curators, architects, designers, and academics through a series of essays. The end result is a brief critical history of historic and contemporary exhibitions that changed the way architecture and design are understood. Ryan, the John H. Bryan Chair and curator of architecture and design at the Art Institute of Chicago, opens the book with an argument for each of the exhibitions and their places in history. These exhibitions include: This is Tomorrow (1956), the IBM Pavilion at the New York World’s Fair (1964), aper22 (1970), Italy: The New Domestic Landscape (1972), Man Transforms (1976), Memphis (1981), Droog (1993), Mutant Materials in Contemporary Design (1995–97), Massive Change: The Future of Global Design (2004– 06), Sense of the City: An Alternate Approach to Urbanism (2005), and Super Normal: Sensations of the Ordinary (2007). The remainder of the book is divided up into sections covering the exhibitions themselves, their catalogs, their critical reception, and thoughts on their lasting impact on the design fields. Interestingly, as is pointed out multiple times in the text, many of these exhibitions were not necessarily popular or critically successful when they were first on show. This is Tomorrow, which was shown at the Whitechapel Art Gallery (now the Whitechapel Gallery) in London, was covered extensively by the press, and called everything from confusing to exciting. Memphis—which ran in what would now be called a collateral gallery, located at the edge of the Salone del Mobile in Milan—caused a stir among critics and designers alike, some feeling like the show was some sort of media stunt to elevate the career of Ettore Sottsass. Notably, there are no photographs of the Memphis show. The IBM Pavilion structure, designed by Eero Saarinen and Roche Dinkeloo was not altogether loved, but the interior exhibition, Think, produced by Ray and Charles Eames, received rave reviews and a constant stream of visitors. In all cases, the book lays out why we should care about these shows today, despite or thanks to their initial reception. It is carefully pointed out early in the book that the most recent show was over ten years ago, in order to maintain a critical distance from early reactions. Even with this distance, the book does bring some of the shows in very close with its choice of contributors. In more than one case, curators from the shows covered are given a chance to comment on the larger topic of exhibitions, if not their own work. Mirko Zardini outlines (in a text originally published in Log 20) what it means to show architectural work in Montreal, where his show Sense of the City was exhibited at the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA). Paola Antonelli talks more directly about the role of digital content and how it relates to her show Mutant Materials, which was the first show at the Museum of Modern Art to be accompanied by a website. A prevailing theme throughout the essays, if not the book as a whole, is the changing nature and role of exhibitions throughout time. Sylvia Lavin discusses the allure of contemporary exhibitions thanks to their blend of demonstration (full-scale architecture-artifacts), aesthetics (design as art), and information, all of which developed in design and architectural exhibitions in stops and starts in the past century. Meredith Carruthers dedicates an essay to the exhibition catalogs, another topic that pops up throughout the book. Stepping back even further from the exhibitions themselves, Penelope Dean and Alice Rawsthorn specifically discuss the changing shape of design criticism in the form of exhibition reviews over time. The physical book, designed by Project Projects, is appropriately reminiscent of a museum catalog. Highly stylized graphic design, rich imagery, and bold use of multiple paper stocks and colors make it an artifact in itself, an idea discussed extensively in the text about catalogs. This is doubly fitting, as the genesis of the book was a research project conducted by Ryan and displayed at the 2014 Istanbul Design Biennial and eventually as a show at the Art Institute. While not actually a catalog of that show, the meta idea of a book about an exhibition about exhibitions seems fitting for the topic, more so than a simple catalog. As Seen is not for everybody. Those who believe that the field of architecture and design is most importantly a professional one will likely find the conversation about long over exhibitions esoteric if not unnecessary. This book is not for them, though. For those who are interested in the expression of theoretical and avant-garde design concepts through exhibitions (which seems to be a growing number, considering the recent explosion of biennales and triennials around the world), As Seen: Exhibitions that Made Architecture and Design History is the closest thing to a textbook on the subject. As Seen: Exhibitions that Made Architecture and Design History Zoë Ryan Art Institute of Chicago, $30.49

The Art Institute of Chicago explores the last half-century’s most influential architecture exhibits

Presented as a show about shows, As Seen: Exhibitions That Made Architecture and Design History contains materials and imagery from 11 group design and architecture exhibitions from 1956 to 2006. Along with the material, critical and scholarly discourse from each show’s time gives insight into the discussion surrounding the show and the discipline when the work was originally presented. As Seen is a small part of a larger line of inquiry that was initiated as part of the Istanbul Design Biennial 2014. Designed by New York-based exhibition and identity design practice Project Projects, As Seen is sponsored by the Architecture & Design Society. The show was originally curated by Zoë Ryan for the 2014 Istanbul Design Biennial. The Art Institute iteration of the exhibition has been curated by Zoë Ryan, Meredith Caruthers, and Karen Kice.

As Seen: Exhibitions That Made Architecture and Design History is on view through August 15th at the Art Institute of Chicago.

Ten Teams Shortlisted for HUD’s Rebuild by Design Competition

In response to Hurricane Sandy, the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) launched the Rebuild by Design competition to develop strategies to increase the resiliency of urban and coastal areas in the face of extreme weather events and climate change. According to HUD's website, the goal of the competition is "to promote innovation by developing regionally-scalable but locally-contextual solutions that increase resilience in the region, and to implement selected proposals with both public and private funding dedicated to this effort. The competition also represents a policy innovation by committing to set aside HUD Community Development Block Grant Disaster Recovery funding specifically to incentivize implementation of winning projects and proposals. Examples of design solutions are expected to range in scope and scale—from large-scale green infrastructure to small-scale residential resiliency retrofits." The shortlist of 10 teams—including architects, landscape architects, university groups, developers, engineers and others—has been announced. Interboro Partners with the New Jersey Institute of Technology Infrastructure Planning Program; TU Delft; Project Projects; RFA Investments; IMG Rebel; Center for Urban Pedagogy; David Rusk; Apex; Deltares; Bosch Slabbers; H+N+S; and Palmbout Urban Landscapes. PennDesign/OLIN with PennPraxis, Buro Happold, HR&A Advisors, and E-Design Dynamics WXY architecture + urban design / West 8 Urban Design & Landscape Architecture with ARCADIS Engineering and the Stevens Institute of Technology, Rutgers University; Maxine Griffith; Parsons the New School for Design; Duke University; BJH Advisors; and Mary Edna Fraser. OMA with Royal Haskoning DHV; Balmori Associaties; R/GA; and HR&A Advisors. HR&A Advisors with Cooper, Robertson, & Partners; Grimshaw; Langan Engineering; W Architecture; Hargreaves Associates; Alamo Architects; Urban Green Council; Ironstate Development; Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation; New City America. SCAPE Landscape Architecture with Parsons Brinckerhoff; SeARC Ecological Consulting; Ocean and Coastal Consultants; The New York Harbor School; Phil Orton/Stevens Institute; Paul Greenberg; LOT-EK; and MTWTF. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Center for Advanced Urbanism and the Dutch Delta Collaborative with ZUS; De Urbanisten; Deltares; 75B; and Volker Infra Design. Sasaki Associates with Rutgers University and ARUP. Bjarke Ingels Group with One Architecture; Starr Whitehouse; James Lima Planning & Development; Green Shield Ecology; Buro Happold; AEA Consulting; and Project Projects. unabridged Architecture with Mississippi State University; Waggoner and Ball Architects; Gulf Coast Community Design; and the Center for Urban Pedagogy.

Extended! Past Futures, Present, Futures Lengthens its Stay at Storefront for Art & Architecture

Past Futures, Present Futures Storefront for Art and Architecture 97 Kenmare Street Gallery open Tuesday to Saturday, 11:00pm-6:00pm Through January 12, 2013 Lucky you! The Storefront for Art & Architecture has extended the run of one of their most ambitious exhibitions to date, Past Futures, Present, Futures. Thanks to a spectacular design by LEONG LEONG, the modest proportions of the gallery seem to expand through both space and time. Visitors enter a pleasantly disorienting limbo by stepping from the street through a shimmering wall of silver vertical blinds. The exhibition, which has been extended through January 12, 2013, is divided into several "rooms" where part one of the show—101 unrealized past visions for New York, i.e."past futures"—is broken down and re-presented in a highly experiential way, through collections of images, of sound, and of contextual details (just flip over one of the blinds to reveal a dense info panel). Layered on top of these are past futures are visions for "present futures" by 101 invited architects and designers, including many young New York firms, making it entirely possible to find a Buckminster Fulller scheme next to one by SO-IL. The non-chronological, non-linear show curated by Storefront director Eva Franch with fellows Chialin Chou and Greg Barton is completely open to interpretation. In fact, visitors are even invited to add their own urban visions to the mix (just fill out one of the forms designed by Project Projects and stick it to a swaying blind). The show will continue to evolve as it enters other media, including an interactive website and a publication.

Building for Brussels, at Project Projects March 11

Presidential candidate Mitt Romney has been attacking Barack Obama lately for trying to bring European Social Democracy to this country. A new book on 44 urban transformation projects in European Union makes us wish "if only!" The book details some well known projects—the Novartis campus in Basel, the new Bilbao Metro, and Strasbourg's car park by Zaha Hadid architects—but it also features many lesser known projects that make Europe seem like the most interesting testing ground for transforming aging cities into new livable ones. Developed from a 2010 exhibition by Architecture Workroom Brussels, the book does not have a distributor in this country, so we are loathe to review,  but it turns out that the book is designed by New York City-based Project Projects, and they are hosting a launch of the book on Sunday, March 11 from 4-6pm at their office at 161 Bowery on the second floor.