Posts tagged with "Product Design":

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Michael Graves and Landscape Forms create a new “courtscape” for the US Open

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the US Open, Michael Graves Architecture & Design (MGA&D) teamed up with Landscape Forms to redesign the courtside furniture that takes center stage during the upcoming two-week tournament. The United States Tennis Association (USTA) unveiled its sleek new “courtscape” earlier this week at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadow, Queens.   The new furniture, a collection featuring seating for the players, umpires, and line judges, as well as a “cooler corral,” is part of the US Open’s major rebranding effort. Not only were the designs created to maximize ease of use for those on the court, they speak to the organization’s goal of making a modern, iconic look for the tournament and its New York location. Before crafting the collection, MGA&D met with everyone involved in the US Open from players to officials, fans, sponsors, broadcast partners, and tech crews. Through their research, the design team concluded that the furniture must address three primary goals: visibility, usability, and functionality. As inspiration for the design, they took nods from the landscape of New York City such as its park benches (seen in the player’s seating) and the cantilevered balconies found on buildings (seen on the umpire stand). MGA&D used virtual reality technology to help USTA stakeholders realize their vision. The team then worked with Michigan-based Landscape Forms, who specializes in high-design site furniture and advanced LED lighting, on the engineering and manufacturing of the collection. The group’s custom division, Studio 431, created seating products with thin profiles and graceful curves using perforated steel and aluminum surfaces as the primary materials. These lightweight but durable products are now prominently featured on four of the show courts at the tennis center in Queens. Donald Strum, MGA&D principal of product design, helped lead the project. He said this unique opportunity to create a courtscape for the USTA was one of the most satisfying projects he’s ever worked on. “Seating should express utility, be comfortable, and carry a beautiful personality as well,” said Strum in a statement. “The various performance requirements of this collection made the project endlessly fascinating.” All the courts at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center will be outfitted with the new furniture next year ahead of the 2019 championship.  
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Here are 5 new fixtures that solve common lighting problems

These new architectural fixtures answer the specific needs of a space across myriad typologies—including a system that is adaptable for multiuse spaces,  a projector that emits both diffused and direct light, and an LED bulb that supports circadian rhythms.

Vektor Linea Light Group

Linea Light Group installed Vektor in the exhibition rooms at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris (shown above). Vektor’s light beam becomes progressively softer toward the artworks’ borders and frames, creating the effect that the objects are emerging from the shadows.

Riff Olle Lundberg for ateljé Lyktan

Resembling a hockey puck, this fixture is outfitted with an interchangeable cast aluminum screen. Both wall and ceiling fixtures are available in black and white.

Sharp Recessed Carlotta de Bevilacqua for Artemide

Sharp was designed for precision with an optical system that creates highly uniform light. The fixture pairs polynomial LEDs with a geometric screen, a combination that prevents multiple shadows and diffused spotlights.

Cielo-Terra Studiocharlie for De Padova

This thin adjustable pole is outfitted with two light sources that can be operated separately. A single linear fixture can illuminate intimate spaces or be used in multiple for larger areas.

Good Day LED Bulb Lighting Science

Using technology developed in collaboration with NASA, Lighting Science created a light source that supports circadian rhythms. The LED bulbs create the effect of direct natural light in environments where it might otherwise be limited or, worse, completely unavailable.

    [SPONSORED] Maglin Add color to your Spring collection. Energize your indoor or outdoor space with a splash of color
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“Humanscale,” the iconic design manual, will be reprinted

Long before computers and advanced software were available, designers and architects relied on the Humanscale manuals, a set of three booklets that sought to help designers create ergonomic products using human-centered methodology and measurements. It’s every product designer’s dream—a design Bible if you will.

Graphic standard manuals from the 1970s have been all the rage lately. While manuals such as these have been out of print for decades, their scarcity and high demand lead to extremely high prices on sites like eBay—one collectible Humanscale manual is selling for $1,180 on Amazon.

Now, Chicago-based design consultancy firm IA Collaborative is looking to bring Humanscale back through Kickstarter, for an affordable price.

The reprinted version comes in a set of three booklets and nine selectors—rotatable, circular discs that contain more than 60,000 ergonomic and human-factor data bits concerning attributes like age, height, strength, and ability level. Choosing one data parameter will correspond to other parameters (for example, choosing age 12 will show you the appropriate leg room range).

“All products–from office chairs to medical devices—require designs that ‘fit’ the end user,” IA Collaborative Design Engineering Director Luke Westra said in a press release.
Other human factor datasets like seating standards, wheelchair access guidelines, and other metrics needed for designing human-centric products and spaces are included. As a comprehensive and consolidated analog guide, Humanscale is perhaps most useful as a starting point for designers to approximate size and scale, before moving onto further design stages.

The manuals were originally produced by design firm Henry Dreyfuss Associates, the designers behind iconic products like the Polaroid camera and the tabletop telephone. Its founder, Henry Dreyfuss, is one of the early pioneers of ergonometric design and prioritized data as a measurement for design.

The Kickstarter project is well past its $137,800 goal, and certain "early bird" offers are no longer offered. However, the reprinted versions are still available at $79 per individual booklet or $199 for the entire set.

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WantedDesign’s founders on can’t-miss events for architects at this year’s show

WantedDesign 2017 will kick off its seventh year during NYCxDESIGN on May 17. Each year, WantedDesign puts on a series of workshops, launches, conversations, and events to bring together designers of different disciplines and backgrounds. The weeklong event is split between Manhattan and Brooklyn, a move made in 2015 to acknowledge Brooklyn’s growing influence in the design community. To continue growing WantedDesign Brooklyn, a new event was added this year, WANTED Career Day, which will provide young designers opportunities to network with professionals, companies, manufacturers, and brands. WantedDesign Brooklyn will start off the week of festivities at Industry City in Sunset Park on May 17, with WantedDesign Manhattan kicking off on May 20 at the Terminal Stores building in West Chelsea. Both events will conclude on May 23. In anticipation of WantedDesign, The Architect’s Newspaper spoke with its co-founders Odile Hainaut and Claire Pijoulat about what architects can expect at WantedDesign and what they hope the event will do for the design community. The Architect’s Newspaper: WantedDesign focuses a lot on connectivity: designers to manufacturers, students to professionals, U.S. designers to international designers, etc. Are you hoping to forge a long-lasting difference in how different professions in the design world work together? Odile and Claire: Absolutely. We strongly believe that great ideas [and] great projects come from great people from diverse backgrounds working together. We build [on this] year after year…and this is certainly the most interesting part of what we are doing: building solid and long lasting exchanges, resulting in sustainable and long-term collaborations. Speaking of connectivity, how do you see architects and product designers working together in the future and pushing design forward?  Architects and product designers are definitely two different “families,” even if there is more and more crossover and architects going to products and vice versa. There is certainly a specific learning and skills needed for each activity, and one can’t replace the other, but working together is a great thing and for sure pushes design forward. The WANTED Career Day is a new event this year. What led you to start this event? What are you hoping will come out of this for the candidates and recruiters involved? May is the time [that brings into] town all professionals, established names of the industry, as well as freshly graduated students starting their creative career and dreaming about meeting those professionals. We have this mix at WantedDesign of established and young talents and design schools… we are committed to supporting young creatives. All year long, we [had] companies telling us they are looking to hire and are desperate to find good candidates. We thought it was just bon sens to organize this, and also feel that’s part of our responsibility, and part of NYCxDESIGN’s mission to facilitate job opportunities. Our goal is certainly to make good “matches,” and to organize a new Career Day during the year, and certainly in May 2018. How do you see events like WantedDesign influencing the design community and sparking innovation? We offer a platform that is very different from any other design fair or trade shows, offering manufacturers and designers a place for creative and storytelling installations, that very often offer different approaches, visions, or capabilities. We certainly propose a new way to inspire and connect people that is more engaging [and] more exciting. We envision WantedDesign more as a design forum and not just a place to launch products…. Equally, [it’s] a place to share ideas [and] engage meaningful conversations and collaborations. Maybe the way we influence the design community is in emphasizing the quality of the relationships and in building a valuable and rich network. For visitors coming to WantedDesign from an architecture background, what would you say is the most interesting event(s) for them to attend? We will very much [be] focusing and talking about well-being and about [the] responsibility that comes with design and production. [A] few great installations to look at specifically for architects at WantedDesign Manhattan this year: Mohawk Group, Wolf Gordon, and certainly 3M presenting the latest innovative materials/surface collection. The Wanted Interiors /Creative Life Space presented by Sony Life Space UX will be really interesting as well. That’s a new program that we are particularly enthusiastic to launch this year. It reflects our search for [a] new way for our visitors, and in particular architects, to discover products and possible application, interpretation, and transformation. [A] few not to be missed talks at WantedDesign Manhattan for this audience: Saturday, May 20, 2pm-3pm – “Designing for Movement” – Conversation Room at Grimshaw. Moderated by Susan S. Szenasy, Publisher/Editor in Chief, Metropolis Magazine, with Randy Fiser, chief executive officer, American Society of Interior Designers, Joseph White, director of workplace strategy, design, and management, Herman Miller, Anastasia Su, co-founder and creative director of 13&9 and Martin Lesjak, co-founder and creative director of 13&9 and CEO of INNOCAD Architecture. Sunday, May 21, 2pm-3pm – 2017 Color + Design Vision – At Mohawk Gallery. Join Royce Epstein, director of design segment for Mohawk Group, as she presents the 2017 forecast of color and design trends. This inspirational lecture looks at how cultural shifts affect design, and how trends today impact design across multiple disciplines to create a new visual language. One talk to put on the calendar as well at WantedDesign Brooklyn: Thursday, May 18, 6pm-8pm – Adapt & Reuse: New approaches for recycling Urban Fabric. A discussion presented by WantedDesign and New Practice New York AIA NY with David van der Leer, Van Alen Institute, Daniel Pittman, design director, A/D/O, Thomas McKnight, executive vice president, planning, development & transportation, NYC EDC, and Andrew Kimball, CEO, Industry City. Moderated by Carol Loewenson, FAIA, partner at Mitchell | Giurgola Architects, with special guests Stacey Anderson and Karen Zabarsky of MakerPark. For more information about the events going on at WantedDesign or for tickets, visit the WantedDesign website here.
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For the Birds> Michael Graves’ last design for Alessi updated his Bird Kettle with a dragon

The last project Michael Graves completed for Alessi references one of his earliest creations for the company: The 9093 kettle, better known as the Bird Teakettle. To mark the thirtieth anniversary of the iconic piece, the late architect designed a new component for what's being called the Tea Rex kettle. In January 2015, Graves explained the development of this update. "In bird years, thirty is equivalent to Methuselah's life span!" Graves said, describing his new design for the Dragon Whistle. "So when Alberto Alessi asked me to design a new whistle to celebrate the 30th Anniversary of our teakettle, I imagined a new evolution in the history of our kettle. One where our little bird might transform into a super-hero: a reptilian creature that is at once prehistoric, mythological, and futuristic." "I chose the dragon imagery and its jade green color because of the rich cultural heritage found in Chinese folklore that uses the dragon to symbolize power and good luck," Graves said. "Our dragon is friendly and he decidedly does not breathe fire, but perhaps lets off a little steam! He has a smile on his face, an easy-to-hear whistle, and a wing span that makes it easy to remove him from our teakettle when the water boils. We hope our dragon will proudly protect our kettle and your kitchen for years to come." Two versions of Tea Rex are offered: one with a jade green whistle and one—a limited edition of 9,999—with a brass, metallic-finish whistle.
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On View> “Marc Newson: At Home” Opens on November 23 at The Philadelphia Museum of Art

Nearly three decades after he was launched into design stardom by his biomorphic, aluminum Lockhead Lounge (above), famed Australian industrial designer Marc Newson will soon receive his first solo museum exhibition in the United States. Presented by the Philadelphia Museum of Art, "Marc Newson: At Home" will collect furniture, clothing, appliances, and Newsons’ 021C Ford concept car within a mock, six-room home in the museum’s Collab Gallery. Gathered from collections across Europe, Japan, and the United States, in addition to Newson’s personal cache, the objects on display will highlight the various facets of the designer’s distinctive style of flowing lines, bulbous forms, bright colors, and industrial references which helped to define an era of industrial design. The exhibition opens November 23rd and runs until April 20, 2014. Newson's signature riveted chaise lounge, both one of his most recognizable and rarest works, will be exhibited in the living room along side the matching, cello-shaped Pod of Drawers (1987), Super Guppy lamp (1987), and honeycombed, marble Voronoi Low Shelf (2008), among other works. The kitchen will contain a more attainable collection, including the curving, plastic Dish Doctor dish rack (1997), dinnerware by Noritake, glassware by Iitalla, cutlery from Alessi, and the Champagne Coffret Magnum (2006) for Don Pérignon. Newson's playful forms and vibrant colors take hold of the children's room, wherein the classic, three-legged Embryo Chair (1988), modular, plastic Bunky Bunk Beds (2010), and "Rocky" Rocking Horse create a vibrant, Jetsonian environment. To catch a glimpse of some Newson-designed clothing from G-Star, head over to the adult bedroom, which will also contain the retro Nimrod chair (2003) and transparent Atmos clock for Swiss watchmakers Jaeger LeCoultre (2008). The minimalist, streamlined Wall Hung "Invisi II" Toilet and Wash Basin (2012) take center stage in Newson's bathroom, while the 021C concept car, designed for Ford and exhibited at the Tokyo Auto Show in 1999, is housed within the garage.
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Rashid Karim–Designed Vodka Bottle Looks Like a Piece of Ice

It seems booze is on high-design minds. The latest in AN's series of high-end liquor bottles by top-tier designers comes from the prolific Prince of Pink, New York’s own Karim Rashid. Teaming up with American luxury vodka brand Anestasia, Karim has delivered a jagged, crystalline container that differs from his usual globulous rose creations. The bottle’s angular forms were supposedly drawn from word “vodka” itself, or more specifically the shapes of the letters V and K. Aside from the asymmetrical bottle design, Rashid is also responsible for the brand’s logo, typeface, and visual identity.
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On View> “3 in 1: Contemporary Explorations in Architecture & Design” at the Art Institute of Chicago

3 in 1: Contemporary Explorations in Architecture & Design The Art Institute of Chicago 111 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, IL Through January 5, 2014 3 in 1 Contemporary Explorations in Architecture and Design is broken down into three small separate exhibitions each revealing different categories: architecture, product design, and fashion. In Reality Lab, the Japanese designer Issey Miyake, head of Reality Lab Studio, reveals a spectrum of diverse and innovative products resulting from his experiments with material, structure, and form. The exhibition includes Miyake’s two products lines: 132 5 and IN EI, which are based on origami-folding techniques that create two-dimensional geometric patterns and unfold into remarkable voluminous forms. Los Angeles architect Greg Lynn’s Stranded Sears Tower explores how computer programming can act as a mode of creative expression. Lynn re-envisions and reconstitutes Chicago’s Sears Tower in order to develop a new kind of flexible and fluid type of architecture. Lastly, the Dutch designers Scholten & Bailings combine craft and industrial practices in order to re-invent everyday objects. Through the use of different colors, forms, and materials, their Colour reveals the numerous amounts of projects that the designers have accumulated over the past 13 years.  
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Q+A> Michael Graves On His J.C. Penney Collection

At J.C. Penney’s recent rebranding launch party, AN spoke with architect and product designer Michael Graves about his new collection for the company and some career highlights. He even offers advice for aspiring architects and designers and talks about some current design work. How did designing a collection for JCPenney come about? I’ve known some of the people at Penney’s since my Target days, so when this opportunity came around we were looking for a way to slow down our commitment to Target at that time. When Penney’s offered what they did to us, we grabbed it in a second. It was such a good deal in terms of having a shop within a store. For me, that’s the game changer. If we were close friends and you told me you had to do some shopping for a relative or something like that, I’d tell you to go to our shop in Penney’s. It’s all there and that’s what excites me. graves_jcp_06 What was your favorite part about designing the collection? Designing the collection. Any challenges you faced with it? Every day you face a challenge; with the materials you’re using, price point, function, appearance. All of that comes together in the quest for good design. But it was wonderful to get to do it and so much fun. People think it’s a struggle and hard work and all of that—and it is—but that’s what’s so gratifying about it is to get to do those things and to make “stuff.” graves_jcp_02 If you had to name a single success of your career thus far, what would it be? That’s a very difficult thing [to answer] because there’s the practice of architecture, there’s the practice and business of product design, there’s health design—which is something we’re engaged in now—there was teaching. But Paul Goldberger or somebody said, “Michael would ultimately be known for the office he made, the people that he produced, the people that came to work at the office then go run a school of architecture somewhere, or when he was teaching how he taught them.” But it’s so hard to say one [element] is worth more than the other because I’ve never thought that way of “what’s the best thing I did,” or “who is my favorite child.” I have a favorite child on given days but designing this [collection] is right up there with everything. To get to open these shops all across the country now and to see what you all say about it will be interesting, as well, because that will really tell us how it’s doing. We will live and die, to some extent, by the consumer’s reaction [to our products]. Penney’s won’t keep it if it doesn’t sell but I think it will do well. graves_jcp_03 Do you have any advice to offer aspiring architects or designers? Yes, two things: read, read, read, and draw, draw, draw. You can’t draw enough. While talking to the new dean of the school of architecture at Princeton, I told him, “I have to draw everyday just like a pianist would have practice the piano everyday.” You have to draw everyday: Once you know how, you can’t suddenly give it up. It’s the same thing with designing. I hate days that I don’t get to work on a building. I go home and I’m in a little bit of a funk because I didn’t get to do my craft that day. I had to give an interview, or talk to students, or talk to a client—all of it interesting. But the thing about my life is that I wouldn’t change it for anything. graves_jcp_04 What excites you about the future of design? What we’re involved in is very exciting and now, especially with healthcare design, we’re really pleased with what’s going on. We’re doing a new hospital in Omaha, Nebraska and I’m so pleased with it. It’s a rehab center and it caters to the whole family, but there are a lot of kids there and kids need their parents. So, when young patients are in the hospital for weeks, at least, we have a place for one or the other of their parents to stay there as well. It’s not just a chair that turns into a bed but a real, little cubbyhole of a room. It’s the first time in hospital design that’s been done. It doesn’t sound like much, but it’s going to be a game changer. graves_jcp_01
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Michael Graves Appointed to Federal Post on Accessibility in the Built Environment

President Obama's second-term White House is still in transition, with Ray LaHood out and rumors of an NTSB replacement, Sally Jewell likely in as Secretary of Interior. Among the non-Cabinet-level appointments, the President appointed Michael Graves to a member of the Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board, an agency "devoted to accessibility for people with disabilities." Graves, who uses a wheelchair after an illness-induced partial paralysis, has been a leader in promoting accessibility in architecture, recently designing prototype houses for wounded and disabled veterans. This month, Graves will also be launching a new line of more than 300 products at retailer J.C. Penney, including kitchen appliances, candlesticks, and a toaster shaped like a piece of toast. The Indianapolis-born architect will return to his hometown on March 28 to give a lecture at the Indianapolis Museum of Art, and he recently spoke with the Indy Star about delivering papers for the publication as a child, architecture, and the new product line. An exhibition of Graves' work, From Towers to Teakettles, is also on display at the Virginia Center for Architecture through March 31.
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Form. Function. Gloves.

For her graduation project at Dutch art and design school ArtEZ, Renee Verhoeven explored the relationship between function and materialization with Concealed Layers of Product Life. Anatomy, movement, and utility are translated through fabrication in a collection of gloves that attempt to tackle one of the fundamental projects of Modern design and architecture. As Verhoeven explained in a statement, “It was an idea I nurtured for a long time: making the outer layers of a product expressive for its interior, the way it functions and the scientific knowledge that it materializes.” “Products generally are constructed in layers," wrote Verhoeven, "each having its own function. These functions are quite often made invisible by techniques that are applied on a microscopic scale. As a result the products skin, its outer layer, is unable to express what going on inside.” Verhoeven was inspired by the writings of British tech-pioneer Kevin Ashton, as well as her participation in a design contest lead by a group of leather tanners in Tuscany, which together led to gloves and the anatomy of human skin as the center for her exploration. View more of her product design work at reneeverhoeven.nl. [H/T Mocoloco.]