Posts tagged with "Prizes":

ASA International Design Competition: Vex Agitated Vernacular

1.DESIGN BRIEF

This year’s ASA International Design Competition aims to upend the typical associations of vernacular architecture and design. The term ‘VEX’ can be approached from a multitude of perspectives, all to challenge, or agitate, the stereotypes of what vernacular should or should not be.

One tends to assume that vernacular architecture is in opposition to modern architecture and lifestyle. There is the perception that vernacular is something that is traditional and therefore is considered to be technologically ‘inept’ or ‘crude.' This relegates vernacular design to irrelevance in today’s society and also implies that it is immutable and static, and ‘unimprovable.’

The challenge of the competition is for participants to create a new type of vernacular with characteristics not commonly associated with vernacular design. The competition is looking to showcase new vernacular design that is mutable, inventive and capable of self-renewal.

The goal is to re-think vernacular as something that can assume performative roles and possess generative potentials. The Jury will reward entrants that can demonstrate vernacular design that is dynamic and is particularly suited to innovation, invention and relevance.

VEX asks:  How can Vernacular agitate the status quo?

- Can Vernacular be a catalyst, a variable, a process, rather than a static element?

- Can Vernacular be a language from which others can spring from and use?

2. SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Each submission must include the following contents:

2.1. The participant can select any specific site as the site of their design. The subject can be architecture, urban design or interior design.

2.2.  After identifying the site, provide conceptual drawings, analytical drawings, sections, plans, renderings or perspective drawings in any scale. Demonstrate how vernacular quality modifies the subject and the resulting design outcome.

3. DELIVERABLES

3.1. Five (5) Graphic Slides: Square Format 420×420 mm each

-  High resolution PDF @ 300 dpi (maximum file size of combined 5 PDF slides: 20* MB)

-  Recommendation: font size used in the graphics should not be less than 11 pt. for

   printing clarity.

-  File name: Firstname_Lastname_300.pdf

3.2. Project Description in English, maximum 300 words

Files that do not meet the specified requirements will not be taken into consideration.

For more details on deliverables and submission process please refer to the competition website.

4. AWARDS

First prize: 4,000    USD

Second prize:  2,000    USD

Third prize: 1,000    USD

Honorable Mention: 3 x 500    USD

5. COMPETITION TIMELINE

-  Official Announcement of competition:  January 30, 2018

-  Online Submission for competition begins: January 30, 2018

-  Deadline for submissions: March 31, 2018

-  Announcement of shortlisted entries: April 15, 2018

-  Finalist Judging and Awarded entries: May 6, 2018

6. REGISTRATION & SUBMISSION

-  Registration is free.

-  Register and submit online at www.asacompetition.com

7. ELIGIBILITY TO PARTICIPATE

-  Open to students, architects, urban planners, designers, artists and thinkers.

-  Submit as an individual or as a team.

-  No restrictions on age, gender or nationality.

-  No limits on the number of submissions.

-  Work cannot be published elsewhere before.

-  Submission cannot be built work or completed projects.

-  The entrant should have legal rights and copyrights to all the material submitted.

   If the project contains any material or elements that are not owned by the entrant,

   the submission shall be excluded from any consideration.  If it is later known that

   rights have been violated, the prize and award will be recalled.

-  The copyright of the project belongs to the entrant.

-  All materials submitted may be displayed and/or published at the discretion of

   The Association of Siamese Architects under Royal Patronage.

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AIA New York’s New Practices Committee Chooses Six Emerging Firms as Winners

New Practices New York, a distinguished competition that’s part of the AIA New York chapter, announced the six winners of its 2016 biennial competition on January 28. To qualify, the practices had to be located within New York City and founded since 2006; the competition was open to multidisciplinary firms, widening the talent pool. The winners are MODU, SCHAUM/SHIEH, stpmj, Studio Cadena, Taller KEN, and Young Projects. The panel of jurors selected the winners from 53 entries, the members are William Menking, AN’s editor-in-chief, Julian Rose, principal of Formlessfinder, Jane Smith, partner at Spacesmith, Martino Stierli, Philip Johnson chief curator of architecture and design at MoMA, and Ada Tolla, partner at LOT-EK. This year’s theme was Prospect and the jury evaluated the firms based on their ability to leverage multiple aspects of their projects and practices and the architecture profession as a whole. The firms will receive a stipend for an installation and exhibition at the Center for Architecture, which will open May 12, 2016, and will participate in symposia and lectures at the Cosentino Showroom, as well as travel to Spain with underwriter Cosentino. About the winners: MODU Codirected by Phu Hoang and Rachely Rotem, MODU is an interdisciplinary firm that focuses on directing people to their environments. The practice has won numerous awards and was given a commendation for “21 for 21” an award that recognizes “the next generation of architects for the 21st Century.” SCHAUM/SHIEH Founders Rosalyn Shieh and Troy Schaum established their firm in 2009 with an emphasis on the city at the scale of a building and the dialogue between projects and urban plans. They operate between Houston and New York City. stpmj Based in New York and Seoul, Seung Teak Lee and Mi Jung Lim founded their firm to explore new perspectives on material and structure with regard to our current social, cultural, environmental and economic fabric. Studio Cadena Benjamin Cadena founded his eponymous studio in Brooklyn; projects range from city planning and commercial projects to exhibitions, houses, and furniture. Taller KEN Part of the design team for the Whitney Museum of American Art, Gregory Melitonov and Ines Guzman founded their studio in 2013. The New York– and Guatemala-based firm’s work includes mixed-use development, residential projects, and installation design. Young Projects Bryan Young founded multidisciplinary design studio Young Projects in 2010 and projects include a retreat in the Dominican Republic, a townhouse in Williamsburg, and a Hamptons bungalow. The firm received the Architectural League Prize in 2013. The New Practices New York 2016 exhibition will be on view at the Center for Architecture, 536 LaGuardia Place, New York City from May 12, 2016.
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Announcing the Gehry Prize

Last year's SCI-Arc graduation. Frank Gehry has won every architecture award you can think of, from the Pritzker to the AIA Gold Medal. Now he has one named after him, thanks to his $100,000 donation to SCI-Arc. The Gehry Prize will be awarded annually to the school's best graduate thesis. The first prize will be handed out this Sunday at SCI-Arc's graduation. Gehry has been a SCI-Arc trustee since 1990, and has been involved with the school since its inception in 1972. Which reminds us: SCI-Arc will be 40 next year.
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Driehaus Awards the Much-Awarded Stern

The University of Notre Dame School of Architecture announced that Robert A. M. Stern has been named this year's Richard H. Driehaus laureate. The prize, which comes with a $200,000 purse, "honors the best practitioners of traditional, classical, and sustainable architecture and urbanism in the modern world," according to a statement. Founded in 2003, the prize has previously honored lesser known architects such as Rafael Manzano Martos of Spain and Abdel-Wahed El-Wakil of Egypt in addition to marquee American traditional and classicist architects like Andres Duany and Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk and Allan Greenberg (several Driehaus recipients have also won or been involved in the National Building Museum's Vincent Scully Prize). Stern's office told AN that he will donate his award to Yale, where he is the Dean of the School of Architecture. Stern's career has covered furniture design, residences, skyscrapers, civic buildings, and town plans, in a variety of historical and modern styles. He is also a noted architectural historian, particularly for his collection of books on New York City. The Comcast Center in Philadelphia is Stern's tallest building to date, and one of his most unabashedly modern designs, though the Driehaus committee was quick to point out its resemblance to an obelisk. Stern designed the masterplan for Celebration Florida, a New Urbanist community originally developed by Disney. Detractors have called the project "sprawl in drag." 15 Central Park West is now one of the New York's most expensive addresses. Stern adapted the forms and style of early classic 20th century apartment houses for contemporary life. The Nashville public library was completed in 2001. A neo-classical residence in Seaside, Florida, the first New Urbanist community, completed in 2006. Robert A. M. Stern.
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Awards Season

First the Pritzker, now the Pulitzers. This year's journalism awards were announced today, and a few of the awards and nominees might be of especial note to the architectural community. First up is the prize for public service journalism--the industry's highest honor--which was awarded to the Las Vegas Sun for a series exploring a chilling spate of construction deaths on the Strip, including at the starchitect-laden City Center. Elsewhere, Inquirer architecture critic Inga Saffron was named a finalist for the criticism prize for "her fascinating and convincing architectural critiques that boldly confront important topics, from urban planning issues to the newest skyscraper." (We think she should have won out over Times art critic Holland Carter.) There were even flashes of impressive architectural photography in the breaking news photo category. And who knew editorial cartoonist Steve Breen was such a capable renderer?