Posts tagged with "Portland":

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Quick Clicks> Coffee, Immobility, Engagement, Hipsters

[ Quick Clicks is AN's guided tour of interesting links from around the web. ] Coffee Break. A fourteen-foot tall neon sign that has been removed from the Knoxville, TN skyline after 50 years is undergoing restoration but needs a new home. Preservation magazine has the story and Knox Heritage has more info on their sign restoration program. Urban Immobility Report? Greater Greater Washington has an update on the controversy of a major traffic congestion report released each year the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) called the Urban Mobility Report (UMR). Last year, CEOs for Cities published a critical analysis of the UMR called Driven Apart pointing out its false conclusions that can distort the congestion level based on the sprawl levels. How will it impact the future of transportation funding in the U.S.? Street Presence. Should urban buildings should put their best face forward? Pointing to a rather uninspiring St. Louis building from the 1980s with its back turned to downtown streets, Urban Review STL argues that a certain level of sidewalk interaction, whether that be storefronts, entrances, or simply windows, should be required through zoning for a more vibrant urban experience. Portlandia? Did you catch the premiere of IFC's new sketch comedy flick Portlandia over the weekend? While it's not quite so much about architecture, it does parody the city that has helped to transform the idea of bikability and the future of the American city. The Oregonian has a roundup of reviews from across the country and Bike Portland has a clip of an upcoming sketch about bike messengers.

NYC Snatches Sustainability Czar from PDX

There are few places better for the Bloomberg administration to look for a new head for the Office of Long-Term Planning and Sustainabilty than Portland, that utopia of urban green living. (To some, it borders on zealotry.) Today the administration announced that David Bragdon, the president of Metro, the City of Roses' land-use and management body, will be replacing the recently departed Rohit Aggarwala. He has his work cut out for him, as his predecessor was the chief architect of the city's lauded PlaNYC 2030 plan, though it appears the office is in capable hands. According to Willamette Week:
Bragdon’s leadership of the regional government will be remembered for the addition of substantial green spaces to the region, bringing fiscal sanity to Metro’s budget, somewhat frosty relations with the suburbs, and an ongoing wrestling match over the issue of whether to expand the urban growth boundary.
He's also a big advocate for alternative transportation, and The Oregonian says he may even be a contender for mayor in 2012. Of Portland, that is, not New York. (Unless of course things go especially well...) As for our mayor, he said the following in a release outlining his decision: "David is an exceptional addition to our team here as we continue to implement the initiatives in PlaNYC and work to update the plan and expand it to include solid waste." Wonder if that was in the job description?
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Designing Better Healthcare

The healthcare reform battle's getting ugly, but at least it can play out against some pretty backdrops. The two built winners of this year's AIA National Healthcare Design Awards, both in Portland, Oregon, are glossy and inviting. Mahlum's Providence North Portland Clinic runs alongside a transit line downtown, greeting the street with a long wall of windows revealing glimpses of murals within. And a dramatic new pavilion at the Oregon Health and Science University (by Perkins + Will in joint venture with Petersen Kohlberg & Associates) spans a 75-foot change in elevation, creating a cascade of expansive vistas and terraces with a pedestrian walkway snaking through them. Congratulations, Portland—you clearly have a thing or two to teach the rest of the country about designing quality healthcare facilities. If only you could teach us how to design quality healthcare, too. But don't get complacent, either, Oregonians.  The remaining winner is a not-yet-built cancer research institute by HKS, in joint venture with UHS Building Solutions, that would entwine elegantly around a "major river" in the northeast. HKS insists the exact location is top secret... perhaps fearing the flashbulbs of those infamous architecture paparazzi?

Best. Video. Ever.

Our friends at Architecture W in Portland recently completed this masterfully low-tech stop-action video— entitled House of Cards—depicting their plans for a new sustainable house made only out of structural wood panels. "We've become bored with glossy computer generated imagery," explains firm partner Brian White. There's not much more we can say besides check it out. And notice the strategic use of the Yoda action figure, of course.