Posts tagged with "Port of Los Angeles":

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Sasaki and Studio-MLA to redevelop Port of L.A. waterfront

Designs for a transformative make-over of the Wilmington waterfront at the Port of Los Angeles are steadily moving forward as new renderings for the project offer a glimpse of what will soon be two of L.A.’s newest public spaces. Renderings unveiled by the Port of Los Angeles showcase views of the Avalon Promenade and Gateway and the Wilmington Waterfront Promenade projects, two new open spaces designed by T.Y. Lin International and Boston-based Sasaki, respectively, on adjacent sites in conjunction with the Wilmington Waterfront Masterplan project. L.A.-based landscape architects Studio MLA is assisting with the design of the Wilmington Waterfront Promenade project. The two public spaces will cap off an L-shaped spine of new open space and future commercial development envisioned by the master plan for the formerly-industrial areas that ring the port. The nine-block plan area includes the 30-acre Wilmington Waterfront Park, also designed by Sasaki, which opened in 2011. For T.Y. Lin International’s Avalon Promenade and Gateway component, plans call for vacating sections of three streets and removing a pair of storage tanks to create a large landscaped open space that will connect the city’s urban fabric with the Wilmington Waterfront to the south. The 13-acre site will contain a public plaza at its northernmost point and will be traversed by a sculptural promenade that runs to the waterfront. The project would involve constructing a new bridge over an existing depressed rail yard, with renderings showing a new cable-stayed pedestrian bridge crossing the gap. The nine-acre Wilmington Waterfront project will be located at the end of this path abutting the harbor. Here, Sasaki and Studio MLA are working to craft an interconnected series of plazas, piers, and restaurants, including a four-acre event space and playground, according to Curbed. A below-grade section of the park will contain a cluster of accessible bathroom facilities. Renderings for these areas showcase a central lawn and plaza fronting the ocean, with active uses located at the site’s corners. The central plaza area gives way to rough-hewn boulders that step into the water, according to the renderings. The developments join a cluster of recently-announced waterfront redevelopment efforts, including the Altasea development by Gensler. Both projects are well into design and are expected to break ground later this year, in anticipation of a 2019 opening.
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More details emerge on the massive Port of Los Angeles redevelopment

Gensler’s Los Angeles office has revealed plans for a $150 million expansion to the Port of Los Angeles by marine science and business innovation group AltaSea. Revealed plans detail a 280,000-square-foot facility encompassing a new waterfront promenade, aquaculture research center, and science hub that combines the existing dockside warehouses with a new visitor’s center and signal-house.

Three formerly industrial warehouse shells with exposed composite steel beams and original overhead trusses will house dedicated research and business development facilities for aquaculture and underwater robotics endeavors. The project’s development will be divided into phases beginning with the redevelopment of Warehouses 58 through 60, which will add 180,000 square feet of combined research and business hubs to the site. This phase also incorporates an education pavilion and wharf plaza. The second and third phases entail renovating Warehouse 57—which will contain 60,000 square feet of laboratory and classroom space—and the construction of the site’s two new structures.

Those new constructions, Berth 56 and a tower dubbed “the Viewing Structure,” are located between the arms of the two docks housing the science warehouse spaces. Berth 56 is a landscape-oriented community center with educational and exhibition spaces, as well as amenities like viewing platforms and a theater. The five-story viewing tower is located at the foot of a Berth 56’s roof terrace, which has been sculpted to blend with a street-level plaza.

Gensler expects to begin construction on the first phase of the project in 2016 with the community center set to open in 2023. 

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Gensler reveals plans for 35-acre Port of L.A. Marine Research Center

Gensler’s Los Angeles office has revealed plans for a $150 million expansion to the Port of Los Angeles by marine science and business innovation group AltaSea. At a ceremony hosted at the firm's Downtown L.A. headquarters, designers at Gensler detailed a 280,000 square foot facility encompassing a new waterfront promenade, aquaculture research center, and science hub set 35-acre stretch of historical docks and waterfront spaces. The project combines the adaptive reuse of existing dockside warehouses with the construction of a new visitor’s center and signal-house. Three formerly industrial warehouse shells, exposed composite steel beams, and original overhead trusses will house dedicated research and business development facilities for aquaculture and underwater robotics endeavors. The project's development will be divided into phases beginning with the redevelopment of Warehouses 58 through 60, which will add 180,000 square feet of combined research and business hubs to the site. This phase also incorporates an education pavilion and wharf plaza into the mix. The second and third phases entail renovating Warehouse 57—which will contain 60,000 square feet of laboratory and classroom space—and the construction of the site's two new structures.  Those new constructions, Berth 56 and a tower dubbed “the Viewing Structure,” are located between the arms of the two docks housing the science warehouse spaces. Berth 56 is a  landscape-oriented community center with educational and exhibition spaces, as well as amenities like viewing platforms and a theater. The 5-story viewing tower is located at the foot of a Berth 56’s roof terrace, which has been sculpted to blend with a street-level plaza. After citing the prominence of tower structures in the port’s historical development, Li Wen, Design Director at Gensler, described the firm’s approach with the new tower as an attempt to, “make a place with a new, 21st century tower that’s all about sustainability. So instead of emitting light, this tower actually harvests energy.” The overall scheme is an attempt to create a closed loop of scientific discovery, product innovation, and entrepreneurial commercialization at AltaSea’s campus. It is also being designed to be “net-positive” by generating more energy, through tidal, wind, and solar generation, than it consumes. Gensler expects to begin construction on the first phase of the project in 2016 with the community center set to open in 2023.
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No Winners at the Port of Los Angeles

TFO Architecture proposed a walkable green rooftop over a new parking structure.
Courtesy TFO?Architecture
The Los Angeles cruise ship terminal in San Pedro is a study in urban blight. The area features a sparkling new fountain, a few isolated new parks and a repainted but aging terminal surrounded by barbed wire fences, ugly, mismatched buildings, surface parking lots, and a lot of empty space. A competition among four local architecture firms was held last May to redesign the terminal and its bleak environs. But AN has learned that it was abandoned in favor of a less ambitious in-house redesign, angering the architects involved and dashing hopes of an area rebirth. Meanwhile, after a year of waiting, half of the teams claim they were never informed of the outcome.
TFO Architecture's proposal for the Los Angeles Cruise Terminal.
[+ Click to enlarge.]
The RFP for the competition called for “conceptual design for a short-term (five to ten years) aesthetic improvement at the World Cruise Ship Terminal” as well as “additional programmatic elements that contribute to and/or enhance existing cruise terminal operations, community interaction, commercial viability, pedestrian and vehicular circulation, marketing concepts, and maintenance feasibility.” Four architectural teams participated in the competition: Tetra Design, MVE Institutional, Anil Verma Associates, and TFO Architecture. Instead of awarding the project to one of these firms, the port recently undertook an in-house $42 million facelift of the terminal that included cosmetic changes like repainting the terminal, adding a new $10.8 million, 71,500-square-foot solar array on its roof, installing new audio, video, and lighting systems, and adding new glass-enclosed gangways to boats.
A linear park proposed by TFO Architecture (left) and the refurbished cruise ship terminal includes a new rooftop solar array (Right).
Courtesy TFO Architecture and Port of Los Angeles [+]
According to port spokesperson Phillip Sanfield the decision not to choose any of the contestants was based on timing and economics. Disney decided to bring a new cruise ship to the port by early this year, so changes needed to be done fast, Sanfield said. And the port decided that the $10 million outlay for the competition was too small to make any major changes. “Although we may reconsider design work in the future, that would be a decision made by the Los Angeles Harbor Commission,” said Sanfield in an email. “Presently there are no plans to do so.” So the desolate area surrounding the terminal remains unchanged, and the architects are not happy about how it happened. “You go there in the middle of the day and the fountain is going and the music is blaring, and there’s nobody there,” described William Taylor, an architect at TFO Architecture. TFO’s scheme included a large green roof over a new parking lot that tied the cruise terminal to the surrounding neighborhood, but averted security concerns by keeping public access away from the cruise docks themselves. “What was really missing—and is still missing—was public space. A connection between the terminal and the waterfront,” explained Taylor.
Anil Verma Associates plans a linear park, amphitheater, and art exhibition zones.
Courtesy Anil Verma Associates [+]
Anil Verma Associates’ plan focused on knitting the neighborhood together with a series of play areas, an amphitheater, an exhibition zone and a linear park, all connected to public transportation. Verma is particularly nonplussed with the port’s approach to the competition, whose $10 million outlay he describes as “a hoax.” “That amount of money would barely pay for painting the terminal,” he said. “They’re just using us, and it’s kind of sad that they’re doing that in a down economy.” Verma and Taylor both explained that their firms spent more than four times the $10,000 competition stipends on their proposals. Meanwhile two of the competition teams say they never heard anything from the port on the competition’s outcome. “We don’t know any more than you know,” said a Tetra Design spokesperson. “It was a little disappointing; there wasn’t a formal resolution to this. It just kind of went away,” added TFO’s Taylor. The port says it informed all four of the teams that it would not select them in letters dated August 19, which the port provided to AN. Meanwhile RFP cancellations—and the scrapping of public work in general— are much more prevalent in these trying times for public agencies. “I think it’s one of the biggest challenges in the profession,” said Andrew Goldberg, Senior Director of Federal Relations at the AIA, of the recent abandonment of investment in public projects. The AIA is currently working on an initiative putting together a list of “Stalled Projects” to raise attention to the issue. “People will just invest in what they have and get by,” said Russell A. Davidson, President of KG&D, a Mt. Kisco, New York firm that has had four county projects shelved recently. “They decide to replace a building, and then that project loses momentum and it becomes ‘let’s put a band aid on the existing facilities and let the next generation deal with it.’”