Posts tagged with "Pop-Ups":

Placeholder Alt Text

West of West designs hidden pop-up store in L.A.’s Melrose Place shopping center

Los Angeles– and Portland, Oregon–based architecture firm West of West recently completed work on a 400-square-foot pop-up shop for optical and sunglass retailer Garrett Leight California Optical (GLCO).

The store is located behind Alfred Coffee & Kitchen in the Melrose Place shopping center in West Hollywood, California. The pop-up shop includes birch-wood-clad interior partitions as well as typographic murals by design studio Cool August Moon. Designs also include a specialized display wall made up of white wooden pegs that support shelves and handheld mirrors.

One of the typographic walls is framed by a built-in bench made out of black-painted birch with a pair of tropical indoor potted plants. The bench sits adjacent to a secondary storefront entrance—the primary access point is through the coffee shop. That entrance is highlighted by a sheet of safety glass and is decorated with GLCO’s orange logo. That logo appears again inside the store, cut out of the birch accent wall behind the sales desk. An experimental magazine shelf made up of wooden dowels is located opposite the glasses wall; a lens-tinting machine and a marble-clad point-of-sale kiosk fill out the remainder of the space with raw concrete floors throughout. West of West explained in a statement: “The project was fascinating to us because of its hidden location—the experience of discovering an unexpected space is in contrast to the majority of the work we do.”

The store is open through the end of June.

GLCO at Alfred Melrose Place 8428 Melrose Place, Los Angeles Tel: 917-262-0955 Architect: West of West

Placeholder Alt Text

The Rockwell Group gets in touch with their emotions at the pop-up Museum of Feelings

Usually, strong smells wafting from the Hudson River are bad news. This time, though, there's nothing to worry about: household fragrance maker Glade has partnered with the Rockwell Group to create a pop-up branding exercise on the waterfront outside of Brookfield Place. The Museum of Feelings ask visitors to reflect on how the senses, especially smell, contribute to emotion. It's like raving with James Turrell at the Yankee Candle factory outlet store—plus crystals. Like a groovy mood ring, a board on the exterior of the museum changes colors to reflect the current mood of the city. Rage triggers like the weather forecast, stock market indices, and flight delays are tracked in real time. The "mood" is translated into color and light. On opening day, the colors, pale blue and deep purple, indicated calm. This being New York City, one wonders whether "calm" is a proxy for "low-level resentment and deep-seated apathy," a more ambiguous emotion that often masquerades as serenity.  Inside, feelings are compartmentalized into five zones, each themed with a different emotion and corresponding scent. The first room, Feel Optimistic, is inspired by the soon-to-be-released Radiant Berries fragrance. Before entering the room passageway of hanging cloth panels, staff members hand out reflective (and scented) cards that trigger and reflect bursts of pink and blue light reflected off of strategically placed interior crystals. Ambient music, not dissimilar to Music for Airports, is intensified or diminished as visitors enter or leave the space. The "Balsam & Fir" room invites you to Feel Joyful. The hanging LED light forest invites comparisons to Yayoi Kusama's installations. The strands emit a piney scent when touched, and it's impossible not to touch. According to a museum staff member, Blue Odyssey, the "marine scent" of the next room, is designed to invigorate. Upon entering the space, an oscillating LED halo encircles the floor around each visitor. The halo moves with its owner, vibrating as subwoofers beneath the floor thump with a bass-heavy beat. Visitors can swap halos by jumping into someone else's halo. The scent in this, and other rooms, was released through wall-mounted scent diffusers that resemble tissue under a microscope. "Feel Exhilarated" is a kaleidoscope of floor-to-ceiling video screens that project patterned peony and cherry blossoms, the base of the room's fragrance. Touch screens arranged around a central panel allow visitors to manipulate the floral patterns. One visitor remarked, "if you stare at the ceiling long enough, you feel nauseous, in a good way!" After exhilaration comes calm. "Lavender & Vanilla" fragrance permeates a candy purple and pink space. The powerful fog machine creates a sight radius of approximately three feet, giving visitors ample opportunity to bump into one another or trip over small children rolling on the heavily carpeted floor. What museum would be complete without a gift shop? The "retail lounge" gives visitors the opportunity to buy small and large Glade candles. The true treat, however, is the "MoodLens." Visitors place their hand on a sensor connected to a large screen and camera. The sensor allegedly reads emotion and generates a "mood selfie" based on that emotion. The selfie is printed out (for free!) on scratch-and-sniff paper that matches the emotion. Selfies are uploaded to the museum's website to create an archive of feelings. The Museum of Feelings is open through December 15th.
Placeholder Alt Text

Nike pops up in Los Angeles’ Arts District, but time is running out

Tomorrow, Saturday, March 28, is the last day to enjoy Nike's Air Max Box pop up at 735 East 3rd Street in LA's Arts District. The installation, inspired by one of the company's shoe boxes and designed to show off the brand's Air Max Zero, is covered with an array of LED displays, projecting kinetic Nike-related graphics. You can even walk inside if you make a reservation, checking out shoes (some viewable under a glass floor, others suspended in what look like pneumatic tubes), and getting a look at working sketches from some of the company's top designers. (Video courtesy Joey Shimoda)
Placeholder Alt Text

An unlikely shipping container pop-up plaza is the brainchild of the San Francisco Giants and Gehl Studio

San Francisco's baseball team, the Giants, and Gehl Studio are planning a pop-up shipping container village on a waterfront parking lot just across McCovey Cove from AT&T Park in Mission Bay. The Yard, as the project is being called, will consist of a beer garden, coffee shop, retail stores and a waterfront deck, all on land intended for a 1.7 million square foot mixed-use development called Mission Rock. But until that project begins construction, the 9-acre site, according to Gehl Studio project lead Blaine Merker, will consist of 15 shipping containers salvaged from the Port of Oakland. The containers will line Terry A. Francois Boulevard, some perpendicular to the thoroughfare, some parallel, some stacked one atop the other, and most creating outdoor rooms for congregating. "This is not about a series of buildings, it's an integrated urban design," said Merker. "Our initial inspiration was to create the feeling of a walkable mixed-use street." According to the SF Chronicle, the Giants will spend $2.5 million on the project and pay $77,000 in annual rent to the Port of San Francisco. Until now, the city's most famous pop-up container village was Proxy, in Hayes Valley, designed by Envelope A+D. Plans for The Yard were presented to the Port of San Francisco this week, and the project is expected to open by March, prior to the baseball season.