Posts tagged with "planters":

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Product> Street Seen: New Landscape Furnishings

Whether used to enhance the identity of an entire community or an individual institution, street furnishings present a primary opportunity to engage the public with design. From planters and bike racks to seating and waste bins, all elements play a part in the dialogue. Cirque Collection Kornegay Design These cast concrete landscape containers take their design cues from nature: Composed of 24 facets placed at 15º intervals, the tapered-cylindrical form interprets the rotation of the earth. Designed by Larry Kornegay. Twist Bike Rack Forms + Surfaces Tweaking a double helix form, this bike rack offers two-point support and multiple locking options. Made of solid cast aluminum, it is available in 20 powder-coat finishes. Big Blok with Lights Tectura Designs Combining seating with lighting, this massive cast-concrete form measures 52x52x18 inches. A coordinating bench-style model is also available. Designed by Damon Farber Associates. Basket Planters Fermob A steel frame/handle makes these aluminum planters portable. The Long model measures 47 x 10 x 29 inches; the High model measures 28 x 13 x 33 inches. Available with anti-UV powder-coating in 24 colors. Designed by Fabio Meliota. Pitch Waste Bin Landscape Forms Pitch is a litter receptacle with flair. The heavy, stable cast-iron base coordinates with the perforated aluminum sides of the container. Available in freestanding and surface mount models, in top- and side-opening styles. Designed by frog. Siardo 700R Benkert Bänke The open structure of this bench ensures that water and debris don't collect on the surface of the seating area. The stainless steel piece can be finished in several powder-coat colors. Designed by Gerhard Benkert.
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Rusticated: That Nouvel Smell

The hanging gardens inside the atrium of Jean Nouvel’s 100 Eleventh Avenue sound idyllic: “From planting boxes built into the structure, trees soar upward and plants cascade down the walls, lending their scent to the atmosphere,” states the building’s website. But the smell may not be so sweet. A source familiar with the project told AN that the huge suspended planters lack proper drainage, leading to standing water and the early onset of rust. Maybe Nouvel can argue that he’s taking a cue from the Cor-ten laden High Line next door?
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Mr. Peanut, Bring on the Nut Mobile

We love food trucks. But none of them have really pushed the design envelope as far as the classics like the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile. In that spirit we welcome the re-fashioned Nut Mobile, from Planters Peanuts. The truck—an Isuzu with a peanut-shaped fiberglass exterior—features a slew of green features: it runs partially on biodiesel fuel, it has a wind turbine, solar panels, LED lighting, and recycled parts.  The truck, which replaces the company's yellow hot-rodded Nut Mobile, will be on tour throughout the country in the coming months, including an appearance at the Global Green Oscar pre-party tonight. And just for good measure, below are a few of our other favorite food-shaped trucks. Are you watching, food truck designers?
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Times Square, Slightly Tamed

I’m a Times Square avoider. It’s too crowded, clogged with slow moving tourists, for me to get where I need to go without being so frustrated that I swear to never return. On rare occasions, I succumb to the charm of the lights, but those moments are usually glimpsed from a distance, down a street corridor or out the window of a cab. But yesterday, on my way to an event in midtown, I chose to go through Times Square to see how it had changed since Department of Transportation Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan’s recent street closure plan had been implemented. While I don’t think anything will persuade me to visit Times Square with any regularity, the mini plazas created by the closure of Broadway from 47th to 42nd streets go a long way in improving the place (Broadway from 35th to 33rd Streets in Herald Square was also closed). The increase in public space makes it much easier, and more pleasant, to walk through. The cheap lawn chairs—which look oddly right there, though they are already sagging from all the use—give people a place to relax and hang out, so that the square feels like a giant, and highly animated, street party. Sadik-Khan deserves credit for recognizing the potential lying under our feet and tires as well as the pent-up desire for public space in New York. The spaces are not designed—just some orange barriers and the chairs—so it will be interesting to see what DOT will do to make the plazas permanent. DOT is obviously making these improvements with very little money, but I hope that Times Square will get something beyond the standard-issue planters used elsewhere. It is a special place, special enough that I only need to pass through it a few times a year.