Posts tagged with "plain dealer":

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Downtown Cleveland Alliance taps Chicago’s PORT to reinvent a shadowy underpass

Chicago-based PORT Urbanism will work with the Downtown Cleveland Alliance to turn a forbidding underpass near Cleveland's warehouse district into a vibrant pedestrian space, now that the Chicago-based firm has been selected as the winner of a design competition to revive the Main Avenue Bridge. Renderings of a plan to remake the Main Avenue Bridge underpass in Cleveland. (PORT) Speaking to the Cleveland Plain Dealer's Steven Litt, PORT principal and Ohio native Christopher Marcinkoski said the hope is to "make a space that's exciting and comfortable for the pedestrian, but that's also efficient and clear for vehicular traffic coming through it." The Main Avenue Bridge spans the Cuyahoga River just south of the $500 million Flats East Bank development. Litt describes the existing condition that prompted the design competition:
The dark and shadowy underside of the bridge, which rises above Main Avenue as the road descends west of West 9th Street at the edge of the Warehouse District, can feel confusing to motorists and unwelcoming to pedestrians.
The firm's proposal, which comes with a tentative budget of $800,000, beat out plans from two other finalists: New York's Balmori Associates and fellow Chicagoans Latent Design. That money will have to come quickly, as the project is scheduled to open before the Republican National Convention meets in Cleveland next year. Renderings of a plan to remake the Main Avenue Bridge underpass in Cleveland. (PORT) Renderings of a plan to remake the Main Avenue Bridge underpass in Cleveland. (PORT) Renderings of a plan to remake the Main Avenue Bridge underpass in Cleveland. (PORT) Renderings of a plan to remake the Main Avenue Bridge underpass in Cleveland. (PORT)
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After planning commission okay, Cleveland is set to install its first pop-up parklet

Parklets are coming to Cleveland. The urban planning tool remaking urban streetscapes from Los Angeles to Chicago got a nod from Cleveland's Planning Commission last week, clearing the way for an outdoor living room to replace a parking space in front of the popular Noodlecat restaurant at 234 Euclid Avenue. Pending permits, the pedestrian area and space for street theater should pop up in less than one month, reports the Cleveland Plain Dealer's Steven Litt. The nonprofit Historic Gateway Neighborhood Corp. worked with David Jurca of Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative and architect Jason Rohal of Vocon to design the space, gathering about half the of the necessary $7,000 from the co-op Cleveland Collectivo. Cleveland's first miniature, plug-in public space will take the form of a wooden deck, outfitted with moveable furniture and stools. If it's popular, it could be the first of many.
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McDonald’s Development Flares Urbanist Tensions in Cleveland

Cleveland’s conflicting development pressures came to a head last week over one avenue on the city’s West Side, and whether its future holds car-oriented businesses like McDonald’s or lanes for public transit and bike paths. The Plain Dealer's Steven Litt reported on developers’ plans to suburbanize the area around Lorain Avenue at Fulton Road: “Residents hate the idea with a passion,” he wrote. Much of Cleveland was designed when its population was far greater than it is today. Though on the rebound, the city has far different needs than it did in decades prior. That’s the thinking behind the Ohio City Inc. community development corporation’s new plan, which calls for a $17.3 million overhaul of the avenue from West 25th to West 85th streets. The route would include a 2.3-mile, bicycle track along the north side of the street—the city’s first separated, two-way paths for bikes. Proponents of the plan and those who’d prefer automobile-oriented development could have it out at an upcoming community meeting in January in the Detroit Shoreway neighborhood (time and place to be announced). The City Planning Commission could pick it up from there. Cleveland’s Ohio City neighborhood has enjoyed a renaissance in recent years, and recently reexamined transportation policies to build on the increasingly urban character of this self-described artisan neighborhood.