Posts tagged with "Pierre Chareau":

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“Pierre Chareau: Modern Architecture and Design” at The Jewish Museum

Pierre Chareau: Modern Architecture and Design is the first-ever U.S. show on the French designer and architect and the first show globally on Chareau in 20 years. It highlights the architect’s rare remaining furnishings, light fixtures, interiors, and his extensive art collection, with an emphasis on his time spent in New York. The exhibition was designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro (DS+R), which used archival photographs and pochoir prints to recreate four interiors designed by Chareau in virtual reality: the salon and garden of his seminal Maison de Verre, a living room, and Chareau’s own home office. To represent Chareau’s Maison de Verre, DS+R also created a large-scale digital reconstruction that meticulously documents the house, as short films art-directed by Diller demonstrate the house in action.

Pierre Chareau: Modern Architecture and Design The Jewish Museum 1109 5th Avenue New York, NY Through March 26, 2017

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A legendary French designer and architect gets his due at the Jewish Museum

Pierre Chareau: Modern Architecture and Design will zero in on the legendary French designer and architect who rose from modest beginnings in Bordeaux, France—with no formal training as an architect—to become one of the most sought-after designers in Europe. His interiors and furniture balanced the opulence of traditional French decorative arts with the clean lines and industrial materials of modernism.The exhibition will place Chareau within the context of France between World War I and II by exploring his influential patrons, engagement with top artists, and designs for the film industry. Paintings, sculptures, and drawings from his personal collection—by artists such as Piet Mondrian, Marc Chagall, and Amedeo Modigliani—will be on display, as will his furniture and light fixtures, vintage photographs, and the pochoir prints he made of his interiors. Also featured will be his designs for important projects in Europe and America, including the Maison de Verre, the 1932 classic modernist home in Paris, and the 1947 house he designed for the artist Robert Motherwell in East Hampton, New York, that was later demolished. The exhibition also will explore Chareau’s flight from Nazi persecution in France to New York; his attempts to rebuild his career there; and the dispersal of many of his works during and after World War II.

Pierre Chareau: Modern Architecture and Design The Jewish Museum, 1109 5th Avenue, New York November 4–March 26

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First U.S. exhibition devoted to Pierre Chareau opens at NYC Jewish Museum

Pierre Chareau: Modern Architecture and Design at the Jewish Museum is the first-ever U.S. show on the French designer and architect and the first show on Chareau globally in 20 years. It highlights the architect's rare remaining furnishings, lighting fixtures, interiors, and pieces from his art collection. The exhibition was designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro (DS+R) and Liz Diller was present for the show opening. “Chareau was always a hero of mine in school, but I couldn’t quite figure him out,” she said. “Decorative, functional, rubber, metal, glass, mahogany, Marxism, hinges, things that swing, clinical, gynecological, lush, and idiosyncratic most of all. This opportunity really gave me a second chance to learn about this figure.” Chareau, who left Paris in 1940 after Germany occupied the city during WWII, lived in New York for ten years and attempted to rebuild his career in the U.S., expanding his work into metal and glass and landing commissions such as Robert Motherwell’s house in East Hampton, Long Island. During this time his extensive art collection was sold, including pieces by Picasso and Mondrian, and his designs were similarly scattered. The show attempts to reconcile these losses by piecing them together in cohesive ensembles. DS+R faced several challenges when designing the exhibition. “How can one architect display another architect's work without their voice getting in the way?” Diller said. “We knew we had to find some kind of neutral voice that was in the background, but also present.” Another one of the challenges for the exhibition, Diller said, was to resituate Chareau’s rare works without resorting to full period rooms that—for spatial and aesthetic reasons—weren’t ideal. Instead, the firm used archival photographs and pochoir prints to recreate four interiors designed by Chareau in virtual reality for visitors to experience: the salon and garden of his seminal Maison de Verre, a living room he designed, and Chareau’s own home office. “Very little of Chareau’s interior production survives—a private residence an ocean away and an array of singular furnishings that are in museums and private collections dispersed to all corners of the world. These solo pieces are meaningful in their native settings, but removed they lose their relationship to space, to architecture, to time, to function; they are truly orphaned. Virtual reality provided the perfect opportunity to re-spatialize these artifacts, these pieces of furniture,” Diller said. For the Maison de Verre, DS+R wanted to convey the spatial transparency and the open, industrial aspects of the building. Taking a clinical, analytical perspective, DS+R created a large-scale digital reconstruction that meticulously documents the house as short films art-directed by Diller demonstrate the house in action. Pierre Chareau: Modern Architecture and Design will be on view at the Jewish Museum November 4 through March 26.
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Quick Clicks> Glass, Steel, Foam, Reel

Glass wear. Alistair Gordon visits the entrancingly translucent Maison de Verre in Paris, Pierre Chareau's 1928 house of glass blocks, and speaks with current owner Robert M. Rubin about his ongoing restoration of the early modernist icon. Here's a preview of Gordon's feature that will appear in the next WSJ Magazine. Steely resolve. The Calatrava-designed PATH hub for the World Trade Center is now over budget to the tune of $180 million, reports DNA. The stratospheric overrun is due in large part to the decision to use extra steel to "harden" the building for security reasons. The Port Authority Board passed the revised budget on Thursday morning, promising to bankroll the extra costs with a contingency fund. Featuring...foamcore! San Francisco's Museum of Craft commandeers a space near the Moscone Center for a pop-up installation that presents architectural model-making as a form of craft. The show offers a glimpse into the process of 20 notable SF-area architecture firms, writes the San Francisco Chronicle. Awards go immaterial. Producers Bruce Cohen and Don Mischer talk to the Hollywood Reporter about the set design for this year's Oscars (airing this Sunday), revealing that they'll rely on projections to create a constantly changing, animated environment within the Kodak Theater. Architect David Rockwell, who designed the sets in 2009 and 2010 (and snagged an Emmy in the process), this year passed the torch to production designer Steve Bass.
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Sitting Pricey

Economic uncertainty has done little to dampen enthusiasm at the Yves Saint Laurent and Pierre Bergé Collection auction at Christie’s in Paris. Multiple sales records have been broken, including the highest price for a piece of 20th Century design, Eileen Gray’s Art Deco “dragon chair” from 1917-1919, which fetched $28,341,909, far surpassing the high estimate of $3,833,040. Gray (1878-1976) is best known for her chrome-plated tubular steel side tables from 1927, which are still in production. This version, which goes so well with Corbusier armchairs, is for sale at Design Within Reach for $550. The dragon chair shows how much Gray’s work evolved in less than ten years. And though many modernists renounced the art deco, art moderne and other transitional styles as products of bourgeois decadence, many modern designers began their careers working in these much less dogmatic and highly seductive styles. Another such example from the sale, a pair of curved Honduran mahogany stools designed Pierre Chareau, architect of landmark modernist Maison de Verre, were sold for $44,767. Design history aside, would you sit on a $28 million anything?