Posts tagged with "Physical Models":

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This designer crafts midcentury modern furniture that could fit in the palm of your hand

A new exhibition, "Atomic Fusion: The Zen Artistry of Michael Yurkovic," showcases the work of Michael Yurkovic, principal at Park Ridge, Illinois–based Atomic Miniature, who creates 1/12th scale models of midcentury modern (MCM) design classics.

Yurkovic, who is a a member of the International Guild of Miniature Artisan, offers select works from his portfolio of MCM and Atomic Age furniture and design at the D. Thomas Fine Miniatures in Hastings-on-Hudson, New York. Inspiration, Yurkovic says in a press release, comes from the work of Eero Saarinen and Charles Eames, and his own career as a successful toy and game designer.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9THrTmoYis

Using thermoform plastics, high quality hardwood, molded plywood and vinyl, Yurkovic makes all his models by hand. His creations embody the lifestyle associated with MCM design which Yurkovic openly embodies, while additionally, they act as inspiration for further projects, contributing to the meditative space Yurkovic uses to work in.

This results in a Zen-like ethos with a focus on simplicity. Consequently, Yurkovic seldom revisits projects to tweak or make modifications, relying on his intuition rather than, as he says, "fixating on a goal or conventional thinking."

Darren T. Scala, a fan of Yurkovic's work since they met at The Guild School and miniaturist and owner of D. Thomas Fine Miniatures said: “I am excited to showcase Michael’s unique interpretation of the MCM movement. His creation of classic MCM features are rarely seen of this quality in the world of fine scale miniatures and I am so pleased to showcase his work in my gallery.”

The exhibition will run from March 5, 2016 through May 1, 2016 and on the opening day, an all-day Master Class will be on offer to those who want to learn about period design and create their own MCM shadow box. The day after, on March 6 from 3-6 p.m., Yurkovic will also discuss his vision and creative process at a special Open House.

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Prefabricated Glamping Tents by ArchiWorkshop

Dynamic steel and PVDF structures shelter campers in style.

In South Korea, glamping—or “glamorous camping”—is all the rage. The practice combines conventional camping’s affinity for the outdoors with hotel amenities, including comfortable bedding and fine food. Seoul firm ArchiWorkshop’s prefabricated, semi-permanent glamping structures are a design-minded twist on the traditional platform tent. “We [set out to] create a glamping [tent] that gives people a chance to experience nature very close, while also providing a uniquely designed architectural experience,” said partner Hee Jun Sim. “There are many glamping sites in Korea, but they’re actually not so high-end. We were able to bring up the level of glamping in Korea.” ArchiWorkshop designed two models of glamping tents. The Stacking Doughnut is, as the name suggests, circular, with a wedge-shaped deck between the bedroom and living room. “We put the donuts at different angles, stacked them . . . and simply connected the lines. This line became the structure,” explained Sim. “The basic idea was very simple, but in the end the shape was very dynamic.” The Modular Flow is a gently oscillating tube, its sleeping and lounging areas separated by an interior partition. The shape was created from a series of identical modules lined up back-to-front to produce the curve. Both models feature a white, double-layer PVDF membrane stretched over a stainless steel frame. The decks are built of wood, while the interior floors are carpeted in a cream-colored textile flooring product from Sweden.
  • Fabricator Dong-A System
  • Designers ArchiWorkshop
  • Location Danwol-myeon, Yangpyeong-gun, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea
  • Date of Completion 2013
  • Material PVDF, stainless steel, wood, textile flooring
  • Process hand drawing, modeling, AutoCAD, Rhino, 3ds Max, MPanel, laser cutting, welding, bolting
Sim and partner Su Jeong Park “used every possible tool” to design the glamping units. They started with hand sketches, then moved to physical models. “The model wasn’t so simple to make because it was a strong shape [without] straight or fixed walls,” said Sim. Once they had determined a rough form, they bounced among multiple computer programs—including AutoCAD, Rhino, and 3ds Max—to refine the design and create shop drawings. Sim and Park used MPanel to generate the membrane surface. Dong-A System prefabricated the glamping tents off site, laser cutting the components of the steel frame before welding them together. “Because every part of the shape is connected, it had to be super-precise, or the end form would [not be] straight,” said Sim. On site, the structures were simply bolted into place. ArchiWorkshop built eight glamping structures on spec on a site in South Korea. “We actually used the whole site as a test site, to show the world, ‘Hello, we are [here],’” said Sim. The architects are open to adapting the designs to suit different climates or cultures. “What we designed on the test site is very Asian or Korean, a poetic kind of shape, but I think different countries have different clients with different needs,” explained Sim. While Sim acknowledges that there are a number of luxury tents already on the market, he is not concerned. “We had a bit of a late start,” he said, “but we . . . have a different concept with a different kind of approach to the tent.” In the meantime, the challenge of designing outside the box has been its own reward. “We love designing buildings,” said Sim, “but this kind of different structural project is also very refreshing for architects.”