Posts tagged with "Photography":

Esto-ordinary Videos

"Everybody's doing it." That's how Erica Stoller of Esto described the august architectural photo agency's foray into web video. Now don't fret. At the heart of these videos remains Esto's unparalleled still camerawork, but given these changing times, experimentation is in order. And, as Stoller's colleague Joel Sanders explained, the philosophy remains the same. "Esto has always been about expressing architecture in its truest, purest, most honest form," Sanders told us over the phone. "We see these videos simply as an extension of that. It's a means to describing the architecture." For its first two videos, Esto showcases the work of photographer Albert Vecerka. One documents the restoration, more than 13 years later, of P.S. 70, a burned out Bed-Stuy school that was transformed by Robert A.M. Stern into the Excellence Charter School. The other presents a time lapse installation from last summer of KieranTimberlake's Cellophane House at MoMA's prefab show, Home Delivery.
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Ray Kappe Remembers Marvin Rand

We ran a rememberance of Marvin Rand yesterday by Larry Scarpa of Pugh+Scarpa. Here's another from Ray Kappe, the founding director of Sci-Arc:
Marvin Rand was a good friend and an exceptional architectural photographer. I have fond memories of that slight, energetic man with the large camera photographing one of my earliest houses in Sherman Oaks, in 1956. We grew up in Los Angeles architecture together--I developing my practice, and he photographing some of the most important buildings in Los Angeles--from documenting the Watts Towers, Greene and Greene, the architecture of early modernist Irving Gill, the Case Study houses and other works of Craig Ellwood, to many of the young architects of today. Marvin enjoyed working with younger architects, especially in recent years. He switched to digital photography and used the latest techniques. I am sure that is what kept him young at heart. He was also generous with some of us older members of the profession later in life, photographing work that he thought was important, and without charge. He honored me by photographing my 50 Year Retrospective exhibit at the A+D Museum in 2003-2004, and contributed two large major photographs, 5’ x 8’, which hung from the ceiling. Those of us who were fortunate to know and work with Marvin, as well as the architectural profession at large, have lost a generous spirit, and a talented friend and advocate. He will be sorely missed.
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Real Estate Without Us (+Rendering)

There have been countless symbols for the end of the real estate boom, both literal--the collapse of Countrywide, the Fannie & Freddie takeover, the unfinished tract homes and decaying "For Sale" signs--and figurative--the Eastside crane accidents, the TVCC Fire. But we think this back-to-nature scene spotted over the weekend in Williamsburg takes the, uh, mortgage. Perhaps the only thing more amazing than a Red-Tailed Hawk alighting upon an I-Beam of a half-finished condo a few blocks from the Graham Avenue L-stop is the scene it induced: two Italian women straight out of Scorsese and two bike-hipsters straight out of Quicksilver, all gawking at the same raptor. It even stopped traffic on Manhattan Avenue. The perfect tableau of a neighborhood that never was and never will be again. The project is 123 Skillman Avenue, designed by Robert Scarano Architects. It had lain dormant for years--becoming affectionately known as Skillman Ave. Pool of Death--but city records show the site very much back in action after a million dollar sale in August. Combined with the fact that red-tailed hawks are a rather common sight in the city, what seemed like a Weismanian dream on a brisk, sunny Sunday turns out to be just another Brooklyn condo project plugging along come windy, fluorescent Monday. Still, it was pretty badass when he swooped down into the pit and nabbed a rodent snack. UPDATE: Robert Scarano kindly sent along the following rendering of the building planned for the site. He also joked that the hawk was his and meant to keep meddlesome bloggers away.
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Texas Tea

It's hard to imagine an industry by which humans could have changed the natural landscape more so than through the business of getting crude out of the ground, refining it, and shipping it around the globe. Which makes the oil industry a perfect subject for the Center for Land Use Interpretation (CLUI), a Culver City, California-based research organization that conducts studies into the nature and extent of human interaction with the earth's surface. And where better to examine what oil hath wrought than in Texas? Beginning on January 16th and running through March 29th, the CLUI will exhibit just what it has learned in the Lone Star State with Texas Oil: Landscape of an Industry at the Blaffer Gallery, The Art Museum of the University of Houston. The research on display at the exhibition was gathered over the past year while the CLUI acted as the University of Houston Cynthia Woods Mitchell Center’s first artist-in-residence. The show will open with an aerial video, picturing fly-by views of the expansive stretches of the region's oil refineries. In addition to this projection, the gallery's walls will be decked with photographs and texts that describe many different sites across the vast state, from west Texas oil towns such as Odessa and Kermit to petrochemical processing centers on the Gulf Coast. The CLUI's photos pay special attention to places where evidences of previous uses or historical events underpin the oil industry's installations. And if you do find yourself in the Bayou City this spring, be sure to call the Mitchell Center's hotline (713-743-5548) for a boat tour of Buffalo Bayou.