Posts tagged with "Philippe Starck":

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Product> From Pawson to Libeskind, Quick Picks from Milan Design Week

AN editors swept and tweeted through the exhibit halls of the venerable Salone del Mobile last week, as well as the myriad satellite design events, exhibits, and installations that popped up around Milan. Footsore but aesthetically satiated, the AN team has reassembled stateside to share some of the best finds from the fair. Casamania Color Fall A lacquered, digital print enlivens the interior of the shelves, which are constructed of humble MDF. Designed by Garth Roberts. Cassina 9 Tables Marble base in black or white, with tops of aluminum, marble, or painted mirror glass. Designed by Piero Lissoni. Cappellini Lotus De Luxe Available with or without castors and/or arms, this chair is suitable for residential and office use. Wooden frame with molded polyurethane cushions covered in fabric or leather. Designed by Jasper Morrison. Viccarbe Trestle Solid oak legs are topped by padded or smooth upholstery. Seating modules are 60 inches in length; up to three benches can be seamlessly joined together. Designed by John Pawson. Cristalplant Slide Towel Shelf A polished aluminum loop slides up or down to both hold and hang bath towels. Designed by Cory Grosser. Poliform Web Bookcase Fabricated of Dupont Corian, this shelving unit is as much sculpture as it is storage. Designed by Daniel Libeskind. Kartell Uncle Jim Demonstrating the current limits of injected polycarbonate fabrication, this single-piece chair comes in four transparent colors. Designed by Philippe Starck.
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Unveiled> Philippe Starck and Riko Design Series of Pre-Fab Homes

[beforeafter]starck_prefab_03a starck_prefab_03b[/beforeafter]   World-renowned designer Philippe Starck has earned yet another feather for his cap in a recent collaboration with Riko, a European manufacturer of sustainable wooden buildings. Stemming from a drive to develop industrially manufactured homes that fulfill housing needs across the globe, the pair created P.A.T.H. (Prefabricated Accessible Technological Homes), a line of 34 turnkey homes merging timeless design, advanced technology, functionality, and sustainability. P.A.T.H. can be customized from layout and interior finishes to distinctive facades and roofing. [beforeafter]starck_prefab_02a starck_prefab_02b[/beforeafter]   Each P.A.T.H. model is characterized by Starck’s signature design, yet homeowners choose each aspect to create their unique spaces. The pre-fab homes provide a range of housing models that vary in size, number of rooms, levels and floor plans. A configurator allows homeowners to browse and select their preferred models. In the early planning stage, all details of the home are meticulously engineered and rendered. Then, bulky building elements such as walls and roof structures are prefabricated, filled with insulation and finished with closing panels in a strictly controlled fabrication facility. The prefabrication system shrinks the amount of time necessary for on-site assembly, which takes several weeks following the completion of the initial infrastructure and foundation. Two months are necessary for electrical and mechanical installations and to outfit the home with the selected finishes. Total time from start to finish is six months. The most sophisticated sustainable construction engineering has been utilized in developing P.A.T.H.  Only high-quality, environmentally friendly materials are used throughout the production and building process. Wood has been selected as the system’s main building material since it is natural and renewable, giving the homes zero-energy or even positive-energy potential. [beforeafter]starck_prefab_01b starck_prefab_01a[/beforeafter]
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Q+A> Design Week with Philippe Grohe

After the release of the new Organic Collection, designed by Philippe Starck for Axor/Hansgrohe, AN sat down with the head of the brand to talk about working with the designer, the technology behind the product, and Grohe's formula for success. How did Axor/Hansgrohe start working with Philippe Starck? We started working with Philippe Starck in 1998 and it has always been a special relationship. I was very lucky because I followed my mother to the French part of Switzerland, so I speak both German and French. Not only does it help [Philippe and I] communicate [in French] but language is also culture. You think in a different way when speaking French versus German simply because of the structure of the language. How long did it take to complete the project? The Organic collection was a three-and-a-half year project. Many designers think [that pace] is too slow but it's a highly industrial product and we had a lot invested—not just financially but in the technology. The new spray cartridge, for example, took quite some work. It's much more than just a nice shape. We are now testing some new technology but we must test longer than we would for products with existing technology. [More testing means] you get a higher level of assuredness that the whole 'shebang' will work. Please speak to the technology behind the water efficiency of the Organic Collection. Well, if you really look for potential to save water its on the shower side. It's where we lose the most. But we use various [water saving] technologies in both the Axor and Hansgrohe brands. In fact, we've started to study the transparency of efficiency and consumption [related to water use]. The other thing we consider is the perception of water. When you bring it away from being a commodity and bring it closer to nature through studies of laminarity, you can see those results in our waterfall technology for Axor's Massaud Collection. Transparent water is less comfortable because it splatters more, so you have to bring down the volume, but its a fine line and we try to address this [with our products]. Another aspect of this project is the optical perfection of water. On the mixer side, the flow rate [for the Organic Collection] is at .9 gallons per minute [standard flow rates are around 2 gallons per minute]. We can't control installation of the [building's water] system but we do our best to accommodate. It's not as easy to regulate warm water, but as you regulate the quantity that becomes easier. It's the same reason we have a shower spray, because you feel the temperature differently [with changes in spray volume]. The shape of the collection is very unique. When you do something very different, only three to five percent of people will like it and the bathroom is a conservative [place]. But if you change the archetype [people] can access it easier. What's the greatest success of the collection? The success of the Collection is a veritable cocktail of elements. You can have the best ingredients but if you mess up while you're cooking its gone. But [the Organic Collection] has this incredible shape and I have to tip my hat to Philippe. He really proves that he's on top of things consistently. This is a very new shape and the majority of people like it from the first view. You need that attraction when you want to change the habits of people. We try to put a lot of values into our products and I think this perception comes through in discussion, one in particular that I had recently with Fabio Novembre. We've used flow restrictive [flow] technology for 20 years [so there is lots of added value] but it always comes down to that last cent. [The] people [working on the project] don't care what happens after. He said, "You can impress rich people with beauty only." And he's right but you have to like the product first. And [based on the initial reception], for that we must thank Philippe.
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Miami's development booming: Top 11 starchitect-designs remaking the Magic City

After a tumultuous few years, Miami’s real estate market is on the rise once again. When the recession hit the city in 2007, new developments came to a dramatic halt and abandoned construction sites became ubiquitous. But now, a surge of new projects—running the gamut from residential and retail to hotels and cultural institutions—are cropping up around Miami with many more slated for construction in the next few years. And some heavy hitters, such as Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas, Herzog and de Meuron, and Bjarke Ingels, have signed up to lend their design sensibility to Miami's changing landscape. The Miami Herald reported that the city now boasts 20 new condo towers with an additional five towers in the works for neighborhoods just north and south of downtown Miami. AN has compiled a list of the most significant projects taking shape in the Magic City. Collins Park Garage by Zaha Hadid Your typical parking garage is usually a utilitarian, aesthetically bland structure that falls short on imagination. The city of Miami, however, has been reversing this trend and has commissioned architects to elevate the run-of-the-mill car park into a one-of-a-kind piece of architecture that draws visitors. Zaha Hadid is the latest architect to put her spin on the parking garage. For Collins Park, she has designed a sleek, curving structure that offers 400 parking spaces and retail on the ground level. The car park is in the process of being built. 1000 Museum by Zaha Hadid Zaha Hadid is leaving her imprint on Miami. Next up, she'll design a high-end residential tower, One Thousand Museum, for local developers Gregg Covin and Louis Birdman, that will be located on Biscayne Boulevard in Downtown Miami across from what will be Museum Park. According to Miami Condo Investments, the luxury high-rise will consist of 83 units and will run from $4 million up $12 million. Jade Signature by Herzog & De Meuron It seems like Herzog & De Meuron always have something brewing in Miami. The firm just released renderings of their new luxury condo, Jade Signature, located right on the ocean in Sunny Isles Beach. The planned 650-foot-tall, 55-story tower, though, might be over the Federal Aviation Administration’s height limit since any building over 499-feet at that location is considered dangerous. Asi Cymbal Building by TEN Arquitectos Developer Asi Cymbal has selected Enrique Norten and TEN Arquitectos to design a new mid-rise commercial building in Miami’s Design District. The development will consists of high-end retail, parking, offices, event space, and rooftop restaurant. The developer and Curbed Miami are currently holding a competition to name the new building. Portside Miami PortMiami launched a competition in 2011 commissioning plans for a new commercial district, dubbed the World Trade Center, and just recently revealed finalist PlusUrbia’s designs, which consists of a mix of infrastructure updates and major commercial and residential development. PlusUrbia’s plan includes new cruise-ship terminals and berths, and according to Curbed, skyscrapers, an expanded marina, hotels, retail, and luxury towers. SLS Hotel by Arquitectonica and Philippe Starck The chatter in Miami is that local developer Jorge Perez of the Related Group plans on building a 132-room SLS hotel designed by Arquitectonics with interiors by Philippe Starck, in addition to 450 condos ranging in size from 720 to 1,500 square feet, in the Brickell area. The 51-story tower is currently under pre-construction and is expected to be complete in 2015. The Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science by Grimshaw The new Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science (formally the Miami Science Museum), designed by Grimshaw Architects, is a $273 million complex that will house galleries, a planetarium, and wildlife center. This 250,000-square-foot building, located in Museum Park, will function like a “living building” with a vegetated roof and neighboring wetlands. The project is expected to be completed by 2014. Miami Marine Stadium This modernist 6,566-seat stadium perched on the Virginia Key has been abandoned for over twenty years, but now, steps are being taken to bring it back to life. Cuban-American architect Hilario Candela’s concrete modernist stadium is the first purpose-built venue for powerboat racing in the US. A few years ago, the stadium, now listed as a National Treasure, received $3 million in funding from Miami-Dade County Commissioners to preserve the modernist stadium and also turn it back into a water sports venue with concerts. At the end of last year, the Marine Stadium site plan, which includes a “Flex Space Park” and “Maritime Center” for operations and amenities, won the city’s approval, and next it goes in front of the Miami City Commission and the Miami Sports and Exhibition Authority. Once the plan gets the green light, Friends of Miami Marine Stadium will focus their efforts on fundraising for the stadium. The Grove at Grand Bay by Bjarke Ingels Group The once popular celebrity-frequented Grand Bay Hotel will become the site of Bjarke Ingels’ two new twisting residential towers in Coconut Grove. The 20-story luxurious high-rises will feature terraces, wraparound balconies, and a roof deck with private and communal pools. The $400 million project is slated for completion in 2014. Miami Beach Convention Center The competition is heating up in Miami between two developments teams vying for the massive Miami Beach Convention Center project. According to Curbed, Rem Koolhaas, the architect on the South Beach ACE team (with developers Robert Wennett and Tishman and landscape architect Raymond Jungles), went head to head with Bjarke Ingels of the Portman-CMC team (with developr Ugo Columbo and landscape architects West 8) at a public meeting a few weeks ago to show off their designs. Both teams propose new landscaping and parks, retail space, and residential developments for the 52-acre site in addition to plans for the convention center and updating the area around City Hall. Pérez Art Museum Miami Just as Herzog & de Meuron embarks on the Jade Signature tower, the firm is nearing completion of its 200,000 square-foot Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM and formally know as  the Miami Art Museum). The new three-story building will house interior and exterior programming space for the museum’s collections and special exhibitions; an educational complex with classrooms, auditorium, and digital workspaces; and a restaurant and store. Shaded by a canopy, the museum will sit on an elevated platform and open to a veranda and plazas. If all goes as planned, the new building will be open to the public by fall of 2013.
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Savior of the Meat Market

When talking to Florent Morellet, don't call it the Meatpacking District. For the eponymous owner of now-closed diner/bistro Florent on Little West 12th Street, it's the Meat Market. Well before SoHo House and long before Pastis, there was Florent, the subject of a new documentary by David Segal, Florent: Queen of the Meat Market. I found out about the New York opening of the film while showroom hopping on Green Street last week. At Kartell, the perfectly bouffant-ed Darinka Chase encouraged me to try out Philippe Starck's Magic Hole. Before slinging chic plastic, Chase spent twenty years as hostess at the downtown den of dining debauchery. She vividly recalls how preservationists met at the restaurant in an effort to preserve the district. "At the time people did think it was kind of nuts, like landmarking the city dump," she said. The eatery was always a hub for a lot of left-leaning causes, acting as a gathering place for gay activists, AIDS activists, fringe artists, and, much later, for preservationists.  When the neighborhood took a turn toward high fashion, the area's characteristic metal awnings started coming down. The film devotes a good bit of time on how Morellet helped mobilize the community and suggests that, in many ways, Florent became a victim of its own success. After obtaining landmark status, the neighborhood became more desirable, the rent skyrocketed and the restaurant was forced to close. During a question and answer session following the film I asked Morellet, who now sits on Manhattan Community Board 2, what he thought about the High Line and the influx of contemporary architecture to the area. Citing the Ennead designed Standard Hotel and SHoP's Porter House as great architecture in "conversation" with the neighborhood, he said that without it the Meat Market would look like an industrial neighborhood in any other city. As for being booted out by the high cost, he said "change is good" and that the city needed a strong center. "You have to remember when I came to New York the outer boroughs were burning," he said. As for those still mourning the loss of the grittiness, he chalked it up to "white, middle class nostalgia." He seemed assured that Williamsburg was having a good go of it, though nothing like Meat Market, which was the perfect storm of location, timing and people. Though he allowed that a cheap, centrally located spot like it might one day become available again... provided we "have a really good depression."  
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Say Goodbye to Your Gnome

What better way to usher out the profligate design culture of the Bush era than to have these Alien Gnome Bandits escort your Philippe Starck Gnome thingee back where it belongs--into the past. Utah artist Fred Conlon, who sculpts the bandits out of recycled metal, claims they are just the thing for your “helpless, hapless” and useless garden gnome.