Posts tagged with "Perkins + Will":

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Thursday> SMPS-NY Communications & Industry Leadership Awards Gala

AwardsGala2013_400x300 Tomorrow night SMPS-NY (Society for Marketing Professional Services) invites you to their Annual Awards Gala where they will proudly honor the outstanding achievements of members of the architecture, engineering, and construction industries by announcing the winners of the 2013 Communications & Industry Leadership Awards. This year a group of jurors, including Molly Heintz, Contributing Editor at The Architect's Newspaper, carefully sorted through 200 entries and selected six winners. This years winners include SBLM Architects for their Brand Identity, Hausman for their extraordinary Event/Holiday Piece, Perkins+ Will for their Marketing Campaign, and Dattner Architects for their website. Eric Schlau, Marketing Coordinator at MBI Group was the recipient of the Mary Findlen Professional Grant and Patricia Neumann, CPSM was awarded the Industry Leadership Award. The festive gala, which will be held at Providence, a spacious and elegant event-venue located near Columbus Circle, will feature a cocktail, beer and wine reception as well as a sit down dinner.
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Defrosting A Construction Site: Beautiful Ice Crystals Inside a Chicago Adaptive Reuse Project

Perkins+Will is designing one cool corporate headquarters for bike components manufacturer, SRAM, in Chicago's Fulton Market District. Located inside the 1K Fulton development by the Sterling Bay Companies, an adaptive reuse of a ten-story cold storage warehouse, two floors of offices will include bleacher seating for group meetings, a product development shop, and even an interior cycling test track. But before construction could begin, there was one small problem most architects rarely encounter: the construction site needed to be defrosted after essentially serving as a building-size refrigerator since 1923. After decades keeping fish and meets cold inside its insulated concrete walls, the Fulton Market Cold Storage Warehouse had developed a thick coating of ice forming a mesmerizing cavern of crystals, icicles, and eerie stalagmites rising up from the floor. As beautiful as the display might be, the ice was not conducive to modern office environments and had to go. Last November, propane heaters were brought in to help melt the ice and clear the site for construction. See the time lapse video of the melting in action below. Currently under construction, portions of the brick facade  will be peeled away, exposing the building's concrete frame and allowing for large windows to fill 1K Fulton's interior with daylight. Designed by Chicago-based Hartshorne Plunkard Architects, the ten-story warehouse will be flanked by a six-story annex structure bringing its total size to 545,000 square feet. The development has generated quite a bit of hype since it was announced, as rumors that Google would locate in the building swirled around the internet. To cater to creative and tech companies like SRAM Bikes, developers have included amenities like dedicated bike parking and even on-site bicycle detailing and repair. Watch a live construction feed on the project's website and check out more on the building's history at Edible Geography. [H/T Perkins+Will Blog]
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Chicago Architecture Foundation Honors Patrons of the Year

The end of the year is nigh, and the season of awards and lists is at hand. In addition to the AIA Chicago awards to be presented tonight, the Chicago Architecture Foundation this week announced their Patron of the Year Awards. “Good buildings only happen with good clients,” read a statement presented by Williams + Tsien at the ceremony. Great buildings, however, only happen when clients are “unreasonable” in their commitment to good design, the David & Reva Logan Center for the Arts architects said. The winning projects included the Logan Center, CTA’s Morgan Station (Ross Barney Architects), Inspiration Kitchens (Wheeler Kearns Architects), and Rush University Medical Center (Perkins + Will). CAF also awarded two honorable mentions: Morris Architect Planners’ Black Ensemble Theater Cultural Center, and JGMA’s Instituto del Progreso. Accepting her award for the West Loop’s new Morgan Station Green/Pink line stop, Carol Ross Barney said she wanted to debunk the axiom “good enough for government.” Transit projects are critical, she said: “This isn’t even a building. It’s the blood and guts of our city.”
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Slideshow> AIA Chicago Honors 39 Projects

Friday marked Designight 2012—AIA Chicago’s annual awards gala—which brought nearly 1,000 members of the area’s design community together at Navy Pier to recognize 39 projects in four awards categories: Distinguished Building, Interior Architecture, Divine Detail, and Sustainability Leadership. John Ronan’s Poetry Foundation; Perkins+Will’s Universidade Agostinho Neto in Luanda, Angola; Sheehan Partners’ Facebook Data Center in Prineville, Ore.; and David Woodhouse Architects’ Richard J. Daley Library IDEA Commons in Chicago (featured in the October Midwest issue of AN Midwest) were among the repeat winners of the night. Helmut Jahn accepted a lifetime achievement award, calling on the designers present to imagine a better future and then “make that future happen.” On behalf of his firm, Jahn also formally adopted the changes reported earlier—a new name, JAHN, and the ascension of Francisco Gonzalez-Pulido to share design leadership with Jahn. Click on a thumbnail to launch the slideshow. The full list of winners and all 262 projects entered into the competition can be found on AIA Chicago's website.
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An Award Winning Recyclable Ribbon of Celebration

ENfold Pavilion, a new temporary landscape installation designed by Perkins + Will in Boston’s Evans Way Park, utilizes natural reusable materials as its base and steers clear of harmful environmental impacts in both its construction and placement. The installation, which was chosen for Boston Society of Architects Unbuilt Design Award prior to being realized, celebrates the recent designation of Boston’s Fenway as Boston’s first state-wide cultural district The permeable light catching ribbon is made of garden bed-liner fabric and is held in place by an invisible network of stainless steel cables. Its organic free-flowing form mimes the grace and movement of the expanse of tree branches above and is loosely woven between their trunks. ENfold’s spatial layout delineates a natural framework for park-goers and creates a natural "stage" for musical performances and other art happenings. The 500 foot long semi-translucent fabric loops its way throughout the entire park echoing wind and light along its way. The fabric will be recycled and used for the Boston Parks Department’s 2013 growing season.

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Event> Oct 11-12: AN’s Facades & Fabrication Conference…And Look Who’s Coming!

Chicago's collective IQ, no doubt already impressive, may rise a few points even higher this Thursday and Friday. The city is hosting a gathering of international thinkers and innovators who specialize in the tools that enable the creation of some of the world's most high-tech and visually arresting building skins. The conference, Collaboration: The Art and Science of Building Facades, is sponsored by The Architect's Newspaper and Enclos. On Thursday, the conference features a high-powered line-up of speakers on Thursday, including Fernando Romero of FREE as the keynote. Then on Friday, the conference turns practical with a series of hands-on workshops that will lead participants through the very latest tools, programs, and applications. For example, Florin Isvoranu of Austria-based firm Evolute, which has collaborating with Zaha Hadid, Asymptote and others, will host a workshop on parametrically driven optimization of freeform facades, a topic that even has industry experts signing up to learn something new. From students to seasoned veterans, those currently attending include staffers from firms like Sapa, Thornton Tomasetti, Interface, Cannon Design, Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architcture, Perkins + Will, NBBJ, SOM, and KieranTimberlake, with roles ranging from engineer to BIM manager, market analyst to company president. PhD candidates, MArchs, and undergrads are flocking in from area universities and colleges including The School of the Art Institute, IIT, and Cranbrook Academy, as well as a hefty contingent of 12 students and three profs from the University of South Dakota State University's new Department of Architecture (DoArch). Collaboration is the industry conference you can't afford to miss. There's still time to sign up! Registration details here.
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Perkins+Will Talks Transparency

Poisonous substances are common in the built environment. Fred Bernstein of The New York Times quizzed Chris Youssef and Peter Syrett of Perkins+Will about their "Transparency" lists, an online database "linking common forms of flooring, lumber, wiring, pipes and other construction materials to government warnings about the substances contained in them." The site is divided into the "Precautionary List" (harmful substances commonly found in the built environment), a list of asthma triggers, a list of toxicity levels of commonly used flame retardants, and a list of lists (a resource library). It's a valuable tool for architects and designers; for lay users, it could become the WebMD for home and office ("Hey honey, did you know that a lot of treated wood contains arsenic?!")
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Buildings = Energy at the Center for Architecture

Amidst the event saturated month of Archtober and the holiday hubbub that followed, the Center for Architecture's fall show, Buildings = Energy, got a bit lost in the shuffle. But there's still time to check it out through January 12. Earlier this month Margaret O. Castillo took AN on a tour of the exhibit, the last under her tenure as AIANY chapter president. The show drives home several green points that Castillo has been hammering at all year, primarily the fact that buildings consume energy--a lot of it.  Eighty percent of greenhouse gas emissions come from buildings, and in New York City alone they use 94 percent of the power. The exhibit takes a holistic approach focusing on the amount of energy needed to extract and make materials, to the energy used to build, and the energy consumed by the completed structure. The story begins in the front window with calculations of how much oil it takes to produce a typical building material. Suspended from the ceiling are aluminum, cinder blocks, lumber, bricks, and sheetrock. Each material has a barrel ring floating around it with figures printed on them, such as: "1 gallon of oil = 3.33 CU. FT. of hardwood." The calculation includes the energy to fell the tree, transport it, and cut it to size.  The Mayor's Office of Long Term Planning and Sustainability, ARUP, and Dattner Architects lent their expertise to arrive at the various figures found throughout the exhibit, lending the heft of real world numbers to the theoretical aspects of the show. The main theoretical voice comes from Perkins+Will in a section of the exhibit called One Building = Many Choices. Through a series of renderings the firm explores key factors from building concept to completion that include: Site Choices, Program Choices, Passive Systems Choices, Active Systems Choices, Materials Choices, Construction Choices, Operational Choices. Each section is deserving of in depth analysis, but the Passive System attracted our attention because of the design of the building's envelope, about which the team from Perkins+Will had the luxury of dreaming big without a client screaming "How much?!" Thus an elaborate customized photovoltaic facade zigzags down the face of the building. It may cost upfront, but the returns are obvious. “I’m imagining the day when buildings will produce energy, not use energy,” said Castillo. Anthony Fieldman, design principal at P+W, noted that the curtain wall is "the only membrane between you and an uncontrolled environment. So if you use it intelligently you can temper nature's forces before they become problems you have to deal with in the interior." Fieldman added that the geometry of the facade was designed to maximize light, minimize solar heat gain, and maximize energy though the PVs. The photovoltaic facade drew questions of customized photovoltaics vs. mass produced ones.  To which Castillo argues that architects should be pushing for the industry to create more choice. "We should be pushing for better looking photovoltaics, instead of just the flat black photovoltaics on the roof," she said. Elsewhere in the exhibit, plenty of real world projects illustrate the show's values. An air circulation animation produced by Buro Happold Consulting Engineers of Pelli Clark Pelli's Transbay Center in San Francisco demonstrates both passive and active systems working together for temperature control and air flow (see below). A model of City College's entry for the Solar Decathlon, the so-called Rooftop Pod, is also on display. And there are several examples of adaptive reuse, including a project that Castillo worked on with Helpern Architects for Columbia's Knox Hall. To avoid rooftop disruption, the school drilled 1,800 feet into the ground for geothermal heating and cooling. It all adds up to a message that Castillo delivers with nearly evangelical fervor: "If we can reduce the energy use in buildings you wouldn’t have to build new power plants, we wouldn't need transmission lines that are loosing electricity. It we got rid of fossil fuels, we wouldn’t be shipping it around the world, we wouldn’t be polluting the gulf with oil spills. So much could be solved at building level if we really concentrated."    
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SHFT+ALT+DEL: October 28

Cecilia Alemani has been named the new curator and director of the High Line Art Program.  Previously, Alemani had worked as an independent curator and writer, and is currently a guest curator for the upcoming Performa 11. Lucinda Sanders has been named the 2012 President of the Landscape Architecture Foundation.  Her tenure will begin on October 30, 2011 at the American Society of Landscape Architects’ (ASLA) annual meeting.  Sanders is the CEO and a partner at OLIN. The Washington, DC office of Perkins Eastman has announced that J. Scott Kilbourn will join as a Principal and Chief Operating Officer.  Kilbourn has more than 28 years of design and planning experience.  Most recently, he was Vice President at RTKL where he worked in Hong Kong, Shanghai, Tokyo, and DC. Suanne Bassett, principal of Suba—Connecting through Architecture and Interior Design, is re-launching her firm.  Bassett, who is licensed in California and New York, returns to her own practice after several years of collaborating with local San Francisco Bay Area firms. Corey Martin has been named principal at Portland firm THA Architecture.  Previously, Martin worked at Richard Potestio and Allied Works before co-founding Portland-based PATH Architecture with partner Ben Kaiser in 2005. Perkins+Will has announced that Wayne Perlenfein has joined the firm as prinicipal and will focus on federal government in the Washington DC office.  Previously, Perlenfein ran his own firm of Rogers, Perlenfein & Associates and was also the jurisdiction executive and senior program manager for planning, design and construction for the Architect of the Capitol in Washington DC. The Center for Curatorial Leadership (CCL) in New York City has announced its 2012 class of fellows. The program spans four weeks and includes instruction by Columbia Business School faculty, a six-month mentorship, a week-long museum residency, and long-term team-based project. Have news on movers and shakers in the architecture & design universe for SHFT+ALT+DEL? Send your tips to people@archpaper.com!
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Buildings=Energy exhibit to kickstart Archtober!

In New York City, buildings account for almost 80 percent of greenhouse gas emissions and 95 percent of electricity use. It was these facts like these that prompted the Center for Architecture to further investigate the urban energy crisis and display the findings--and potential solutions--in an exhibit entitled Buildings=Energy. The exhibit, which opens on the evening of October 1st, explores how important choices made by designers, planners, architects, and building occupants can positively affect energy consumption in our cities. One such example featured in the exhibition is a model building designed by the firm Perkins+Will, whose proposal demonstrates the significance of site planning, materials, programs and their affects on energy costs. For instance, as firm principal Anthony Fieldman explains, tilting the exterior glass by only 10 degrees towards the street prevents a substantial amount of solar heat gains, saving the building on cooling costs throughout the summer months. Other highlights of the exhibit can be viewed from the sidewalk. The attention of passersby on LaGuardia Place will be caught by a display of nine building materials suspended in the Center's window, each representing the embodied energy of one gallon of oil--just a preview of the striking visuals on view inside. The Center for Architecture's kick off-event is presented as part of Archtober, the inaugural month-long festival of architecture activities, programs, and exhibitions in New York City.
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Presenting the Winners of the AIA SF Awards

On Thursday, the architecturati were at the War Memorial Performing Arts Center's Green Room to see who won in this year's AIA SF Awards. This year only saw 27 awards presented, half the number of last year's 54--perhaps an indication of how hard the economic downturn has hit this area. But despite the shorter program, there was no shortage of distinctive projects. Taking home top honors in the Architecture category was Ogrydziak Prillinger's Gallery House (photo at top), which impressed the jury for its "reinterpretation of the San Francisco bay window," among other things. Alas, the  images that were shown while the virtues of the house were being described were of HOK's Merit-winning library in Saudi Arabia,  the one glitch in the evening. Interestingly, the other Honor winner for Architecture was EHDD's Marin Country Day School, which is not only a graceful building rendered in wood and steel, it is also net-zero-energy and LEED Platinum. Since EHDD got the nod for Architecture, as opposed to Energy + Sustainability, it's a indication that the profession is starting to value design and sustainability together as a package. Mark Cavagnero's sensitive additions to the Oakland Museum of California and Perkins+Will's careful restoration of the Presidio Landmark were singled out in the historical preservation category. This category is a recent addition to the awards lineup, but one that should continue to have some great entries. In interiors, an amused murmur went up in the crowd when they learned about Sand Studios' medical marijuana dispensary, SPARC, which took home a Citation award.  But the biggest laugh of the evening came when the picturesque Honor winner for unbuilt work was announced: Anderson Anderson Architecture's Lips Tower, described as a "thirsty urban utility, sucking water and solar energy from the sky."
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Five Top Firms Looking for Summer Interns

As spring rolls around, deadlines loom for coveted summer internships. AN has collected a list of five prestigious firms that are looking for their 2011 class of interns. Good luck! 1. Skidmore, Owings and Merrill LLP Deadline: April 4, 2011 SOM has designed some of the most iconic buildings of our time, from the John Hancock Center and the Sears Tower to Burj Khalifa in Dubai. Send your cover letter, resume and 5-8 work samples (8.5” x 11”) to SOM’s Human Resources Department at 14 Wall Street, 24th Floor, New York, NY 10005. Only hard copy submissions will be considered. 2. Gensler Deadline: rolling Gensler is offering several internships in architecture, interior design, marketing, graphics and planning in Dallas, Newport Beach, San Diego, LA, Denver, Houston, and Morristown, NJ offices. Most of the internships listed online are accepting students enrolled in professional degree programs only, but check the qualifications on the company’s career website. 3. Perkins+Will Deadline: April 22 for architecture internships in Atlanta and NYC, but deadlines are specific to each types of internship. Perkins+Will’s portfolio includes Chase Tower in Chicago and Antilia in Mumbai, a 27-story structure that’s one of the most expensive personal homes in the world. The firm’s paid internship program currently has five openings in interiors, architecture and urban design+landscape architecture. The internships are based out of in their Atlanta and NYC offices. Submit one complete PDF with a cover letter, resume, and up to a total of three pages of design examples no larger than 4MB through the company’s website. 4. HOK Deadline: rolling HOK has openings for summer architectural interns in its St. Louis and Chicago offices. Interns will have to opportunity to 2D and 3D presentation/design drawings, and create models/project boards for client and project team review. According to the website, the full-time summer internships are generally paid. The firm also offers a sustainable design internship program. Apply online. 5. OMA Deadline: rolling Last week, OMA announced two new internship opportunities. The Dutch firm is looking for a business development intern and a model shop intern for their Rotterdam office. They also have model shop and architectural internships available in their New York office. Internships in both departments are paid.