Posts tagged with "Perkins Eastman":

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City Council Gives Staten Island’s New York Wheel the Green Light

It is official. The world's tallest Ferris wheel will rise on Staten Island's waterfront. Today, New York City Council approved the New York Wheel, a mixed-use development project, designed by Perkins Eastman. The project will include a 100,000-square foot Terminal building in addition to retail, restaurants, open space, entertainment, and a 950-parking garage. The structure will implement green design strategies and  feature wind turbines and solar panels. Construction will commence in 2014 and be completed by 2016.

 
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Welcome to Staten Eye-Land: World’s Tallest Ferris Wheel to Anchor New Waterfront Development

Today, thousands of tourists and New Yorkers make a loop on the Staten Island Ferry between the borough and Manhattan, but as soon as 2016, they will also be able to make a vertical loop on the world's tallest Ferris wheel, anchoring a new mixed-use project on the North Shore waterfront in St. George. Mayor Bloomberg today unveiled plans for Harbor Commons, which includes 350,000 square feet of retail space for 100 outlet mall stores, a 200-room, 120,000 square foot hotel, and a massive green-roofed parking structure, but all eyes were on the project's neighbor; the 625-foot-tall New York Wheel will offer stunning views of New York City and its Harbor to an estimated 4.5 million people per year. The Harbor Commons and New York Wheel developments flank the Richmond County Bank Ballpark, home of the minor league Staten Island Yankees, and rise from the site of two large surface parking lots at the ferry landing. SHoP Architects with Lee Weintraub Landscape Architects designed the $230 million mixed-use outlet mall-entertainment-hotel complex at Harbor Commons to relate to the surrounding Staten Island community while still providing a monumental presence on the waterfront and ferry landing. "At SHoP, we like taking typologies traditionally considered suburban or car-dominated and turning them inside out, making them urban in their experience" said Vishaan Chakrabarti, principal at SHoP. "It's not a mall in the traditional sense." A series of undulating ribbon-like green roof structures are arrayed at Harbor Commons to define three open-air pedestrian corridors through the site. Each ribbon is punctuated by grids skylights where north-south passages connect the corridors. "It's about organizing pedestrian corridors," said Chakrabarti. "We looked to create a contemporary version of an Italian hill town. The great hill towns have interesting spines." Floor plates gradually shift as the site negotiates a 25-foot grade change. Facade treatments and materials are still being determined, but will reflect the industrial waterfront site. Chakrabarti said SHoP is exploring a signage and art program that will enliven the waterfront facade. "As day turns to night, the ribbons' presence on the waterfront is elevated as they start to glow." Chakrabarti said. Whatever the final design, however, it "needs to be respectful of the waterfront." The Ferris wheel on the north side of the ballpark will take the world's tallest title, topping the current title holder, the Singapore Flyer, by 84 feet and dwarfing other iconic wheels like the London Eye which stands just over 440 feet tall. The $250 million wheel will contain 36 football-shaped pods carrying 40 passengers each for the 38 minute ride. The NYC Economic Development Corporation estimated that at peak season the wheel will spin up to 30,000 visitors a day. The New York Wheel's resemblance to its London equivalent is more than passing; it's being designed by Starneth, whose team includes members who built the Eye. "This wheel is a game changer for Staten Island," said Staten Island borough president James Molinaro in a statement. "Going forward, Staten Island will be known as the Borough with the largest wheel in the world." Surrounding the New York Wheel, a 100,000 square foot commercial terminal building designed by Perkins Eastman continues the theme of green ribbon roofs, adding an array of wind turbines and solar panels to generate sustainable energy for what's envisioned as a LEED Platinum facility. The structure will include restaurant, retail, theater, and exhibition space over a nearly 1,000-car parking structure. New York Wheel and BFC Partners will sign a 99-year lease for the two development sites, paying the city $2.5 million per year, and plan to begin construction in early 2014 with an anticipated opening in 2016.
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Willets Point Brings Retail Revelry, Puts Housing on Back Burner

Mayor Bloomberg evoked Fitzgerald today when he announced the deal between Sterling Equities and Related Companies to revamp Willets Point. "Today the 'valley of ashes' is well on its way to becoming the site of historic private investment," the mayor said in a statement, referring to the gritty midpoint between Gatsby's West Egg manse and Manhattan. The plan pegs its success to a  mega entertainment/retail hub just west of the stadium, that sounds very much a part of a trend in projects that used to be called malls, but are now called retail/entertainment attractions (see also the aptly named American Dream in NJ). Willets West, as the new complex will be called, promises to convert a former parking lot into more than one million square feet of retail, movie theaters, restaurants, venues, and, of course, parking. But before that the city will spend $100 million east side of the site in demolition and cleanup of the former auto repair shops and junk yards, and then install much needed basic infrastructure. The city is already installing $50 million worth of sewers. Also east of the stadium, the Sterling/Related partnership, called the Queens Development Corporation, will begin developing the 126th Street corridor, where a 200 room hotel will abut 30,000 square feet of retail and a twenty acre interim parking lot. After all that is done, then comes the housing. The Willets Point Community, as it is to be called, will have 4.5 million square feet of mixed-use development. This phase of the project will include construction of the Van Wyck Expressway's access ramps that city got approval for in April. Another 900,000 square feet of street level retail will meet 500,000 square feet of office space, another hotel, and 2,500 units of housing, of which 35 percent will be affordable. That the housing comes so late in the game has got more than few politians up up in arms. The Daily News reported early this week that City Coucilmember Karen Koslowitz was not pleased. It's a pretty sensitive topic that was initially raises in The Wall Street Journal last month, which cited Willets Point and Atlantic Yards as examples of where housing was used to win favor with the locals but ends up being the last component of the project scheduled for completion.  
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SHFT+ALT+ DEL: June 1, 2012

D.B. Kim has joined Daroff Design as a principal and will lead the firm's luxury hotel and resort practice. Kim was previously at Pierre-Yves Rochon and prior to that at Starwood Hotels and Resorts. Design Trust for Public Space's executive director Susan Chin was elected Vice President of the 2013-2014 AIA National Board at the recent national convention in Washington, D.C. Al Eiber, a Miami-based physician and collector of 20th century design, has been appointed to the Board of Trustees of the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum. Steven Gifford has joined the New York office of Perkins Eastman as a principal. Gifford was previously led the Global Science and Health Design Studio at Hillier. Ennead Architects  has promoted Guy Maxwell and Thomas Wong to partners. Maxwell has been with the firm since 1994 and Wong since 1993. Have news on movers and shakers in the architecture & design universe for SHFT+ALT+DEL? Send your tips to people@archpaper.com.
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SHFT+ALT+DEL: October 28

Cecilia Alemani has been named the new curator and director of the High Line Art Program.  Previously, Alemani had worked as an independent curator and writer, and is currently a guest curator for the upcoming Performa 11. Lucinda Sanders has been named the 2012 President of the Landscape Architecture Foundation.  Her tenure will begin on October 30, 2011 at the American Society of Landscape Architects’ (ASLA) annual meeting.  Sanders is the CEO and a partner at OLIN. The Washington, DC office of Perkins Eastman has announced that J. Scott Kilbourn will join as a Principal and Chief Operating Officer.  Kilbourn has more than 28 years of design and planning experience.  Most recently, he was Vice President at RTKL where he worked in Hong Kong, Shanghai, Tokyo, and DC. Suanne Bassett, principal of Suba—Connecting through Architecture and Interior Design, is re-launching her firm.  Bassett, who is licensed in California and New York, returns to her own practice after several years of collaborating with local San Francisco Bay Area firms. Corey Martin has been named principal at Portland firm THA Architecture.  Previously, Martin worked at Richard Potestio and Allied Works before co-founding Portland-based PATH Architecture with partner Ben Kaiser in 2005. Perkins+Will has announced that Wayne Perlenfein has joined the firm as prinicipal and will focus on federal government in the Washington DC office.  Previously, Perlenfein ran his own firm of Rogers, Perlenfein & Associates and was also the jurisdiction executive and senior program manager for planning, design and construction for the Architect of the Capitol in Washington DC. The Center for Curatorial Leadership (CCL) in New York City has announced its 2012 class of fellows. The program spans four weeks and includes instruction by Columbia Business School faculty, a six-month mentorship, a week-long museum residency, and long-term team-based project. Have news on movers and shakers in the architecture & design universe for SHFT+ALT+DEL? Send your tips to people@archpaper.com!
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SHFT+ALT+DEL> Design Moves for 10.14.2011

WXY appointed Adam Lubinsky as principal. Lubinsky received a Ph.D. in Planning and Urban Design from the University College London, where he also has been teaching. Ben Bischoff is taking over operations at MADE as the sole principal of the company. Bischoff co-founded MADE with Oliver Freundlich and Brian Papa, who are both departing to "pursue individual interests." Ray Huff has been named director of the Clemson Architecture Center in Charleston. Huff was the founding director of the Charleston program when it was initiated in 1987 and has served as an instructor there for much of the time since. J. Scott Kibourn has been appointed Principal and Chief Operating Officer of Perkins Eastman's international operations. CENTRIA Metal Architectural Systems has named Tom White Design and Development leader. White was previously Corporate Director for Business Development at the architectural firm Burt Hill. HR&A is opening an office in Washington, D.C. and welcoming back Lionel Lynch as the principal leading the effort. SmithGroup has tapped Paul Johnson, FAIA, who has been with the firm since 1986, to lead the firm’s Building Technology Studio in Detroit. Have news on movers and shakers in the architecture & design universe for SHFT+ALT+DEL? Send your tips to people@archpaper.com!
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LPC Approves Plans for Ol’ O’Toole

After a protracted land use review with vitriolic community meetings that disquieted even battle-hardened presenters, the Landmarks Preservation Commission finally approved plans by the Rudin development family and North Shore Long Island Jewish Medical to renovate the St. Vincent’s O’Toole building in Manhattan's West Village. As of Tuesday, the former Maritime Union headquarters is set to become a comprehensive health care facility with emergency services. "Today's vote is further recognition that the North Shore-LIJ Comprehensive Care Center is not only the best plan to bring health care back to the West Side, but the right one for the neighborhood,” Rudin Management CEO Bill Rudin said in a statement. Renovations by Perkins Eastman will preserve much of the original design by architect Albert C. Ledner. "The interesting point is that we are adaptively reusing a 1960's building and turning it into a 21st century medical facility," said Frank Gunther, principal at Perkins Eastman. "We're fitting a square into a circle." The final proposal also addressed concerns by commissioners and several preservationists that the cantilevered overhang not be undermined. Original designs included a ground floor glass wall that practically merged with the overhang on the building’s west side. The approved design pulls the glass wall back away from the second floor while gently curving toward the north entrance, which will be used for the medical offices. The south side of the building will be carved out to provide privacy for the ambulance entrance, while the east side of the building facing Seventh Avenue will remain largely unchanged with new glass block replacing the old, aiding the illusion of a substantial rectangular mass floating above a glass base. Atop the building, a large modernist turret and old executive office space will be restored and converted into medical offices. Perhaps the most substantial change will be the removal of the tiny-tile cladding, which was added by the client shortly after the building was completed in 1963. The new façade will sport a fresh coat of white paint the color of vanilla ice cream, as Ledner had always intended. “It was an ill fated application,” Gunther, said of the tiles. “We plan to restore it to the original concrete finish, similar to what they did at the Guggenheim a few years ago.” Gunther said the firm received Ledner’s blessing on the restoration after extensive consultations with the architect. The team even made a pilgrimage to visit the 87-year-old Ledner who accompanied them to his archives at Tulane University.
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Interrogating Plans for St. Vincents

Presenting to the community board has got be one of the toughest parts of an architect's job. The mood in the room at last night's CB2 meeting for St. Vincent's Campus Redevelopment Project was cantankerous at best. The public scoping meeting, one of the first steps in the review process, gave an overview of the building massing on the site and delved into environmental impacts. Time for community input was scheduled to follow the developers' presentations, but that didn't stop the crowd from shouting down Perkins Eastman's Frank Gunther and FX Fowle's Dan Kaplan. As Kaplan worked his way through his presentation he was interrupted with shouts of "Soulless architecture for soulless people." They were no kinder to Gunther, who discussed several details of the O'Toole renovations, including the removal of the ceramic tiles.  Gunther said the tiles were not original to the building's facade, which was concrete. After the presentations, members of the community board teased out details in the plan from the presenters. One specific question dealt with the air rights at the site. As the plan worked its way through Landmarks, air rights above O'Toole were shifted to the East Campus. As those designs were reduced in mass to comply with Landmarks' requests, the air rights reverted back to O'Toole and the triangular property at Seventh Avenue and Greenwich Avenue. The current plan calls for the triangle to become a park. But for the purpose of rezoning, Melanie Meyers, a land use lawyer from Fried Frank representing the Rudin family, said that the triangle ends up with 150,000 square feet in air rights and O'Toole gets about 100,000 square feet. Representatives from North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System said there are no plans to build atop the O'Toole building. But one community board member reminded the development team that they were not voting on North Shore's stay at the site, but future owners as well. After losing St. Vincent's, it would seem that this community isn't leaving anything to chance.  
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Pittsburgh Riverfront Revival

Last week, Pittsburgh Mayor Luke Ravenstahl unveiled a plan to resuscitate 2,000 acres of brownfield property alongside the Allegheny River. The report, the Allegheny Riverfront Vision Plan, follows a two-year study headed up by Perkins Eastman. Much of the planning sprung from meetings with the resident and business communities, and aims to connect neighborhoods to the river for the first time. Cities throughout the country continue to reclaim their rivers, but Pittsburgh’s situation is unique. “The neighborhoods were built to serve industry not the river,” said Stephen Quick, a principal at Perkins Eastman. “You don’t even see the river from the communities. This was not Savannah.” While much of Pittsburgh maintains waterfront access, Quick said the city did not have a vision plan for areas upriver from Downtown. The new plan encompasses five neighborhoods that face the river, from Downtown to Highland Park. But the neighborhoods sit further inland, as industry preferred the flat riverside land for factories and the waterfront access for hauling and dumping. Street grids and sidewalks stop at the factory door. For generations of Pittsburghers, the river was a facility, in more ways than one. In addition to serving as an industrial transitway, the river was an integral part of the city's sewers system. Today, Pittsburgh employs a Combined Sewer Outlet system to handle both sanitary and rainwater runoff. Overflow spills into the Allegheny. The design team knew the system could handle the sanitary use, so the recommendations focused on employing pervious surfaces, creating green streets and planting brownfields and alleyways to absorb runoff. It’s a method that has gained traction in policy and planning elsewhere. Park departments in New York and Philadelphia both released similar documents over the past three months. The Pittsburgh plan has already attracted the attention of the Federal government, which awarded the city’s Urban Redevelopment Authority $1.5 million in TIGER II funds to further study transforming a freight rail bed into a “rail-with-trail green boulevard”.  The line will become the green spine connecting the five neighborhoods along the river. Culturally, however, it may take time for a public that has never really thought of its riverfront as a playground. “We’ve begun to get good access by putting in trails that are very close to the river, but there’s still a lot of industry on the edge,” said Quick. “It’s a real cultural shift.”
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Perkins Eastman Getting Together with EE&K

Perkins Eastman confirmed today that the global practice is merging with Ehrenkrantz Eckstut & Kuhn and the firms will be consolidating their offices in New York, Washington, D.C., and China.  When the merger is complete, the new firm - yet to be named - will have a total of nearly 600 employees, 500 from Perkins Eastman and 85 from EE&K.  Steven Yates with Perkins Eastman says no major layoffs have taken place in the past nine months and the company is not planning any layoffs as part of the merger. Perkins Eastman is the designer behind Times Square's glowing red stairs and a mega-project in Queens while EE&K has been busy master planning Cleveland's waterfront.  Anyone care to take a guess at the new firm's name?
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Gateway Of India

The past ten years have seen an impressive amount of economic growth and infrastructural development in India, and the nation is becoming more and more a well established market for American architectural talent. This trend doesn't seem to be changing as we embark on a new decade. One sign of that is the September 2009 opening of an office in Mumbai by structural engineering firm Leslie E. Robertson Associates (LERA). Founded in 1923 in New York City, LERA has contributed its services to many of the city's iconic structures (such as the World Trade Center) and has designed buildings all around the world, but this will be its first foreign office. A release by the firm cited a "growing workload" and the need to "facilitate client relations" as key reasons for the opening. LERA will join a number of other American architecture firms that have recently opened branches in the subcontinent, including HOK and Perkins Eastman. See some of the projects LERA has worked on after the jump.
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Fleeting Image

Today we got an email from the fine folks at Archphoto announcing that one of its trio of photographers, Paúl Rivera, has been featured in the current issue of the Japanese architecture magazine, A+U. The featured work was of the MASterworks award-winning TKTS Booth, including the above photo. In addition to being an unexpected and breathtaking view of the structure and surrounding environs, it made us realize something we hadn't yet about the much-talked about closure of Broadway in the square: While all those cars whizzing by may have been a pedestrian and congestion nightmare, they sure brought wonderful life to the countless photos that have come to define the Crossroads of the World.