Posts tagged with "Pedro Gadanho":

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Madrid’s Andres Jacque wins MoMA PS1 2015 Young Architects Program

MoMA and MoMA PS 1 have announced the winner of the 2015 Young Architects Program from a shortlist of five firms: Andres Jacque Architects/Office for Political Innovation. Based in Madrid and New York, Jacque's firm will build COSMO, a large structure made of irrigation tubes and planted zones, which will make the process of water filtration visible to PS 1 visitors. The structure will contain 3,000 gallons of water which will take four days to complete the cycle of purification through the structure. Seating and performance areas will be located underneath the suspended structure, which, when illuminated at night, will become a beacon in the neighborhood. The project is intended as a prototype, which could be recreated anywhere in the world to create fresh drinking water. "This year's proposal takes one of the Young Architects Program's essential requirements—providing a water feature for leisure and fun—and highlights water itself as a scarce resource," said Pedro Gadanho, a curator of architecture and design at MoMA, in a statement. "Relying on off-the-shelf components from agro-industrial origin, an exuberant mobile architecture celebrates water-purification processes and turns their intricate visualization into an unusual backdrop." COSMO will open in late June as a part of the annual Warm Up summer party series at MoMA PS 1. The Young Architects Program has become on the world's leading showcases for emerging architectural talent.
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SHFT+ALT+DLT: December 23

Portuguese architect, curator, and writer Pedro Gadanho will join the Museum of Modern Art’s Department of Architecture and Design as a curator of contemporary architecture effective January 11. In addition to organizing exhibitions, Gadanho will supervise the annual Young Architect's Program, which has recently expanded from New York to Rome and Chile. Read more details in AN's breaking news story. In other museum news, James Cuno, the President and CEO of the J. Paul Getty Trust, has taken on yet another Getty role: acting director of the Getty Museum. In addition to supervising all of the Getty's various holdings, Cuno, the former director of the Art Institute of Chicago, will now be back in familiar territory, overseeing the museum following the resignation of acting director David Bomford. Other West Coast shifts: Behnisch Architekten closes their Venice, CA office, while Oakland, California-based VDK Architects, which specializes in the Science & Technology market sector, has merged with the architecture and engineering practice Harley Ellis Devereaux. More mergers back East:Electric Lighting Agencies and O’Blaney Rinker Associates are joining forces and combining their lighting and control system specification businesses in New York City. Dwell magazine regrouped this fall following the departure of editor-in-chief Sam Grawe and also established a New York editorial outpost; executive editor Amanda Dameron was promoted to editor-in-chief and Alejandro Chavetta was bumped up from art director to creative director. Kelsey Keith departed Curbed NY to join Dwell as a New York-based senior editor.
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MoMA Taps Pedro Gadanho as Curator of Contemporary Architecture

The Museum of Modern Art has confirmed that the Portuguese architect, curator, and writer Pedro Gadanho will join  MoMA's Department of Architecture and Design as a curator of contemporary architecture. According to MoMA's release: "In his new role, Mr. Gadanho will be responsible for a broad portfolio that reinforces the Museum's commitment, since 1932, to contemporary architecture. In addition to building the Museum's holdings of contemporary architecture, he will oversee the annual Young Architects Program (YAP), co-organized with MoMA PS1, and the two-year-old YAP International Program in conjunction with the MAXXI in Rome and Constructo in Santiago, Chile; organize further exhibitions in the Museum's "Issues in Contemporary Architecture" series; and develop larger scale exhibitions of contemporary architecture, including exhibitions that explore relationships between architecture and other contemporary art practices." Gadanho holds a masters in Architecture from the University of Porto, a masters in Art and Architecture from the U.K.'s Kent Institute of Design, and a Ph.D. in Architecture and Mass Media from the University of Porto, where he has also served on the faculty of Architecture (FAUP).  He has curated numerous architecture exhibitions in Europe, including Portugal's entry for the 2004 Venice Biennale. “Pedro is a talented and innovative curator and a tireless advocate for contemporary practice,” said Barry Bergdoll, MoMA's chief curator of architecture and design. “As a key liaison between the Museum and academics, practitioners, and partner organizations, he will solidify our role as an international showcase for the most innovative contemporary architects, and will help us develop positions of relevance in contemporary architecture in exhibitions and programs.” Gadanho will officially take up the MoMA post January 11.
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Lisbon 2010> Pedro Gadanho's Inside Story

The Lisbon Architecture Triennale may have aspirations to international importance, but is really more interesting for what it says about the city’s potential as a regional center rather than a world city like London or New York (more on that in my next post). While most of the Triennale’s three major exhibitions take place in large public event spaces, there is one “official” ancillary event in a small commercial art gallery that has something to contribute to the world architecture scene. The show Interiors is at the Cristina Guerra gallery on Rua de Santo António à Estrela, which seemed to be an out-of-the-way residential neighborhood, but I was told that it is the most important international gallery in Portugal. The exhibition features the interior design work of Portuguese architect Pedro Gadanho, who also serves—not always a good idea—as his own curator. But Gadanho has been asking artists for at least 10 years to document his own design work, and has been smart in his selection of collaborators. The work on the walls is allowed to showcase the artists’ conceptions and insights alongside Gadanho’s interior design. He claims his work is about “difference, intimacy, and desire,” and this does come out in the work, which includes a video, two photography installations, and a wall-hung paper construction. While the video by Filipa Cesar carefully and beautifully tracks the minute details of a domestic storage room, the color photographs of Casa Baltasar by Fernando Guerra foreground the details of a house Gadanho designed for a bachelor. In one image, a bright forest-green kitchen leads into a red wall, the entrance for a bright red bedroom shown in the image next to it—just the “desire” of every bachelor’s dreams. There are also two abstract yet architectural images of the Elipse Foundation, designed by Gadanho in 2006, and a seductive, lozenge-like view of a bathroom by Edgar Martin. I have never visited any of the interiors in the show, so am not sure if they fulfill the designer’s claim (this is where an independent curator would have been helpful) to “difference and desire” in his work. But here on the walls of the gallery, the artists aptly make his case for him.