Posts tagged with "Pavilion":

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Color Palace by British designers Pricegore and Yinka Ilori wins the Dulwich Pavilion 2019 competition

Emerging British architecture office Pricegore and British artist Yinka Ilori were announced as winners of the annual Dulwich Pavilion for their design named Color Palace. The eye-catching and colorful pavilion will come to life next summer. The pavilion will feature a Nigerian-inspired artwork by Ilori, who is influenced by the African aesthetics of his childhood. The 2019 Pavilion will house “new ticketing facilities, a pop-up catering offer and a range of events over the summer,” according to a statement from Dulwich Picture Gallery. The project is co-hosted by the London Festival of Architecture, which is an annual event that celebrates London as a global design hub. The pavilion was chosen by a jury, along with a “combined public vote,” which garnered more than 2,000 votes from visitors on-site. Pricegore and Ilori's design won over other entries from young practices including Casswell Bank Architects, e10 Studio, Flea Folly Architects, Projects Office, and PUP Architects, which won the most public votes. The pavilion's screen is composed of slats painted with circular and triangular patterns in contrasting colors supported by massive, bright red columns on the corners. The space beneath is meant for informal gathering. Dulwich Pavilion is an annual competition that will be "at the heart of the gallery's bicentenary celebrations." Last year, the inaugural pavilion was won by IF_DO, a 2014-founded British practice.
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The Very Many brings an undulating canopy to El Paso

  New York-based studio The Very Many has designed and built a sinuous canopy that hovers over the entrance to a public pool in El Paso, Texas with In*Situ Architecture working as the architect-of-record. Dubbed 'Marquise', the canopy creates an entry structure for El Paso’s Westside Natatorium. The design studio, led by Marc Fornes, with engineering from LaufsED, formed a self-supporting structure made of gridded, curvilinear panels. There are hundreds of lightweight aluminum shingles that form a larger surface, with gaps in between to produce a dappled lighting effect below. A diamond-like pattern in gradients of rich yellows and deep blues plays off the “fluctuations between warm and cool” of the desert setting and is meant to “saturate the palette of the surrounding landscape.” The curved surfaces create an impression of a billowing tent rising from the ground, where it then organically forms two seats that are actually cast-in-place concrete elements. From the organic form of the awning, visitors have a unique spatial experience with alternating sensations of warmth and coolness, light and shade. The Very Many is known for designing and building thin-shell pavilions and installations. In the same vein, Marquis achieves its thinness through compound curvature and structural shingles in two different thicknesses: 1/8 inch at its thinnest and 3/16 inch for reinforcement and resistance to point loads. The name Marquise references the structure's 21st century play on the Art Nouveau entrance, which is historically classified as a curvilinear steel frame and glass awning that is either attached to buildings or freestanding. Here, aluminum replaces the glass-and-steel frame to create a unified structure.  
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Francis Kéré to design reflection pavilion at the Tippet Rise Art Center in Montana

Berlin, Germany-based architect Francis Kéré has unveiled renderings for a planned musical pavilion set for the Tippet Rise Art Center in Montana. The free-form 1,900-square-foot pavilion is designed to provide refuge in the forest while mimicking surrounding trees through the use of locally-logged ponderosa pine and lodgepole pine timbers. The structure's rounded surfaces and a sculptural drop-down ceiling are meant to echo the traditional designs of tongunas, sacred shelters built using wooden pillars and carved ornamentation by the Dogon culture of Mali. The pavilion will be accessed on the heavily-wooded site by a thin path and a circular bridge that meanders over meadows, a stream, and forested areas. The passage is designed to only touch down on at two points in order to minimize the installation's intrusion on the natural landscape. Inside the pavilion, integrated seating will provide views of the internal structure, including the sculptural ceiling, which is made up of the aforementioned dropped-down logs that create a so-called "rain of light" effect when they are illuminated by the low-lying sun. Laura Viklund Gunn of Gunnstock Timber Frames will collaborate with Kéré and his team as the local project architect. In the past, Viklund has helped to construct a variety of other installations at the arts center. Regarding the project, Kéré said, “Standing on the high meadow of Tippet Rise Art Center, looking out at the mountains under a vast sky, people can face nature at its widest scale. But with this pavilion, Tippet Rise offers a more intimate experience of its landscape within a quiet shelter, where people can access the most secret part of nature: the heart of the trees." In conjunction with the project, the Tippet Rise Fund will provide financial support for the construction of a new school building in Burkina Faso, Kéré’s native country. The woody pavilion is scheduled for completion at the start of Tippet's summer 2019 program.
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A James Turrell “Skyspace” pavilion will land at the Philadelphia Museum of Art

A permanent James Turrell pavilion will be coming to the Philadelphia Museum of Art, although critics initially raised questions of its appropriateness, according to the Philadelphia Inquirer.

The City of Philadelphia's Historical Commission approved the installation of the modern pavilion last month, paving a spot for the artist to build on an iconic rocky outcrop behind the museum. The pavilion is being built with Philadelphia-based KSK Architects and is a part of Turrell’s Skyspace series. Every Skyspace varies, but they all feature a proportioned chamber with an aperture in the ceiling and computerized light installations that are meant to evoke meditation and contemplation.

This new pavilion will be a free-standing structure with an opening in the canopy for a framed view of the sky. A twice-daily show at sunrise and sunset with colored lights will be projected onto the underside of the canopy. There are already two other pavilions on the outcrop, and Turrell’s will be the third—a modern, 21st-century piece. It is being paid for by an anonymous donor and is only the second commission the museum has installed (the first being Sol Lewitt’s garden composition).

According to the Philadelphia Inquirer, the pavilion was initially denounced as an “alien spaceship” by one Historical Commission member; a National Park Service official also warned that it could ruin the iconic landscape. (The site overlooks the historic Fairmount Water Works.) After several changes, including blending the canopy more into its environment and obscuring the lights, the pavilion gained approval from both commissions.

Despite initial objections, Dan McCoubrey, head of the commission’s Architectural Committee, said that “it’s a very logical place for a pavilion,” as reported in Plan Philly. “It’s a pavilion that’s contemporary in style. We have a rustic pavilion, a neoclassical pavilion, and now a wonderful contemporary pavilion.”

Inga Saffron's article in the Inquirer pointed out that while the museum did get approval from the Art and Historical Commissions, there was little public engagement process for the pavilion. 

There are more than 80 Skyspace installations across the world, including Turrell's first Philadelphian one in the Chestnut Hill Friends Meeting House. There is no set timeline for the project yet.

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2016 Best of Design Award for Student Work: Sensory Pavilion by Dirt Works Studio, University of Kansas

The Architect’s Newspaper (AN)’s inaugural 2013 Best of Design Awards featured six categories. Since then, it's grown to 26 exciting categoriesAs in years past, jury members (Erik Verboon, Claire Weisz, Karen Stonely, Christopher Leong, Adrianne Weremchuk, and AN’s Matt Shaw) were picked for their expertise and high regard in the design community. They based their judgments on evidence of innovation, creative use of new technology, sustainability, strength of presentation, and, most importantly, great design. We want to thank everyone for their continued support and eagerness to submit their work to the Best of Design Awards. We are already looking forward to growing next year’s coverage for you.

2016 Best of Design Award for Student Work: Sensory Pavilion

Team: Dirt Works Studio, University of Kansas Location: Lawrence, KS

Dedicated to the senses, the open-air sensory pavilion is grounded with natural materials: a compacted earth floor, walls of rammed earth and charred cedar, and gravel. From the sound of gravel beneath the feet to the smell of charred wood and dappled light through the rear screen, it’s truly an immersive experience.

Community Partner Audio-Reader Network

Benefactors Randy Austin and Colinda Stailey Austin Structural Engineer Apex Engineers Timber Supplier Wood Haven Roofing Supplier Diamond Everley Roofing

Honorable Mention, Student Work: Resource.full

Team: Fani Christina Papadopoulou Location: Boston, MA

Completed at Harvard Graduate School of Design, this project explores the untapped potential of Columbia Point in Boston, as well as the numerous islands in Boston Harbor by creating transportation and infrastructural systems to better connect them.

Honorable Mention, Student Work: Kamama Prairie Dwelling

Team: MetroLAB, University of Cincinnati School of Architecture & Interior Design Location: Peebles, OH

This 160-square-foot house takes the shipping container as its framework, enhancing it with site-present materials such as barn wood and roofing tin to create a simple, sustainable, and beautiful dwelling.

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This pavilion by Kuth Ranieri Architects is made of concrete formwork

' Kuth Ranieri Architects’ pavilion made out of cardboard Sonotubes (prefabricated tubular formwork for casting concrete), created for this year’s Market Street Prototyping Festival in San Francisco, has earned the firm a People’s Choice award. Designed and built alongside three dozen other installations, the pavilion—dubbed SonoGROTTO—is made out of a bundle of cardboard Sonotubes varying between 6, 10, and 24 inches in width that are bolted together and carved into a sheltered seating area. Overall, the pavilion’s proportions are equal to those of a cube, with circular sections carved out from the overall mass. Certain Sonotubes extend all the way to the ground and support the structure while others are sliced up along curving profiles, creating the benches, thresholds, and openings that animate the pavilion. The pavilion, designed to be located on an active street, creates what the designers dub as an urban “grotto,” containing areas sheltered by a vaulted ceiling punctured by an oculus that offers views to the sky. In a press release explaining the project, the architects state, “Porous enough to retain a strong connection with its surroundings, yet enclosed enough to provide a safe haven, SonoGROTTO allows people to explore and rest simultaneously. SonoGROTTO offers a space for reflection, refuge, and a myriad of alternate uses for all ages.” The festival was sponsored by the San Francisco Department of City Planning and Yerba Buena Center for the Art. It's also the by-product of extensive community outreach by the department aimed at uncovering new, innovative ideas for enhancing the quality of life along Market Street in downtown San Francisco. As such, the festival organizers sought to engage at the community level through a design-oriented street festival. The three-day festival brought thousands out onto the Market Street corridor along three areas spanning from the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts on one end to the Embarcadero on the other to display a myriad of pavilion ideas that spanned in concept from architectural follies and performance-oriented displays to even, a miniature forest.  For more information on the other pavilions, see the festival website.
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Kengo Kuma designs malleable pavilion for Design Miami

Japanese architect Kengo Kuma has designed a billowing geometric pavilion for the Phillipe Gravier Gallery at the biannual Design Miami/Basel 2016 design forum. Called Owan, Kuma's pavilion aims to establish a dialogue between architecture and the landscape by employing an undulating mesh-like structural shell. Owan's design also derives from the curvature often found in fish scales and traditional tea bowls from Kuma's homeland. The pavilion's shell can be altered, changing its relationship to the site and its interior dimensions. Though appearing porous, Owan is lined with a thin waterproof membrane that can move in the wind along with the lightweight structure. https://vimeo.com/164417666 In the video above, you can see how the structure responds to light. Given the structure's intended natural environment, the trajectory of the sun should play in important role in the pavilion's performance. Design Miami/ (June 14 - 19) is a forum that has a strong pedigree in the world of design collectables. Kuma’s Owan will be presented at the forum's “Design at Large,” which will also exhibit further large-scale installations under the theme of "tea house," notably Ron Arad’s Armadillo Tea Canopy by Revolution Precrafted.
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An expanse of sustainable timber just clinched the Chicago Architecture Biennial’s Lakefront Kiosk Competition

Officials with the Chicago Architecture Biennial today announced the winners of the Lakefront Kiosk Competition, choosing a team whose stated goal was “to build the largest flat wood roof possible.” Dubbed Chicago Horizon, the design is by Rhode Island–based Ultramoderne, a collaboration between architects Yasmin Vobis and Aaron Forrest and structural engineer Brett Schneider. Their pavilion uses cross-laminated timber, a new lumber product that some structural engineers call carbon-negative for its ability to displace virgin steel and concrete while sequester the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide during its growth. Ultramoderne's long, flat roof “aims to provide an excess of public space for the Architecture Biennial and Chicago beach-goers,” according to the project description. Their design rose above 420 other entries from designers in more than 40 countries, and will receive a $10,000 honorarium, as well as a $75,000 production budget to realize the kiosk. BP is providing those funds as part of a $2.5 million grant to the inaugural biennial. Three teams—Lekker Architects, Tru Architekten, and Kelley, Palider, Paros—were finalists for the top honor. Fala Atelier, Kollectiv Atelier, and Guillame Mazars all received an honorable mention. The Biennial has posted a selection of submissions to the Lakefront Kiosk Competition on its Pinterest page.

After the biennial, Chicago Horizon "will find a permanent home in Spring 2016, operating as a food and beverage vendor, as well as a new public space along the lakefront.

During the Biennial three other kiosks will be installed along the lakefront. Details on those are due to be announced next week, but here are the preliminary project descriptions:
The Cent Pavilion, designed by Pezo von Ellrichshausen in collaboration with the Illinois Institute of Technology, is a forty-foot tower meant to convey silent and convoluted simplicity. Rock, the kiosk designed by Kunlé Adeyemi in collaboration with the School of the Art Institute of Chicago is a pop-up pavilion a public sculpture composed from the raw and historic limestone blocks that once protected the city’s shoreline. Summer Vault, designed by Paul Andersen of Independent Architecture and Paul Preissner of Paul Preissner Architects, in collaboration with the University of Illinois, Chicago, is a lakefront kiosk that consists of basic geometric shapes combined to create a freestanding hangout within the park.
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Oyler Wu, Take 2

Last year we showcased Oyler Wu's SCI-Arc graduation pavilion, a swooping steel, fabric, and rope construction that floated above the event like a billowing sail. For last week's graduation the firm added a small addition while making significant improvements. The addition, which sat school directors and special guests, became a stage for diploma presentation. Made of a torqued steel shell fitted with twisting fabric (Wu calls it a three dimensional twist), the addition is no replication: it creates a simpler, more unified complement to the original, which involves a more complex web of fabric and roping. As for the original pavilion, they replaced its (disturbingly) dirty fabric with darker material and re-oriented the whole thing toward the school itself. Next year's pavilion will be designed by Marcelo Spina. We can't wait.
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Spotlight on Orchard Beach Pavilion

Deborah Wye’s lecture on Orchard Beach yesterday at the City Island Historical Society Nautical Museum was months in the making. The curator emerita of MoMA's prints department was immersed in research about a year ago for the Nautical Museum's exhibit celebrating 75 years of Orchard Beach in Pelham Bay Park and in particular its bathhouse pavilion. The show, called Orchard Beach Pavilion: Past, Present and Future, runs through October 16.  The show and lecture got a huge bump when Christopher Gray made the pavilion the focus of his "Streetscapes" column in Sunday's New York Times. Wye's efforts couldn’t have come at a better time. Orchard Beach is on an upswing. After nearly forty years of drifting off into the Long Island Sound, the beach’s snow-white sand was replaced last winter. Now the crumbling bathhouse, designed by Aymar Embury II, is ready for its close-up. The building is crumbling due to a condition called calia silica reaction (a.k.a. "cement cancer"). The Office of Management and Budget have sent out an RFP for pavilion proposals. During her presentation Wye said the proposals range from tearing it down and building anew, to incorporating elements of the old structure into a new building, to an all-out restoration, which would cost more than $50 million. Orchard Beach has seen many proposals over the years that didn’t make it past the planning stage because the surrounding community beach didn’t want the increased crowds associated with theme parks, as was the case with the Seabreeze Land Development scheme of the 1980s. That plan included a 10,000-seat amphitheater and a winterized recreation facility. By the 1990s New York Water Park LLC had planned a "High Thrills Complex" that envisioned a giant water slide towering over the site. That project also got squelched. Wye said that community meetings to discuss the new proposals will take place in six to eight months. In the meantime, she plans to take her lecture on the road, presenting throughout the borough and the city in an effort to familiarize New Yorkers with this remarkable Moses-era project. As several constituencies that use the beach are not represented by the community board or the state/congressional districts, one can only hope that Wye’s succinct presentation will find its way to neighborhoods where residents who use the beach the most will get to see it. That includes parts of the South Bronx, as well as Washington Heights and Inwood sections of Manhattan. Having a Spanish translator on hand wouldn’t hurt either.