Posts tagged with "Patrick Tighe Architecture":

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Fashion, infrastructure, and retrofuturism collide in new shows at L.A.’s A+D Museum

This weekend, the Architecture and Design Museum (A+D) in Los Angeles launched The Assembly, an event marking the opening of five simultaneous exhibitions at the museum that engage with a variety of architectural perspectives. The wide-ranging exhibitions deep-dive into the work of local architects and disciplinary concerns, like the relationships between plan, section, and elevation. See below for a breakdown of the various exhibitions now on view.   With Cycle & Pattern For With Cycle & Pattern, A+D has partnered with Otis College of Art and Design to create an exhibition of student work from the school's Fashion Design department focused on the "playful interaction between the elegance of the celestial and whimsy of the mortal and material." The horoscope-inspired works have been created by junior and senior students studying under Jose Fernandez of Ironhead Studio and costume designer Louise Mingenbach, two top Hollywood costume designers. The works are organized as four dioramas that can be experienced individually as well as in a group.   3-Ways Billed as A+D's inaugural Guest Curator Program exhibition, 3-Ways is organized by A+D Chief Curator Anthony Morey and Guest Curator Program members Ivan Bernal and Ryan Tyler Martinez, and aims to create a "platform for plan, section, and elevation to communicate with each other at a 1:1 scale." Organized as a "series of conversations," the exhibition pulls together work from over 30 architects, designers, and artists to explore the interrelationships between different viewing and drawing modes.   Sunset 2050 Sunset 2050, a collaboration between Craig Hodgetts's SUPRASTUDIO at the University of California, Los Angeles and students from the ArtCenter College of Design Transportation Design program, posits a master plan for L.A.'s Sunset Strip that fully embraces autonomous vehicle technologies. By championing the "innate charm" of the Strip, the collected research project interrogates the ever-escalating "congestion" of urban street life, a territory that now demands space for digital, geo-location, and soon, autonomous technologies. The exhibition is supported by the UCLA Department of Architecture and Urban Design, Gensler, Matt Construction, and BuroHappold Engineering.   Dopplegänger Dopplegänger is a view into the inspirations that lie behind the "architectural mind" of Los Angeles-based Patrick Tighe Architecture. The exhibition presents a collection of recent work that has been reinterpreted through digital and physical collages that circle back to each project's original sources of inspiration in an effort to "retrospectively reinvigorate" the firm's work. By presenting each project with dueling collages and model assemblies, the firm seeks to "catalyze the intentions" behind these projects.   Back to Front StereoBot & Oasys are collaborating on Back to Front, an examination of advances in building technology, zoning, and city planning with regards to affordable housing in Los Angeles. The "urban activation" installation will create a 400-square-foot backyard unit at AplusD. The structure will be used as a community forum that will host a series of community workshops focused on recent trends in affordability innovation. The installation will be on view until September 30, 2018. See the A+D museum website for more information.
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2017 Best of Design Awards for Residential – Multi-Unit

2017 Best of Design Award for Residential – Multi-Unit: True North Designer: EC3 Location: Detroit, Michigan True North is a development comprised of nine rental units and shared community gardens located two-and-a-half miles from Downtown Detroit in a quiet, spacious neighborhood. It has received widespread recognition for pioneering creative, affordable design attuned to its community. For aesthetic and economic reasons, the client challenged the architect to utilize Quonset Huts, a prefabricated lightweight structure consisting of corrugated galvanized steel and having a semicircular cross section. The placement of the huts balances openness and security, views and privacy, socializing and solitude. Each structure is assembled on top of a four-inch concrete slab with in-floor radiant heat, which is also the unit’s finished floor. The end walls feature custom steel framing around polycarbonate panels that provide a higher level of security, natural light and high thermal value. Each interior is unique and designed to inspire different creative lifestyles in Detroit. “It’s always nice to see architects do so much with so little. Despite the restraints of working with prefabricated structures and limited materials palette, they’ve made a surprisingly beautiful development—one that could easily be repeated—for a city that needs creative solutions.” —Morris Adjmi, Principal, Morris Adjmi Architects (juror) Client: Prince Concepts Executive Architect: Studio Detroit Site and Landscape Design: EC3 Landscape Contractor: Heroes Landscape Manufacturer: SteelMaster   Honorable Mention Project: American Copper Building Architect: SHoP Architects Location: New York The American Copper Buildings present two bold and dynamic copper towers ‘dancing’ on NYC's East River. The 761-unit luxury rental community, designed to patinate over time, reaches 41 and 48 stories in height with an iconic, amenity-filled skybridge connecting the two towers.   Honorable Mention  Project: 2510 Temple Architect: Tighe Architecture  Location: Los Angeles

Perched within Los Angeles’s Historic Filipinotown, this combination of market-rate and affordable apartment units responds to the city’s housing crisis. Clad in metal panels, the sculptural form of the entry serves as a connection between the private areas of the project and commercial storefronts at street level.

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2016 Best of Design Award for Interior > Residential: Clinton Hill Courtyard House by O’Neill McVoy Architects

The Architect’s Newspaper (AN)’s inaugural 2013 Best of Design Awards featured six categories. Since then, it’s grown to 26 exciting categoriesAs in years past, jury members (Erik Verboon, Claire Weisz, Karen Stonely, Christopher Leong, Adrianne Weremchuk, and AN’s Matt Shaw) were picked for their expertise and high regard in the design community. They based their judgments on evidence of innovation, creative use of new technology, sustainability, strength of presentation, and, most importantly, great design. We want to thank everyone for their continued support and eagerness to submit their work to the Best of Design Awards. We are already looking forward to growing next year’s coverage for you. 2016 Best of Design Award for Interior > Residential: Clinton Hill Courtyard House Architect: O’Neill McVoy Architects Location: Brooklyn, NY

To turn this dark and narrow historic carriage house into an open, inviting home for a young family, O’Neill McVoy Architects created two light volumes within the structure that would bring sun and nature into the center of the house. The first, cut from the second floor, illuminates the master bedroom, library, and living area below, while the second creates a central garden on the first floor. White-stained plywood accents and a perforated stairwell help create a feeling of expansiveness within the home.

Structural Engineer Robert Silman Associates

Contractor Harper Design Build Stairwell Fabrication B Fabrication Glass Courtyard Enclosure Duratherm Windows Skylights Wasco Skylights and Supreme Skylights

Honorable Mention, Interior > Residential: 2902 at the W Residences

Architects: Page with Furman + Keil Architects Location: Austin, TX

Inspired by Carlo Scarpa’s interest in color and materiality and his fascination with vertical edges, the team sought to create a series of intimate spaces that flow into one another with a pared-down aesthetic, muted tones, and luxurious materials.

Honorable Mention, Interior > Residential: Garrison Residence

Architects: Patrick Tighe Architecture Location: Redondo Beach, CA

Located one block from the Pacific Ocean, this three-story house has a simple massing punctuated with articulated openings that frame views of the surrounding mountains and ocean.

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Tighe Architects brings 47-unit mixed use apartment to Temple Street in L.A.

A new 47-unit apartment complex is coming to L.A.’s Historic Filipinotown at 2510 Temple Street. Designed by Los Angeles-based Tighe Architecture, the project consists of a four-story mixed-use structure housing 2,000 square feet of ground-level restaurant and retail space. The project is being developed by 4Site Real Estate and is clad in alternating bands of standing seam metal panels and cementitious boards with vertically-proportion. Apartments are organized in a U-shape around a central courtyard that contains swimming pool, spa, and gym facilities for residents. Temple Street itself is a quickly-gentrifying east-west axis that runs through many of L.A.’s historic, Downtown-adjacent neighborhoods. 2510 Temple Street complex will also feature a faceted two-story lobby containing ground-level retail and second floor amenities. Construction timeline for the for the project is currently unavailable, but the structure is deep into construction. Among other projects, Tighe Architecture is known for their 32-unit La Brea Affordable Housing project for formerly homeless LGBT youth and for the upcoming North Beach Playground.
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Out of Memory: Patrick Tighe Architecture with Machineous

Fabrikator Brought to you by:

A site-specific installation at the SCI-Arc Gallery transforms a musical composition by Ken Ueno into a digitally realized built environment.

A robot, a composer, and an architect walk into a gallery. It could be the start of a corny joke, but instead it’s the captivating formula for Patrick Tighe’s new exhibition at the SCI-Arc Gallery. The composer is Ken Ueno, recipient of the Rome and Berlin Prizes, and the robot belongs to Machineous, the Los Angeles-based fabricator hired to realize Tighe’s architectural representation of Ueno’s music.
  • Fabricator Machineous
  • Architect Patrick Tighe Architecture
  • Location Los Angeles, California
  • Completion Date February 4, 2011
  • Material renewable polyurethane foam
  • Process on-site, six-axis robotic milling
The installation, entitled Out of Memory, brings together sound, material, light, and technology to create an extra-sensory cave within the school’s gallery space. Tighe began the work by creating a spectrogram of Ueno’s site-specific musical composition, translating the frequency map into points and vectors, which ultimately provided a basis for the digitally modeled 3-D surface. After a framework of forms and thin plastic sheeting was in place, layers of closed-cell foam (for structural support) and open-cell foam (for acoustic value) were sprayed onto the wall assembly. Provided by insulation manufacturer Demilec, the vegetable and soy oil-based foams created a self-supporting parabolic structure as they expanded. There were few transportation costs involved, said Machineous founder Andreas Froech. “It was extremely efficient, and an incredible statement for construction—that you can take construction material in liquid form to a site and expand it there.” Plus there are no seams. Once the foam was in place, Froech’s six-axis robotic milling equipment did the work, using the musical data Tighe created to carve the cave’s interior walls. On the exterior, some surfaces were left untouched, creating a textural play between the carved sonic contours and the natural disorder of sprayed-on foam. Working with lighting designer Kaplan Gehring McCarroll Architectural Lighting and acoustical engineer McKay Conant Hoover, Tighe then transformed the cave into a environment for listening to Ueno’s work. Custom sound software creates an ever-changing musical performance that visitors hear in a series of contrasting chambers, all the while experiencing a newly discovered frontier in digital fabrication.