Posts tagged with "Patricia Urquiola":

Six lavishly appointed bath fixtures

From classic Italian marble basins to glass-framed showers and designer collaborations, the newest bathroom fixtures and accessories combine luxurious materials with pared-down, simplified forms—a juxtaposition that makes for a downright lavish lavatory. Thurso Freestanding Shower Drummonds

Standing nearly eight feet tall on a cast-iron base, the Thurso shower is complexly enclosed in glass and framed by an ornate metal system. Available in 17 finishes, the autonomous enclosure features a 12-inch built-in showerhead.

Marmoreal Max Lamb for Dzek

Pre-cast in terrazzo marble, the bathtub and sink are from Max Lamb’s Marmoreal collection and ongoing Quarry series. The sculptural works are characterized by their raw and unapologetic appearance, and of course, their generous scale. They are both available in white-background Bianco Verona or black-background Grigio Carnico.

  Aurora Showerhead Alex Miller Studio

Alex Miller Studio designed an entire collection inspired by the ocean, aptly named By the Sea. With an organic shape that nods to tidal ebbs and flows, both showerheads are available in chrome and gold.

Sonar Patricia Urquiola for Laufen

Patricia Urquiola designed the third iteration of Laufen’s SaphirKeramik collection with inspiration from the phenomenon of sound waves moving through water. With a mutable interplay of alterations throughout the nine washstands and one bathtub, she envisioned “wavelength-thin” fixtures with a “dissonant” ribbed surface texture.

Luv Collection Cecile Manz for Duravit

Danish industrial designer Cecilie Manz designed a comprehensive series of washbasins, lighted touch-screen mirrors, and other items for open, Nordic-style bathrooms. The basins can be glazed in satin-matte white, gray, or sand, and the table console with drawers is available in six earth-toned colors. Meanwhile, the tabletop comes in quartz stone or solid wood.

JP marble mg12

Milan-based designer Monica Freitas Geronimi conjured a pristine overmount basin from Carrara marble with integrated circular tap handles that are complemented by brass-hued fittings. It is also available in a charming gray Basaltina stone.

Six stunning surfaces for the kitchen and bath

This collection of colorful tiles—acrylic, terra-cotta, and porcelain—creates surfaces that are equally durable and beautiful, taking any room to the next level.
Gonzaga Christina Celestino x Fornace Brioni Milan-based architect and designer Christina Celestino dreamed up a collection of motifs based on designs typically found in Italian 15th-century paint on pavimenti in cotto (terra-cotta floors). Following on typical patterns of light, perspective, and draped effects, the assortment of tiles is dominated by gray and variegated terra-cotta, giving it a markedly Renaissance air, in line with the period’s ideals of beauty and harmony. Fence Iris Ceramica x Diesel Living A chain-link fence and mesh coatings, this collection is a mélange of white on white, white on black, and of course, black on black.   Cover Patricia Urquiola for Mutina Patricia Urquiola, Spanish architect and designer (and adopted Italian), has designed various collections for Mutina since 2008, but Cover marks her first stint with large ceramic slabs. The collection came about from an experimental project using clay blended with a mixture of micro-grit, which is then used as a base for the colored patterns applied using the silk screen method. Tonal Collection David Rockwell x Bisazza David Rockwell designed a graphic, vibrant tile range comprising a suite of patterns available in four color families (one is a new color developed just for the designer, called “David Rockwell Blue”). Starting from the existing collection Cementiles, the patterns are based on ombrés, a visual spectrum from one color to another, or, in his mind, something that feels like “a kind of illusion." Agatha Lotus Maison Valentina Influenced by the delicate folds of a lotus flower, this design is done with a succession of parallel lines that weave together in a ring of earth tones. Each tile is digitally printed on two aluminum sheets with a polyethylene core. High Line La Fabbrica Slate natural stone was the main ingredient for a tile collection inspired by the rough train tracks along the trail of New York’s High Line park. Four colors of marbled tile express a kind of weathered look akin to the footpath raised above 11th Avenue.

Patricia Urquiola Talks Self-Driving Cars, Technology, and the Future of Design

Last week, Spanish designer Patricia Urquiola was awarded the Design Excellence Award from Collab, an affiliate group of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, in conjunction with the opening of the first solo exhibition of her work. Known for her inventive and playful approach to both architecture and design, Urquiola shared her experiences studying under Achille Castiglioni, integrating new technologies, designing self-driving cars, and working with virtual reality for Milan Design Week 2018. Early Years “What can I say? I’ve been very lucky. I studied architecture in Madrid and then moved to Milan to attend the Polytechnic University, which was outside of my comfort zone as an architect. Many of the teachers there were also working designers and they were the most interesting people: Vico Magistretti, Achille Castiglioni, Maddalena De Padova, and many others. It was an incredible time to be in Milan. They were all so generous, Vico in particular had a way of taking energy from everyone and putting it all together.” Design and Technology “Technology is absolutely an advantage. Since opening my studio in 2000, technology has changed so much—not only in terms of communication, but how it lets us mix technology and craft. For Salone del Mobile I am doing a virtual reality project in my studio, which of course will not be physical. But, even when I am designing physical things like furniture, light fixtures, and kitchen appliances, it has all evolved to be connected in some way to computers. We should always be open-minded. It doesn’t mean losing a curiosity for things that are crafted, but it means you have to remember the humanistic side and use the technology and the energy to manage it all. We had to become human before we became cyborgs! On Being a Woman in Design “I’m not prejudiced… it does mean you have to do things double-well [as a woman]. I have two daughters, and even though they aren’t in design, I want them to feel comfortable and be fantastic at what they do… I want them to do double-well because that is very good, regardless. It doesn’t mean losing yourself as a person, but you do have to deal with challenges. I don’t think we should look at limits as a limit but as a challenge. Of course there was prejudice when Ferrari asked me to do the exhibition for them, but Ferrari is not stupid—they know that I am a person who can create these experiences and do it well. And I am so happy with the exhibition, because you enter it with this Ferrari red and then you lose the red and really get under the skin of the car. It was about breaking limits and breaking prejudices because they just aren’t necessary.” The Future of Cars  “We have a lot to do in a very short amount of time. I am working with car companies on self-driving cars. We need very modern designers because all cars right now are more or less the same on the inside: There’s a place to buckle your seatbelt, your seats, and lots of leather, you know. But there are thermal reactive, intelligent fabrics that could work much better and other fantastic solutions we can do. When we have the self-driving car we will basically just be living inside of it while it is moving so it becomes architecture. And they need us. The creative community of architects and designers, we can do it.”

Product> Por qué? Parquet!

A modern twist on a centuries-old tradition, geometric patterns are all the rage in updated materials and color options. Biscuit Patricia Urquiola for Listone Giordano

A completely reimagined parquet flooring system, Biscuit uses six modern rounded shapes in different sizes to allow for endless opportunities of new patterns inspired by classic herringbone that is available in a variety of stains.

Liaison Kelly Wearstler for Ann Sacks

Kelly Wearstler is known for her particular aesthetic of combining raw natural materials with more refined pieces. This collection plays up her love for stone and includes made-to-order tile rugs, which may also be used in custom backsplashes, fireplace surrounds, and showers, in addition to five small- and large-tile off-the-shelf patterns.

Labyrinth Refin Ceramiche

Labyrinth is parquet 2.0—inspired by M. C. Escher drawings, the collection of two patterns, Mirror and Angle, can be rearranged to create endless, mazelike configurations that are meant to evoke the works of Josef and Anni Albers.

Wood Bisazza

Composed of a four-millimeter top layer of European oak mounted on phenolic multilayer laminated birch wood, these wood tiles are incredibly versatile and, given their size and shape (one square, one hexagonal), can easily be paired with other cement tiles.

Etic Pro Atlas Concorde

These two-centimeter-thick wood-look porcelain tiles have super-realistic qualities with grain, streak, and marbling variations. The surface is suitable for indoor and outdoor use and is frost-proof and antislip. It is available in both matte and high-gloss finishes.

Restyle Marca Corona

Inspired by age-old wooden tavelle, these ceramic wood tiles truly resemble hardwood. Each tile, available in three color collections, contains a variety of patterns that makes every slab unique. These tiles are highly versatile and, in addition to being ecofriendly, are antislip and resistant to salts, chemicals, and frost.

Shadewood Ceramica Sant’Agostino

This porcelain tile collection comes in six gray hues, including a multicolor diagonal stripe that creates a herringbone pattern. The tiles can withstand quite a bit of wear and are suitable in residential and commercial spaces, indoors and out.

Product> Surfaces Effective: 14 Innovative Materials

Visual grace notes to architectural compositions, surface and finish materials can bring tactility, color, and pattern into a space. From floor to ceiling, from wood and tile to composites and carpeting, here's our pick of the current palette. Plank Floors Dinesen Founded in 1898, this family-run company sources Douglas fir and oak from the best forests in Europe, selecting trees between eighty and 200 years old for exceptional custom flooring installations. Route 66 Viridian Reclaimed Wood These reclaimed red oak and white oak planks and panels get their rustic character from their original use as decking on tractor-trailers. In a variety of lengths and sizes. Waldilla Offered in five wood species—oak, fumed oak, sycamore maple, American cherry, and birch—these free-form flooring planks are anything but straight and narrow. Linear Line Collection Smith & Fong These carved interior panels are LEED-eligible, as the 4-foot by eight-foot, 3/4 inch sheets are made of 100% FSC-certified bamboo. Aura Dekton These fifty-six-inch by 125-inch ceramic slabs can be bookmatched for exterior or interior applications. Available in three thicknesses: 0.8cm, 1.2cm, and 2.0cm. Deep Nocturne DuPont Corian A classic jet black, the solid surfacing can be used in residential, office, and hospitality projects. The material can be thermoformed or worked using conventional wood-shop techniques. Fossil DTS Offered in five patterns, these 24-inch by 24-inch floor-rated porcelain tiles are available in beige, brown, and grey. Designed by Kasia Zareba. Star Land Porcelanico Frost-resistant, this porcelain tile is thermoformed to achieve a three-dimensional surface. In 60cm by 60cm format. Tierras Artisanal Mutina Made of extruded natural terra cotta, this collection comprises five three-dimensional tiles. Designed by Patricia Urquiola. Luminous Carpets Durable, light-transmissive carpeting from Desso combined with super-thin, programmable LED units from Philips turns the floor into a canvas for communication or decoration. Launching in America in April 2015. Cell Lama Made of industrial wool felt, this carpet is pressed—rather than woven or loomed—into random patterns. The material is non-flammable, soundproof, and water-resistant. HEM Collection Carpet Concept This collection of woven carpet is based on non-directional patterns of colored dots. In thirty-four colorways. Designed by Ben van Berkel/UNStudio. Tatami Nanimarquina Soft New Zealand wool is loomed with crisp jute to create a unique textured floorcovering. Designed by Ariadna Miquel and Nani Marquina. Henrik Large Designtex A wallcovering on DNA substrate, the strong lines and colors produce a dynamic pattern; from a distance, the crisp edges blend into an overall design that recalls an Ikat weave. Tall Wolf-Gordon Bending lines weave foreground and background together to create the illusion of height. In seven colorways. Designed by Morgan Bajardi.

Product> Tile: Six Top Picks for Architectural Applications

Ceramic or porcelain, mosaic or large-format, rectified or squared, tile is a clay canvas for not only original expressions, but also for convincing imitations of natural materials. Here’s a sampling of new products. Fossil Design Tale Studio / DTS Fossil is a hand-drawn illustration, inspired by prehistoric imprints of plants and animals on rock formations. The collection was designed by Kasia Zareba, the winner of the manufacturer’s Create Your Own Tile competition. The 24-inch by 24-inch porcelain tiles are available in beige, brown, and grey and five patterns. Tierras Collections Mutina Tierras is a visually rich collection of tiles designed by Patricia Urquiola with a definite nod to nature and ceramics' humble beginnings. Inspired by the look and feel of terra cotta and lava, Tierras comes in two complementary lines. One is the Industrial line (shown) of unglazed homogenous porcelain stoneware in six colors, two geometric decors, and a range of formats and transversal cuts, allowing for the creation of irregular forms and unique compositions for floors and walls. The other family, called Artisanal, is a series of three-dimensional surfaces made of extruded natural terra cotta. Roof tiles, bricks, hollow bricks, and partition walls are metaphorically undone and unstructured, only to be reinterpreted in a new way. In six earth tones, ranging from browns to blues. Freestone Ceramiche Astor In nature, stone is a living, changing organism. Over time, it accumulates layers of sediment, which may be variegated or homogeneous in color and composition. This collection of porcelain color-through tile is rated for indoor and outdoor use. In three colorways and ten sizes, including bullnose trim and mosaic. Rorschach Collection Clé Clé introduces the Rorschach Tile Collection, designed by Paul Simmons and Alistair McAuley of Glasgow-based Timorous Beasties. The Rorschach Tile Collection is composed of five designs that are hand-lithographed on 12-inch by 12-inch limestone or thassos marble tiles. Inspired by traditional 9th-century damask motifs, Timorous Beasties have integrated the classic pattern with Rorschach conceptual imagery. The combination of a familiar medieval motif and a modern blotch-pattern believed to unlock the subconscious has resulted in subversive floral abstractions. Simmons and McAuley use hand drawing, marbling, and puddles of ink to achieve their new damask imagery. "These tile patterns are a reversal of the expected," says Simmons. "Blotches, splats, and drips are normally regarded as disordered accidents. By re-contextualizing the damask and using it as a vehicle to carry Rorschach-esque symmetrical imagery, we have created beauty out of something conventionally repellent." Soula Azuliber A compelling mix of concrete and encaustic looks in a high performance porcelain tile, the Soula line has aesthetic applications in both contemporary and historical settings. Edge Fireclay Tile Available in a dynamic color range that invites creativity, the Edge collection offers three modular options, including the largest handmade tile on the market: 3-inches by 9-inches, 3-inches by 18-inches, and 6-inches by 18-inches. Precisely cut, the tiles are installed with minimal, 1/8-inch grout spacings, resulting in a smooth, continuous polished look for walls, floors, or countertops. Rated for indoor and outdoor use, Edge is made of more than 70 percent recycled content: Clay, glass, waste porcelain, spent abrasives, and granite dust. A gradient color palette of twelve matte finishes is inspired by the hues found in natural stones and minerals.

Q&A> Design Week with Patrizia Moroso

Patrizia Moroso, art director at Moroso, recently chatted with AN about her impressions of ICFF, working with Patricia Urquiola, and the design house's plans for New York Design Week. What are your impressions of ICFF? It is something very important for the U.S. and for New York. For me, around the fair and outside the pavilions, there's a lot organized in town. The fair is growing. For example, Milan [Furniture Fair] has become so important these years. In Milano, we have something like 3,000 events around design week but this means that people are excited. Now, New York is becoming something like this. You have so much happening around it. The interest and the dialogue between the institutions and the companies and firms can carry on in and around the fair. What is Moroso doing for ICFF? It takes place one month after Milano, so we usually present a few of those releases, [since] that is the big show for us. It's natural to present what we've done in Milano but with another special twist. This year we're transforming the space for Patricia [Urquiola] and in the window [overlooking Greene Street] we're showing the things we've done for Patricia and Kvadrat. We were talking months before the fair so we decided to do something together. Fabric is great for upholstery and we have an installation that was amazing for me. We won an important award in Milano and are happy to say we were the winners this year, so we can show just a glimpse of that here in New York. Because the installation was so big—it took 10 days to install in the [Milan] space—it was not easy to reproduce. Some [challenges were] material, some immaterial. But the exhibition we had [there] was not possible to reproduce here. How did you start working with Patricia Urquiola? About 14 years ago, she was just starting in the design profession. She was managing projects in another big studio in Milano but her name wasn't attached [to her work], as it happens a lot with young designers. A common friend called me to tell me about her; "She's a young designer who's ready to tell her own story. I think you'll be perfect match." I saw her work and energy, and we started working together [pretty much] right away. We are good friends and work together a lot. We are sharing many things, even outside of our profession. Our lives are very intertwined. Is there anything special about showing in New York? The mood here is very happy and bright. It's spring here, [so with the] flowers [in the window] we're trying to recreate that feeling. We painted the showroom in all bright colors, just like space in Milano and we are carrying a mood that we started in Italy. What you see in the window are prototypes that we are presenting but are not yet in production. These are really new things. For example, we are showing our new sofa system, MASSAS, an acronym for Moroso Asymmetric Sofa System Adorably Stitched. Its massive and delicate at once: it's not a common piece of furniture. The other things we will present is our new fabric collection in new colors. Everything is coordinated with the new colors and flowers because the collection is happy. It's not feminine but the approach is very sweet. We want to be optimistic and joyful. For us, it's a new style. What is your favorite thing about coming to New York? The energy, the air—it sparkles! You can come on a rainy day but the morning after everything twinkles. There's something about it. You walk the streets and you're happy. The air in your face is sweet; maybe it's the ocean? The light? It's the atmosphere. If you sit at a cafe and see the people walking, you can see the planet in an hour. You see all the nations here. That, for me, is incredible. When you put all the different people together you have a fantastic melting pot here in the city. It's the power of humanity. I really hope to work more in a country like this, that I love so much. The possibilities here are grand. I really like the thinking here. I meet a lot of architects and designers and everyone is so special. Things are moving fast, projects are growing, it's all very interesting. There's lots of energy in terms of thinking, too. It's all very positive and fast paced.

PRODUCT> Cersaie 2012: Patricia Urquiola for Mutina

While it seemed as if almost every ceramic tile manufacturer at Cersaie was debuting a new line of faux wood grain textured panels, Patricia Urquiola, Creative Director of Mutina Ceramiche & Design, embraced the artisanal tradition of hand painted 20 by 20 cm decorative tile with her new collection, Azulej. Though the nine different color-rich patterns aren't each painted by Urquiola's own hand, the laser printing has a softer, slightly weathered look, and the unbleached hydraulic cement retains its natural properties, giving the finished porcelain tiles a handcrafted feel. Azulej also includes a white, light grey and dark grey set of 27 patterns designed to be mixed and matched in any number of possible combinations. See the pictures for inspiration or create your own "compositional carpet," as Urquiola calls them.